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Newtonite Wednesday, June 9, 2010 • Volume 89, Issue 8 Newton North High School, 360 Lowell Ave., Newtonville, Mass. 02460 Non-profit org. US postage paid Newton, Mass. Permit no. 55337 Teddy Wenneker Senior countdown: Seniors Cameron Tabatabaie, Andrew Blouin and Bohan Leng count down to graduation Friday, June 4 in the cafeteria. Class of 2010 graduates Avia Bui presented Nathan Harris with the Charles Dana Meserve Fund Award. The award is for an outstanding scholar who has made great contributions to the school. Harris was a runner up for the Kennedy Prize for best junior thesis and scored in the 99th percentile in the National Span- ish Exam. He also played piano for Spontaneous Generation and tutored middle school students weekly through the Tutors in Ac- tion program. The Senior Cup honors stu- dents who best represent the ideal Newton North student in terms of character, personality, scholarship and involvement in the community. Rian Murphy presented the Boys’ Senior Cup to Rocco Dono- hue. A Class of ’10 vice president all four years, Donohue was cap- tain of boys’ lacrosse this year. He is also a Peer Mentor leader and a Peer Tutor, and he volun- teered at Christmas in the City, a Christmas party for the homeless in Boston. Greg Kelley presented the Girls’ Senior Cup to Eskinazi. Eskinazi was class president all four years of high school, a mem- ber of the French Club, a PAWS mediator and a peer mentor. She also participated annually in the Charles River Cleanup efforts and volunteered at a local as- sisted-living complex. Andre Donegan presented the Phi Beta Kappa award for academic excellence to Naomi Genuth. Genuth received per- fect scores in the National Latin Examination and the National French Contest, and she was nominated for the Kennedy Prize for best junior thesis. She was a continued on page 3 BY HILARY BRUMBERG M ath teacher Elena Graceffa was award- ed with the Paul E. Elicker Award for Excellence in Teaching and English teacher Janice Miller was awarded with the first Brenda Keegan Teach- ing Prize. They were awarded because they understand and inspire stu- dents, according to nomination letters by students. “They are the best!” said French teach Alieu Jobe, Elicker Committee chair. The Elicker Award is pre- BY HILARY BRUMBERG T o preserve class identity in the new school, the Admin Team decided to make changes in the way home- rooms, lockers and houses are organized. The Admin Team, comprised of principal Jennifer Price, the assistant principals, housemas- ters and department heads, were concerned that each grade will not easily have its own space in the new building, as lockers will not be on Main Street, according to a survey the Admin Team sent to staff. BY MARENA COLE C elebrating the end of its high school years, the Class of 2010 graduated tonight in Boston College’s Conte Forum. To begin the program, the Family Singers performed “Amer- ica the Beautiful” by Katherine Lee Bates, a member of the Class of 1876. Then senior Ryan Vona sang the National Anthem and senior Nneamaka Mordi interpreted it. Principal Jennifer Price wel- comed students, parents and faculty. Graduating EDCO and English Language Learning stu- dents gave greetings in Manda- rin, Cantonese, Korean, Arabic, Russian, Lugandan and American Sign Language. Next, Mayor Setti Warren, superintendent V. James Marini, School Committee member Matt Hills, and Aldermen Stephen Lin- sky and Ted Hess-Mahan spoke to the graduates. Then, senior Eliana Eskinazi, the class president, gave the se- nior tribute to Riley housemaster Mark Aronson and Riley house secretary Maura Roberts. Senior Alison Safran gave a special tribute for the Class of 2010, and senior Camilla Jackson spoke for the Class of 2010. English teacher Inez Dover, a retiree, then spoke for the faculty. Next, Price presented the Principal’s Plaque to Mayor Da- vid B. Cohen. This plaque is for a person or group of people in the New- ton community who has made outstanding contributions to the students, faculty and programs at this school. Seniors then presented awards to their classmates. sented to teachers who display a deep knowledge of his or her subject matter, teaching that stretches the mind of students and standards for performance that inspire excellence. The Keegan Prize is awarded to a teacher who excels at inspir- ing students to think broadly and deeply about their studies and their lives. Graceffa said she is shocked that she won the Elicker Award. “Especially when I look at the list of the teachers that’ve won be- fore,” she said. “I’ve had a num- ber of those teachers on that list. It’s amazing to be on the same list as those giants of the profession in my mind. “I always lit up when learn- ing—it was the thing that made me spark. “Nothing prepared me for how much I would love my students and my classes.” Graceffa graduated in 1999 from this school, where she participated in theater, Family Singers and Orchestra. Graceffa majored in English and took math classes at Yale, where she graduated in 2003. Graceffa has taught here since 2007. Math teacher Tracey Stewart said she thinks Graceffa is very deserving of the Elicker Award. “She is a master of mathemat- ics and is constantly working to build her craft as a teacher,” Stewart said. Miller said that her students helped her win the award. “The students I have this year are re- ally out of this world,” she said. “They’re so strong—it helps me be strong.” Former English department head Brenda Keegan and former English teachers Peter Capodi- lupo and Tom DePeter inspired Miller as a teacher, she said. “If Cappy was the heart and Keegan was rigor, then DePeter was the creatitivity,” Miller said. She graduated from the Uni- versity of Iowa in 1988. She achieved her masters degree in English from the Uni- versity of Virginia in 2001. There, she taught Shakespeare, intro- duction to Literary Studies and poetry seminars. From 2001 to 2002, Miller taught eighth grade English at Marblehead Middle School. She has taught here since 2002. Two teachers awarded in honor of past educators New homerooms teachers to be assigned by grade “Think: where do you decorate for spirit week?” it said. “Where can housemasters find kids? The challenge is what to do about try- ing to honor the student culture at North, and assign homerooms and lockers appropriately.” According to an email house- masters sent to staff, the Admin Team decided to make the follow- ing changes for next year: Assign most members of each grade homerooms and lock- ers in the same area of the school. The homerooms and lockers of students in Barry House will be on the second floor. Beals House members will have homerooms and lockers on the third floor. Adams House homerooms and lockers will be on the third and fourth floors. On the fourth floor, there will be Riley House home- rooms and lockers. Assign new homeroom teach- ers to most existing homerooms. If homeroom teachers kept their same homerooms, they would have to travel from where they teach to their homerooms and back 10 minutes later. Assign most staff houses by floor/department. In general, members of the five main depart- ments will have classrooms in the same area as each other. In most cases, they will also be in the same house as their teaching area, and therefore their depart- ment. The Housemasters understand the disappointment for students and staff who will change home- rooms, they wrote in an email. But they think it’s important for “students to feel bonded with their classmates,” Beals house- master Michelle Stauss said. In the Admin Team’s survey, it wrote that assigning staff houses by department will encourage a “stronger connection between a house and a department, which will be particularly helpful given that house secretaries next year will be asked to take on some departmental duties.” Stauss said she thinks that “no matter how things unfold next year, many of our plans will need to be reviewed over the course of the year because we’ll be in the new building and we’ll need to work out any and all glitches. “We’re going to give this a whirl, and if this doesn’t work, we’re going back to the drawing board.”

