CLR Teacher Fellows Spring 2015 February 28, 2015 Bret Harte Middle School

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Transcript of CLR Teacher Fellows Spring 2015 February 28, 2015 Bret Harte Middle School

  • CLR Teacher FellowsSpring 2015February 28, 2015

    Bret Harte Middle School

  • Agenda

    12:30 Lunch1:30 Lesson Plan Development 2:00Reflection 2:30 Homework Review, Evaluation, Announcements and Dismissal

    , 8:00Welcome and Grounding8:20Course Updates8:30 Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Teaching and Learning9:45Break10:00An Overview of Session 1 MOOC 11:15Backwards Planning Using Essential Questions

  • BRET HARTE MIDDLE SCHOOL

    Network Name: 8170Password: 4d532d323137302d3933303130

  • THANK YOU FOR BREAKFAST!

    KATHY ESTIBALIZ BRENDA MARITIES SHARON GLENDAMICHELLENINAALYSIAGREG

  • EVALUATION REUSLTS24 out of 41 participants responded87.5% of participants agreed that the goals/objectives were clearly stated87.5% of participants agreed that the content was aligned to the stated goals and objectivesSome participants shared the following responses: Great modelingIt was absolutely great!Collaborating with colleaguesMore explanation of lesson planMore classroom applicationSnacks during session

  • Group NormsArrive on timeBe respectful Be present: listen actively and attentivelySilence your phonesParticipate to the fullest of your ability -- community growth depends on the inclusion of every individual voice

  • OBJECTIVES

    Establish a professional learning community amongst the CLR Teacher FellowsReview Course Requirements and updatesExplore Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Teaching and Learning for all studentsDefine and Develop Language ObjectivesCreate Essential questions using CCSS for lessonsObtain feedback in regards to Lesson Design Reflect on todays learning

  • GROUNDING Adaptive Schools Find a CLR Teacher Fellow Who

  • Course UpdatesCourse Requirements, Culminating Tasks, Compensation and Responsibilities

  • Culminating Tasks

    CLR/ALD Infused Two Day Lesson Video of LessonPowerPoint Presentation

  • MOOCMassive Online Open Course

  • NovoEd.com

  • Constructing Classroom Conversations

  • MOOC SyllabusAssignment Due Dates:Team Task #1: 3/1Assignment #1: 3/17Peer Evaluations: 3/24Team Task #2: 3/29Assignment #2: 4/7Peer Evaluations: 4/14Team Task #3: 4/19Assignment #3: 4/28Peer Evaluations: 5/5Team Task #4: 5/10Assignment #4: 5/19

  • Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Teaching and Learning (CLR)

    Dr. Jamila Gillenwaters

  • Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Teaching and Learning (CLR)Facilitator:Dr. Jamila GillenwatersSEL Specialist

  • Objective:Participants will further develop a working understanding of CLR and its implications for instruction and SELs.

  • Why CLR? Discussion Protocol :Numbered Heads Together

  • We will view a video clip of Dr. Sharroky Hollie, the author of the book we will all be receiving .

    We will engage in the Watch and Speak Digital Text Analysis Protocol

    Close Viewing of Digital TextWhy Culturally Responsive Education?From the Authors Perspective! New, interesting, or surprising

    ? Raises a question

    Seems important, Answers a Question

    Digital Text Analysis: Chapter 13

  • BREAK

  • MOOCSession OneDr. Magan Mitchell

  • Search for GoodnessLawrence-Lightfoot (1983) explained that she was inspired to move beyond traditional methods of social science research because of the continued focus on pathology and disease rather than health and resilience (p. 8).

  • MOOC SESSION ONE ASSIGNMENTS Housekeeping Task 1Assignment #1Team Task #1Reading: Classroom Discourse: The Language of Teaching and LearningInstructional Videos

  • 2-Minute Academic Conversation AnalysisThe goal of this activity is for you to gain a more dynamic picture of your focal students and their Academic Language Skills:The Partner Activity: Do you agree or disagree? Should marijuana be legalized? Why or Why not?Prompt starter (A):Response starter (B): What do you think?1. I think that . I agree or disagree with you because?2. I agree or disagree with you because I think that 3. Would you like to add anything else?3. I would also like to add that.

  • Session One Videos

  • Now Consider Two Focal Students Select any two students to focus on for your language assessment.

