Upcoming Deadlines

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Pick up a clicker. Have your student ID number ready to enter. Upcoming Deadlines. First Homework (Setting up a Blog) 5 points Second Homework (Mini-portfolio): Due Thursday, Sept. 1 st (This week) no later than 8 AM! 10 points (5 points if late) - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Transcript of Upcoming Deadlines

Uniform Motion

Upcoming DeadlinesFirst Homework (Setting up a Blog)5 points

Second Homework (Mini-portfolio):Due Thursday, Sept. 1st (This week) no later than 8 AM! 10 points (5 points if late)

For full schedule, visit course website:ArtPhysics123.pbworks.comPick up a clicker.Have your student ID number ready to enter.1Homework Assignment #2Make an entry in your course blog called "Mini-Portfolio" to post images and movies showing some examples of your work in animation or illustration (if any).

Also tell me a little bit about yourself, such as your major, what courses you've taken in art and in science, what you're taking now, what you're interested in doing when you finish school, etc.2Homework #2 (cont.)You will not be graded on the quality of the work; some of you have extensive portfolios while others are just starting (or have no experience at all).

The purpose of this assignment is two-fold: First, it gives you some practice editing your blog, in particular uploading images and movies. Second, it gives me (and your classmates) a chance to get to know you.3Homework #2 (cont.)Assignment Checklist* Created post entitled "Mini-Portfolio" on your personal blog for this course.* Uploaded at least two images, preferably but not necessarily your own work.* Uploaded at least one video clip, preferably but not necessarily your own work.* Included a paragraph describing yourself, especially your academic work. 4Homework #2 (cont.)This assignment is due by 8am on Thursday, Sept. 1st (This week)

The morning that your homework is due Ill visit your blog, check that youve done it, assign a grade (points), and leave comments.Tell me if you want me to send your grade by e-mail instead of posting it on your blog.5Using ClickersWell be using clickers for class participation.

If you dont remember your student ID number, look it up now.6Activating your Clicker* Turn on your clicker.* After a few seconds, hit the * key* Scroll down using the key until you reach ID: and press the Enter/Send key* Type in your student ID; hit Enter/Send.

Hit any key to wake the clicker from sleep mode.7Activating your Clicker* Scroll down to New class scan* Enter the channel number or letter for joining this class. Hit Enter/Send key.* Clicker should read AP123KF11* Hit Enter/Send.Clicker is now ready to use; leave it on.

Hit any key to wake the clicker from sleep mode.8Survey QuestionWhat is your major?Animation / Illustration Art majorArt major but not A/IScience or engineering majorNone of the above

Enter your answer and press the green Return key.The display should say Received

9Survey QuestionYou have already done the second homework (mini-portfolio).

True (T) or False (F)

Note: You score 1 point of credit for answering survey questions, regardless of your answer.

10Survey QuestionHow much time did you spend on the first homework (create a blog)Less than 30 minutesAn hour or soSeveral hoursDid not get it done yet

11Clicker Questions in ClassKeep your clicker handy during class; youll be asked quiz questions from time to time.During these quizzes you may talk to other persons to discuss the question. The point is for you to learn rather than just testing.Each class will start with a quiz question so be on time!

Hit any key to wake the clicker from sleep mode.12Physics of FallingPart I

13Ball Drop Animation ExerciseTypically the first example one looks at in animation is falling motion, such as a falling ball.

In this exercise, the drawing couldnt be simpler. Its just the same round ball in every drawing.

Nevertheless, animating the ball so that it moves realistically can still be a challenge. But the challenge is not in how you draw the ball but where it is drawn on each frame.

14Ball Drop in Animation BooksThe ball drop is discussed in every major textbook for animation.

Why is this exampleconsidered so important?15Its all in the timingAn essential element of animation is the timing and spacing between drawings

Its not important what goes on each frame of film; its the spaces between the frames that are important. Norman McLarenOscar winning animator of Neighbors

16Principles of AnimationIn The Illusion of Life, Frank Thomas and Olie Johnston list a set of basic principles for animation.Squash & StretchTimingAnticipationStagingFollow Through & Overlapping ActionStraight Ahead & Pose-to-Pose Action7.Slow In and Slow Out8.Arcs9.Exaggeration10.Secondary Action11.Appeal

17Principles of Timing and SpacingThe principles of timing and spacing used to create a believable ball drop apply to many other types of motion, even character animation such as a jumping cat or effects animation such as a stream of water.