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◆ Wednesday, June 9, 2010 • Volume 89, Issue 8 Newton North High School, 360 Lowell Ave., Newtonville, Mass. 02460 BY H ILARY B RUMBERG BY H ILARY B RUMBERG BY M ARENA C OLE Non-profit org. US postage paid Newton, Mass. Permit no. 55337 Teddy Wenneker

Transcript of vol89 issue8 completed.indd

  • Newtonite Wednesday, June 9, 2010 Volume 89, Issue 8 Newton North High School, 360 Lowell Ave., Newtonville, Mass. 02460

    Non-profi t org.US postage paidNewton, Mass.Permit no. 55337

    Teddy Wenneker

    Senior countdown: Seniors Cameron Tabatabaie, Andrew Blouin and Bohan Leng count down to graduation Friday, June 4 in the cafeteria.

    Class of 2010 graduates

    Avia Bui presented Nathan Harris with the Charles Dana Meserve Fund Award. The award is for an outstanding scholar who has made great contributions to the school.

    Harris was a runner up for the Kennedy Prize for best junior thesis and scored in the 99th percentile in the National Span-ish Exam. He also played piano for Spontaneous Generation and tutored middle school students weekly through the Tutors in Ac-tion program.

    The Senior Cup honors stu-dents who best represent the ideal Newton North student in terms of character, personality, scholarship and involvement in the community.

    Rian Murphy presented the Boys Senior Cup to Rocco Dono-hue. A Class of 10 vice president all four years, Donohue was cap-tain of boys lacrosse this year. He is also a Peer Mentor leader and a Peer Tutor, and he volun-teered at Christmas in the City, a Christmas party for the homeless in Boston.