  • Chapter Two: Designing Activities and Lessons The bigger the building, the stronger its foundation needs to be.An ounce of planning is worth a pound of confusion avoidance and pedagogical triage

  • Teacher Reflection Strand 1: ID Complex Language Demands to Create Language ObjectivesStrand 2: Structure Engaging Tasks that Require Authentic and Original Communication Strand 3: Build on Background Knowledge, Culture and Language

  • Three Main Dimensions of Academic LanguageMessage: Create a logical flow of and connections between ideas, knowing how ideas develop and need to develop.Sentence: Combine ideas, phrases, and clausesWord/Phrase: Figure out the meaning of new words and terms

  • Complex Language Demands (p.7)

  • Creating Language ObjectivesStep 1: Reflect on the complex language needs of the students in the class. What language knowledge and skills do they most need to develop? Analyze their written work and listen to their conversations.Have short interactions with them to gauge their language abilities.

    Source: Zwiers, J., Ohara, S., & Pritchard, R., (2014). Common Core Standards in Diverse Classrooms: Essential Practices for Developing Academic Language and Disciplinary Literacy. Portland,ME: Stenhouse Publishers.

  • Creating Language ObjectivesStep 2: Analyze the content objective for message organization (i.e., discourse) demands; then sentence-level demands; and then word and phrase demands. Step 3: Analyze texts that will be used. Texts include written texts, oral messages, videos, and visuals. Identify the most challenging language for message organization (i.e., discourse) demands; then sentence-level demands; and then word and phrase demands.

    Source: Zwiers, J., Ohara, S., & Pritchard, R., (2014). Common Core Standards in Diverse Classrooms: Essential Practices for Developing Academic Language and Disciplinary Literacy. Portland,ME: Stenhouse Publishers.

  • Creating Language ObjectivesStep 4: Analyze tasks that will be used, including assessment tasks. Tasks include activities and products. Identify the most challenging language for message organization (i.e., discourse) demands; then sentence-level demands; and then word and phrase demands Step 5: Choose the most pressing demands. Look back at the lesson objective and decide which language is most useful for learning and showing learning of the objective.

    Source: Zwiers, J., Ohara, S., & Pritchard, R., (2014). Common Core Standards in Diverse Classrooms: Essential Practices for Developing Academic Language and Disciplinary Literacy. Portland,ME: Stenhouse Publishers.

  • Creating Language ObjectivesStep 6: Use the language identified in Step 5 to create a clear language objective. The objective will usually have a function (communication or thinking skill). May or may not have specific terms or syntax strategies in it.

    Source: Zwiers, J., Ohara, S., & Pritchard, R., (2014). Common Core Standards in Diverse Classrooms: Essential Practices for Developing Academic Language and Disciplinary Literacy. Portland,ME: Stenhouse Publishers.

  • Creating Language Objectives from DemandsStudents will be able to (skill or function) using (specific language) in a (type of activity).

  • Language Objective ExampleStudents will be able to understand and express cause and effect relationships in the text, using complex sentences and vocabulary(wide open, emigrate, motivate), as well as cause/effect terms (motivate, led to, as a result, due to) in a discussion with a partner and on an essay organizer.

  • Practice with Language ObjectivesIdentify the skill or function Identify the specific language Identify the type of activity

  • Backwards Design Using Essential QuestionsMs. Cindy Marquez

  • Essential QuestionsOpening Doors to Student Understanding

  • Text as ExpertPlease individually read the following::UbD in a Nutshell - Page 1Suggested Annotations: Box two or more claims made by the author Circle two or more ahas Point an arrow at two or more wonderings

    UbD

  • UbD ConnectionTeaching and Learning Framework

  • Understanding by Design (UbD)Plan backwards from the desired results

    Plan with the end in mind

    Expectations are transformed into targets based upon Big Ideas, Essential Understandings, Essential Questions, and a Summative Assessment

  • Big Ideas and Essential Understandings Big Ideas offer a conceptual framework for a unit of study (themes, principles, theories)

    ExamplesfriendshiprelationshipspowerchangejusticeEssential Understandings frame Big Ideas as an understanding in a sentence.

    ExamplesA friend is a treasure. Relationships change over time.Power is the ability to influence.Change is inevitable.Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

  • Essential QuestionsFrame the key learning goals for a unit of study in the form of a question

    Three connotations of essential:important and timelessfoundationalvital

    A good essential question:Open-ended Transferable ideasThought-provokingRaises more questionsRequires support and justification

  • Essential QuestionsEssential Questions are generated from Big Ideas and they frame the learning goals for a unit of study.Generate more inquiryOpen-