18Timing: Frames, Keys, & ClocksWe use three different ways of measuring time:

Frames (intervals of 1/24th of a second) Keys (reference poses, with given # of frames between them) Clocks (actual seconds as measured by a clock)

For example, you may slug out a scene using a stop watch, then convert that into a number of key poses, which appear as frames on your dope sheet (also called an exposure sheet or X sheet).19Frames per Second (FPS)Frame rate is measured in frames per second (FPS). Two common frame rates:

24 FPS Used in film30 FPS Used in video

We will always use 24 FPS in our examples and convert to video frame rate if needed.

(4 Frames of Film) = (5 Frames of Video)20

Frames between KeysIMPORTANT: For simplicity, in all our examples the key poses will always have an equal number of frames between each key.

#1#2#3#4#5Here are the key poses in a jump with the drawings shot on threes, that is, three frames per drawing.

21

Dope Sheets#1#2#3#4#5FrameKey1#12|3|4#25|6|7#38|Dope sheets (also called exposure sheets or X-sheets) are used by animators to tabulate which drawing goes on which frame.

Dope SheetAn animator using a dope sheet, including dialogue analysis and thumbnail storyboard sketches.22Uniform MotionThe simplest type of motion is uniform motion; a heavy ball rolling on a table is a good example.

Larger the spacing, the faster the ball is moving.In uniform motion, the velocity is constant so the spacing from frame to frame is constant.23Uniform Motion & SpeedThe timing and spacing determine the speed.

10 miles per hour 7 inches per frame20 miles per hour15 inches per frame30 miles per hour22 inches per frame40 miles per hour29 inches per frame50 miles per hour37 inches per frame60 miles per hour44 inches per frame90 miles per hour66 inches per frameThe ball rolls about 20 inches per drawing so 10 inches per frame so about 15 m.p.h.This bowling ball is 12 inches in diameter with two frames per drawing (shooting on twos).What is the speed of the bowling ball?24Wile E. Coyote on Rocket SkatesLets estimate his speed in this scene from Beep Beephttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4YxdXw9evc

25QuestionWhat would you guess is Wiles speed?20 m.p.h.40 m.p.h.60 m.p.h.80 m.p.h.100 m.p.h.

26Estimating Wiles Speed10 miles per hour 7 inches per frame20 miles per hour15 inches per frame30 miles per hour22 inches per frame40 miles per hour29 inches per frame50 miles per hour37 inches per frame60 miles per hour44 inches per frame90 miles per hour66 inches per frameHe travels about the length of his ears (say 12-15 inches) per frame so hes only going about 20 m.p.h.

Frame 717Frame 718*Correction of 20% since movie is 30 fps instead of 24 fps; going 24 m.p.h.27

Slowing In (or Easing In)If an objects motion is not uniform, the object is either speeding up, slowing down, or changing direction.If the speed is decreasing then the spacing between drawings decreases, which in animation is called slowing in (or easing in).A sled slowing by friction is a simple example of slowing in.SlowingIn28Slowing Out (or Easing Out)If the speed is increasing then the spacing between drawings increases, which in animation is called slowing out (or easing out).

A ball rolling down an incline is an example of slowing out.A ball falling downward is another example of slowing out.

SlowingOutSlowing Out29Principles of AnimationSlowing in and out is another one of the principles of animation.Squash & StretchTimingAnticipationStagingFollow Through & Overlapping ActionStraight Ahead & Pose-to-Pose Action7.Slow In and Slow Out8.Arcs9.Exaggeration10.Secondary Action11.Appeal

30Spacing ChartsThe Animators Survival Kit (and many other books) presents slowing in and out with spacing charts next to the animation drawings.

Pendulum SwingSpacing ChartSlowingOutSlowingIn31Slowing In & Out in Spacing ChartsUniform motion (from Animators Survival Kit)

Slowing in & out (from Animators Survival Kit)

32Slowing In & Out in Character AnimationThe importance of slowing in & out is that it occurs commonly in all types of animated motion.

(from Animators Survival Kit)33Ball Drop Animation ExerciseLets look at the ball drop in detail, first looking at the motion as the ball slows out from the apex.

ApexFirst, well carefully observe the motion, both live and with video reference.34Ball Drop Video Referencehttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YSqkulTyaNYFalling occurs quickly so its difficult to see details.

35Ball Drop Video Referencehttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vHYuAz6sY4kThis is in slow-motion, at one-quarter the normal speed.

36Distance Fallen from an ApexTime (seconds)FramesDistance fallen from apex1/2411/3 inch1/1221 1/3 inches1/833 inches1/645 1/3 inches 61 foot1/381 feet 124 feet2/3167 feet 189 feet12416 feetDistance fallen from the drawing at the highest point (called the apex) is given by this table.T