    Greg Kelley presented the Girls Senior Cup to Eskinazi. Eskinazi was class president all four years of high school, a mem-ber of the French Club, a PAWS mediator and a peer mentor. She also participated annually in the Charles River Cleanup efforts and volunteered at a local as-sisted-living complex.

    Andre Donegan presented the Phi Beta Kappa award for academic excellence to Naomi Genuth. Genuth received per-fect scores in the National Latin Examination and the National French Contest, and she was nominated for the Kennedy Prize for best junior thesis. She was a

    continued on page 3

    BY HILARY BRUMBERG

    Math teacher Elena Graceffa was award-ed with the Paul E. Elicker Award for Excellence in Teaching and English teacher Janice Miller was awarded with the fi rst Brenda Keegan Teach-ing Prize.

    They were awarded because they understand and inspire stu-dents, according to nomination letters by students.

    They are the best! said French teach Alieu Jobe, Elicker Committee chair.

    The Elicker Award is pre-

    BY HILARY BRUMBERG

    To preserve class identity in the new school, the Admin Team decided to make changes in the way home-rooms, lockers and houses are organized.

    The Admin Team, comprised of principal Jennifer Price, the assistant principals, housemas-ters and department heads, were concerned that each grade will not easily have its own space in the new building, as lockers will not be on Main Street, according to a survey the Admin Team sent to staff.

    BY MARENA COLE

    Celebrating the end of its high school years, the Class of 2010 graduated tonight in Boston Colleges Conte Forum.

    To begin the program, the Family Singers performed Amer-ica the Beautiful by Katherine Lee Bates, a member of the Class of 1876.

    Then senior Ryan Vona sang the National Anthem and senior Nneamaka Mordi interpreted it.

    Principal Jennifer Price wel-comed students, parents and faculty. Graduating EDCO and English Language Learning stu-dents gave greetings in Manda-rin, Cantonese, Korean, Arabic, Russian, Lugandan and American Sign Language.

    Next, Mayor Setti Warren, superintendent V. James Marini, School Committee member Matt Hills, and Aldermen Stephen Lin-sky and Ted Hess-Mahan spoke to the graduates.

    Then, senior Eliana Eskinazi, the class president, gave the se-nior tribute to Riley housemaster Mark Aronson and Riley house secretary Maura Roberts.

    Senior Alison Safran gave a special tribute for the Class of 2010, and senior Camilla Jackson spoke for the Class of 2010.

    English teacher Inez Dover, a retiree, then spoke for the faculty.

    Next, Price presented the Principals Plaque to Mayor Da-vid B. Cohen.

    This plaque is for a person or group of people in the New-ton community who has made outstanding contributions to the students, faculty and programs at this school.

    Seniors then presented awards to their classmates.

    sented to teachers who display a deep knowledge of his or her subject matter, teaching that stretches the mind of students and standards for performance that inspire excellence.

    The Keegan Prize is awarded to a teacher who excels at inspir-ing students to think broadly and deeply about their studies and their lives.

    Graceffa said she is shocked that she won the Elicker Award. Especially when I look at the list of the teachers thatve won be-fore, she said. Ive had a num-ber of those teachers on that list.

    Its amazing to be on the same list as those giants of the profession in my mind.

    I always lit up when learn-ingit was the thing that made me spark.

    Nothing prepared me for how much I would love my students and my classes.

    Graceffa graduated in 1999 from this school, where she participated in theater, Family Singers and Orchestra.

    Graceffa majored in English and took math classes at Yale, where she graduated in 2003.

    Graceffa has taught here since

    2007. Math teacher Tracey Stewart

    said she thinks Graceffa is very deserving of the Elicker Award. She is a master of mathemat-ics and is constantly working to build her craft as a teacher, Stewart said.

    Miller said that her students helped her win the award. The students I have this year are re-ally out of this world, she said. Theyre so strongit helps me be strong.

    Former English department head Brenda Keegan and former English teachers Peter Capodi-

    lupo and Tom DePeter inspired Miller as a teacher, she said.

    If Cappy was the heart and Keegan was rigor, then DePeter was the creatitivity, Miller said.

    She graduated from the Uni-versity of Iowa in 1988.

    She achieved her masters degree in English from the Uni-versity of Virginia in 2001. There, she taught Shakespeare, intro-duction to Literary Studies and poetry seminars.

    From 2001 to 2002, Miller taught eighth grade English at Marblehead Middle School. She has taught here since 2002.

    Two teachers awarded in honor of past educators

    New homerooms teachers to be assigned by gradeThink: where do you decorate

    for spirit week? it said. Where can housemasters fi nd kids? The challenge is what to do about try-ing to honor the student culture at North, and assign homerooms and lockers appropriately.

    According to an email house-masters sent to staff, the Admin Team decided to make the follow-ing changes for next year:

    Assign most members of each grade homerooms and lock-ers in the same area of the school. The homerooms and lockers of students in Barry House will be on the second fl oor. Beals House

    members will have homerooms and lockers on the third fl oor. Adams House homerooms and lockers will be on the third and fourth fl oors. On the fourth fl oor, there will be Riley House home-rooms and lockers.

    Assign new homeroom teach-ers to most existing homerooms. If homeroom teachers kept their same homerooms, they would have to travel from where they teach to their homerooms and back 10 minutes later.

    Assign most staff houses by fl oor/department. In general, members of the fi ve main depart-

    ments will have classrooms in the same area as each other. In most cases, they will also be in the same house as their teaching area, and therefore their depart-ment.

    The Housemasters understand the disappointment for students and staff who will change home-rooms, they wrote in an email. But they think its important for students to feel bonded with their classmates, Beals house-master Michelle Stauss said.

    In the Admin Teams survey, it wrote that assigning staff houses by department will encourage a

    stronger connection between a house and a department, which will be particularly helpful given that house secretaries next year will be asked to take on some departmental duties.

    Stauss said she thinks that no matter how things unfold next year, many of our plans will need to be reviewed over the course of the year because well be in the new building and well need to work out any and all glitches.

    Were going to give this a whirl, and if this doesnt work, were going back to the drawing board.

  • opinion Wednesday, June 9, 20102 Newtonite, Newton North

    LettersReaders are invited to submit guest articles and letters to the editor. Letters should be put in the Newtonite box in Beals House or emailed to [email protected] The Newtonite reserves the right to edit all letters, which must have the writers name, class and homeroom. The Newtonite serves as a forum for student opinion.

    Dear Newtonite,I want to thank those students

    and parents who attended the eve-ning presentation of SMASHED: Toxic Tales of Teens and Alcohol on Tuesday, May 18th. In thinking about the fi lm and its message, I want to share some information for your consideration.

    As the fi lm poignantly illus-trates, one persons actions af-fects many others: family mem-bers, friends, those s/he may not even know.

    One young woman has per-manent brain injury from getting into a car with someone she had just met and didnt realize how much he had been drinking. Her short-term memory is goneshe cant enjoy movies, nor can she fi nish high school. Another young man whose temperament is now aggressive as a result of a brain injury is in jail.

    Driving while under the infl u-ence of marijuana and other ille-gal/illict substances can be just as dangerous as drinking and driv-ing. Toxicology tests are regularly used with breathalyzers.

    Marijuana impacts perception and is not conducive with multi-tasking, which is exactly what driving requires. Using other illegal and illicit substances (mis-using prescription and/or over the counter medications) also create driving hazards. Additionally, I know many people think you can text while driving, and Ill like to publicly and strongly disagree.

    Driving is fun and freeing and wonderful. Along with that privilege comes responsibility. Please take care and remember that what you choose to do has far reaching consequences that impact more than just yourself.

    Thank you and have a safe and restful summer. ALISON MALKINPREVENTION/INTERVENTION COUNSELOR

    Danger under the infl uence

    guest column

    There is a lot to be said of a safe environment. Despite its falling ceilings and frequently overheated rooms, Newton North is the safest place I know. This is due in part to the nurturing nature of its teachers, in part to the caring staff, and largely in part to who Newton North students are as individuals. In a world of earthquakes and oil spills, North stands out as a safe haven, even though it may not appear as such.

    Newton North is truly a home away from home. It is here that we have found a family of our o w n c h o o s -ing, composed of teachers , friends, and in my case, the boy I peer tu-tored for two years.

    North gives e v e r y o n e a chance to fi nd his or her niche within the larger community. I have known for a long time that I want to study psychology. Having worked with kids for a lot of my life, I decided to take on a role as a peer tutor while I was a junior at North.

    Kate Lewis

    At Senior Breakfast: Seniors Nik Klebanov and Dan Friedman sign yearbooks to celebrate the end of the school Wednesday.

    Without training, I immersed myself in a class of students in Norths special education pro-gram and essentially taught them what my teachers have taught me: how to adapt to a community. The knowledge that my teachers and students have offered me has become my support system in times of instability.

    With the guidance of my North family, I have been allowed the privilege to discover exactly how to help myself in tough situations and how to become a stronger person because of them.

    As students attending classes in an environment in transition, we have come together in spite of the noisy disruptions that come with the construction of the ma-jestic building next door.

    Our class has taken advantage of what North has to offer and has worked it in our favor. Through attending class with a leaking ceiling, we have learned to adapt and come together as a group.

    Weve shown our Tiger Pride at sports games, in the halls of North, and at class fundraising events. The class of 10 has risen above while the building has fallen apart. We have truly proven that its not asbestos, its how you manage the asbestos.

    We leave North knowing we can handle anything. In life, it is inevitable that our ceilings will crumble and pipes will burst. The Class of 2010 is well-equipped to handle all of lifes diffi culties by using the knowledge weve gained here as a metaphorical power tool.

    We leave North with a renewed strength as a group, knowing that our collective love of learning will be useful in lifes good times, too. It is not the crumbling ceilings that make North or its students who we are. It is who we are in the face of them.

    Congratulations, Class of 2010. We did it!

    ALI SAFRAN 10

    Remember the old, but build anew

    Newtonian

    Ali Safran

    Since opening its doors in 1973, this building has played host to an entire generation of Newton North students and faculty. On Monday, June 21, this school will open its doors to students for the last time.

    In September, the new building will open next door with state-of-the-art facilities and the latest in educational technologies.

    T h i s i s s u e o f t h e Newtonitethe last to be published while we occupy the old buildingprovides a forum to refl ect on 37 years of Newton North history. The buildings idiosyncracies are the fi rst point to refl ect on: they give the bricks and mor-tar a personality.

    Main Street, the corri-dor that runs the length of the building, is this schools central artery. During lunch blocks, students congregate along the hallway to eat, and between classes, students stop to chat. Main Street will be maintained as the central area in the new high school.

    If you travel up staircase one, there is the infamous Freshman Trap in between the second and third fl oors. According to lore, the Fresh-man Trap received its name because freshmen were un-able to exit through the now locked door.

    Another urban legend, that Newton Norths architect designed prisons (accounting for the sparse windows) has been disproven.

    The fourth floor is trun-cated into three segments by the Tigers Lofts student-run restaurant and the art room, making it impossible to travel from side to side. In order to cross the fourth floor, one needs to descend to the third floor and take a different staircase to the fourth fl oor twice.

    Then there is the coming of age milestone, the senior tree reserved exclusively for the reigning senior class. The senior tree symbolizes the maturity accumulated

    over years at North and their role as leaders of the school. At the new school, trees will be exclusively outside of the building.

    Nonetheless, it is necessary for a new building due to the poor condition of the current school. The fl oors show the wear of thousands of feet of students who have walked these halls. In order to fi nd a functioning water fountain, one must search the entire school.

    As we move into a new school, we leave a generation of memories and landmarks behind. In the new school, the next generation of students has the opportunity to shape the environment.

    editorial

    A special tribute to senior class

    The Newtonite staff does all the reporting, production work and photography to produce 16 issues a year for a circulation of 2,000.

    To place an ad in the Newtonite or contact us by phone, please call 617-559-6274. Yearly subscriptions cost $20. Readers can also reach us at [email protected]

    To fi nd the Newtonite online go to www.thenewtonite.com.

    The Newtonite, founded in 1922, is the newspaper of Newton North High School, 360 Lowell Ave., Newtonville, Mass. 02460.

    Newtonite

    Editors in chief Marena Cole, Eli DavidowManaging editor Teddy Wen-nekerNews editor Hilary BrumbergSports editors Jay Feinstein, Jacob SchwartzArts editors Kate Lewis, Perrin SteinFeatures editors Jacob Brunell, Fatema ZaidiOn campus editor Meredith AbramsNews analysis editor Steven MichaelPhotography editors Gaby Perez-Dietz, Ivan McGovernProduction managers Katrina Barry, Ben HillsAdvertising managers Emily Gulotta, Tiphaine KugenerBusiness manager Dan SalvucciCirculation managers Alison Berkowitz, Caleb GannonAdviser Kate Shaughnessy

    Production advisers Sue Brooks, Tom DonnellanNews staff Malini Gandhi, Ilana Greenstein, Rebecca Harris, Kayla ShoreFeatures staff Emmett Greenberg, Gavi KaplanSports staff Evan Clements, Nicole Curhan, Jeremy GurvitsArts staff Audrey Derobert, Becky KalishNews analysis staff Kellynette GomezArt staff Anna Kaertner, Maddie MacWilliams, DJaidah WynnPhotography staff Karen Brier, Ryne Duffy, Anna Gargas, Gabe Dreyer, Jaryd Justice-Moote, Ramzy Kahhale, Edan Laniado, Isabel Meigs, Matt VictorCirculation staff Spencer Alton, Stoddard Meigs, Omar Pinkhasov, Michela Salvucci, Stephanie VitoneProduction staff Gabe Dreyer, Peter Taber-Simonian

  • newsWednesday, June 9, 2010 Newton North, Newtonite 3

    2010 graduates

    At first, Charlie recognized that he had a drinking problem because it was interfering with his work. He promised to quit, but this promise proved too diffi cult. He decided that he would take one drink because one drink never really hurt anyone.

    As soon as Charlie had one drink, he realized that he wanted more and eventually he became drunk. In fact, he became so drunk that he blacked out.

    After getting sick from being so drunk, Charlie promises that he wont drink anymore because it was interfering with his life.

    Teddy Wenneker

    Go Tigers!: Senior Ryan Vona cheers on boys lacrosse in the DePeter Cup Wednesday, May 26.

    09 graduates speak about experiencesBY STEVEN MICHAEL

    To describe their experienc-es after graduating from high school, members of the Class of 2009 spoke to current students at the 15th annual First Year Forum.

    The Wednesday, May 12 pre-sentation featured a panel discus-sion with Gwendolyn Campero, Brian Heffernan, Hannah Jernst-edt, David Manopoli, Genevieve Moss-Hawkins, Francis Mullen-Neem and Lillie Rundlettall 09.

    The panelists began by dis-

    cussing how college life differs from life at Newton North. Audi-ence members were encouraged to write their questions for the alumni on a slip of paper.

    The typical course load is four per semester, said Manopoli, who attends Emmanuel College. If you take fi ve courses per se-mester, youre braver than I.

    Jernstedt, who attends Bos-ton University, lived in a huge dorm with all freshmen, she said. When youre older, you can live in a smaller place. I had a room-matewe werent best friends,

    but we got along.When asked about how they

    chose which college to attend, the panelists cited location. All of the alumni present attend schools in the Boston metro area.

    I was one of those people who had no idea what I wanted to do. B.U. has so much, Jernst-edt said.

    In general, the panelists said they were able to maintain friend-ships from high school in col-lege.

    BY HILARY BRUMBERGRising sophomores, juniors

    and seniors elected class offi cers for the 2010-2011 school year last month.

    Molly Doris-Pierce, a former vice president, will be the Class of 2011 president. The vice presi-dents will be returning offi cers Kevin Barisano, Emily Cetlin and Amy Ren, with Tiffany Chen.

    Student Faculty Administra-tion representatives will be Jared

    Students elect next years offi cers after assemblyKalow, Emma Leader and Dylan Wolff, with Ana Mijailovic as the alternate.

    The Class of 2012 elected Jon Paul Roby as its class president, with Stephanie Brown, Ber-nard McSally, Diana Sapashnik, Brooke Stearns and Hansen Yang as vice presidents.

    There was a tie for the fourth spot, so there will be fi ve vice presidents, instead of the usual four.

    Shelton Cochran and Allison Wu will return as SFA represen-tatives with Caleb Bromberg. Joanna Saikali will be next years alternate.

    The Class of 2013 re-elected Carl Whitham as its president and reelected Ivan McGovern, Caroline Nunberg and Justin Piselli as its vice presidents.

    It also elected Shelly Altman and Mike Safran as vice presi-dents. Like for the Class of 2012,

    the rising sophomore class will have fi ve vice presidents due to a tie for the fourth spot.

    SFA members will be Jordan Ecker, Felege Gebru and Winston Huang, with Ryne Duffy as the alternate.

    Junior Remi Torracinta will return as this schools School Committee representative.

    The School Council repre-sentatives will be junior Doris Vincent and sophomores Mad-

    eline Cetlin, Rosie Sokolov and Allison Wu.

    This year, the speeches for the class elections were of a very high standard, according to math teacher Cheryll-Anne Lane, who organizes the elections with math teacher Tracey Stewart.

    I dont know if its the new school or what it is, but there seems to be a renewed interest, especially in the current sopho-more class, Lane said.

    on campus With todays technology, its easy to stay in touch, said Mul-len-Neem, who attends Boston University. Its very possible.

    Moss-Hawkins deferred her acceptance to Brown University to take a gap year with the Think-ing Beyond Borders program.

    The best part of gap year for me was the new experiences. I couldnt imagine going to school for four more years. I feel I have a lot more passion and direction.

    She said she recommends ap-plying to college before leaving for a gap year.

    BY PERRIN STEINUsing a variety of skits, the

    Improbable Players, a group of recovering addicts from Boston, educated students about drugs and alcohol B-block, Tuesday, June 1.

    To begin the presentation, Chris, an alcoholic who has been in recovery for 12 years, dressed up as a stereotypical drunk. She put on a ragged coat and gloves and explained why she was wearing each piece in a drunken voice.

    After her brief introduction, Chris, Adam, and Robin 97

    introduced themselves. If you thought that was what an alco-holic or an addict looks like, you would be wrong because were all alcoholics, Chris said as she took off her costume.

    One of the skits the Improb-able Players presented showed the cycle alcoholics go through, which make it very diffi cult for them to quit. Robin and Chris took turns miming the part of Charlie, a drunk, and Adam interpreted their actions for the audience.

    Former addicts explain perils of drugsLater on in the presentation,

    Robin and Chris did a scene showing that people have trouble recognizing addiction in them-selves, and they find ways to rationalize their behavior.

    Robin was sitting on a bench smoking marijuana when Chris sat down next to her and began to drink beer. Each one tells the other that they will turn out to be a junkie and their discussion progressed into a fi ght.

    Youre going to end up home-less and sitting in a fi lthy ally shooting up all the time, Chris said.

    continued from page 1member of the Science Team

    and Environmental Club and managed varsity cross country.

    Donohue presented Sam Shames with the Dickinson Me-morial Award. The award is for a senior boy who demonstrates great improvement in athletic competition, sportsmanship, character and skill. Shames was a co-captain of varsity wrestling for two years, and was a Massachu-setts All-State Champion and an All-American. He also worked as a Graphic Communications work study student.

    Harris presented the Gary El-liott Prize for the Performing Arts to Vona. As an active member of Theatre Ink, Vona has been involved in performances here since his freshman year. He also performed with Newton Summer Stage and Theatre Ink on Wheels, a performance troupe that travels to nursing homes to perform.

    Leah Cepko presented the Helene Breivogel Award for citi-zenship, sportsmanship and im-provement to Hannah Jellinek.

    A captain of varsity ice hockey her senior year, Jellinek also par-ticipated in soccer, lacrosse and outdoor track, all at the varsity level. She was also a member of the Leadership class and a career center aide, and she traveled to New Orleans with Habitat for Humanity in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

    Kristie Grimes-Mallard pre-sented Jackson with the Margaret South Award for courtesy, cour-age and unselfi sh enthusiasm.

    Jackson was a member of the

    Student Faculty Administration and Mentors in Violence Preven-tion and was a PAWS mediator and a Peer Tutor.

    She was also on the alpine skiing team and was a captain of varsity outdoor track and varsity soccer.

    Scott Giusti presented the Rotary Club William Rockwell Memorial Award to Alicia Dow.

    Dow is an Early Education and Care major, and has been involved with the program since her freshman year. She is also a youth leader at her church and was a teachers assistant in a freshman math class.

    Caeden Brynie presented Kate Gallagher with the Wendell R. Bauckman Award.

    This year, Gallagher helped or-ganize a benefi t concert to fund-raise for a local family. She was a member of the Jubilee and Family Singers and was a teachers as-sistant in a chemistry class.

    Kim Gilles presented the Len-ny Zakim/PTSO Human Rights Award to Cepko and Jackie As-sar.

    Assar was a founding member of Minga, a youth non-profi t or-ganization that speads awareness about the child sex trade. She is also a head delegate in Model United Nations and a mentor in Newtons Big Brother/Big Sister organization.

    Cepko was a member of the Student Faculty Administration and was a Peer Mentor and a Guidance Aide. She was a presi-dent of the Microcredit Club and volunteered as an English as a Second Language tutor.

    Envirothon concludes Science Teams yearBY KAYLA SHORE

    Ending the season on a good note, the Science Team competed in the Massachusetts Envirothon Thursday, May 13, according to science teacher Ann Dannen-berg, adviser of the team with science teachers Barbara Gibson and Peter Hamel.

    This schools team did not place overall out of the 40 teams from around the state at the En-virothon. However, it received fourth places in the Environ-mental Issues presentation and Wildlife Field Station elements of the competition.

    Dannenberg said she is partic-ularly pleased with the presenta-tion that focused on groundwater in Newton. The students had lots of intelligent things to say. All the information they had collected was seamlessly integrated into a pursuasive whole.

    The Envirothon is an annual competition aimed to test stu-dents knowledge of wildlife, forestry, soils, water and current environmental issues. Each team designates one of the fi ve team members to be an expert on a particular topic.

    Dannenberg attributed some of the teams success to the learn-ing experience it had last year, when it placed second overall in the Envirothon. Ligerbots end season with informal eventBY MALINI GANDHI

    To end its season, the Liger-bots participated in the Bean-town Blitz, an informal robotics competition, Saturday, May 22, according to freshman Evan Nitkin.

    The Ligerbots came in 33rd out of the 36 teams. But the teams goal was to have fun, Nitkin said. In that aspect, we performed great.

    Like the other robotics com-petitions the Ligerbots have participated in this year, robots competed in Breakaway, which is similar to soccer because the robots try to score as many points as possible in two and a half minutes. In the Beantown Blitz, however, a golden soccer ball was added to the game play, which was worth twice the normal amount of points when scored, according to Nitkin.

    The Beantown Blitz allowed newer Ligerbots members to gain experience in a more relaxed atmosphere, he said. As many students had not driven the robot in past competitions, the Blitz allowed everyone on the team a chance to be on the drive team, according to Nitkin.

    Though the robot will not compete in any further events, the teams work is far from over, according to Newton South ro-botics teacher Jennifer Stephens, a coach.

    The remainder of the year will consist primarily of various fundraising events and working on the business side of the team, she said.

    in brief

    on campus

  • BY KATE LEWISZombies, superheroes and

    offbeat sketches were all part and parcel of Nitrous Oxide, Theatre Inks sketch comedy troupe, which performed May 26 and 28 at 7:30 p.m. in the little theatre.

    The troupe of 10 actors, including seniors Chris An-nas-Lee, Jordan Ascher and Seth Simons, who directed the troupe, put on a delightfully energetic show, comprised entirely of student-written sketches that kept audiences laughing throughout.

    One recurring sketch fol-lowed the adventures of Turbo-Lass, a vanquisher of foulness played by senior Ingrid Rudie, and her morose sidekick, Larry, played by sophomore Graham Techler.

    Throughout the show, Tur-boLass and Larry appeared to assist a woman, portrayed by senior Melissa Lozada-Oliva, with several simple tasks.

    Although TurboLass proved

    arts Wednesday, June 9, 20104 Newtonite, Newton North

    Festival displaysstudent work

    Pops Night commemorates years end

    Nitrous Oxide delivers laughs

    BY PERRIN STEINCabaret Troupe presented

    its second concert of the year, Shine, in Lasker Auditorium Friday, May 14.

    Together, 18 students per-formed songs from musicals writ-ten after 1995, because contem-porary and new musical theatre relates more to the young adult audience, according to senior Hayley Travers, junior Kelly Mc-Intyre and sophomore Jon Paul Roby, the directors.

    The troupe also performed a concert in January and sang a musical theatre medley in Kiss the Stage Friday, June 4.

    To open the show, the entire troupe sang Coasting from the musical Edges. Students alter-nated singing parts of the piece as solos and duets. During the chorus, everyone joined together in a loud, energetic harmony.

    As the piece concluded, the harmony broke into a round, repeating different phrases from the chorus.

    Next, sophomore Emily Paley performed Oh Henry by Mi-chael Kooman and Christopher Diamond. This piece was hi-larious, and Paleys sweet, clear voice and funny gestures caused the audience to laugh throughout her performance.

    At the beginning of the piece, it seemed like Paley was singing about the end of a romantic rela-tionship. As the piece continued, it became clear that she was actually singing about choos-ing a candy bar from a vending machine.

    To conclude the piece, she mimed hitting the vending ma-chine as if the candy was stuck. She then left the stage on the verge of tears because, despite her dramatic ode about her love and need for a candy bar, she nev-er received what she wanted.

    For the second to last piece of the show, all the seniors came on stage to perform Bring Me to Light from the musical Violet. Ryan Vona began the song with a hopeful, questioning voice asking Will you bring me to the light?

    During Vonas solo, Travers began subtly humming in the background. The other seniors followed Travers lead, and the humming drowned out Vona as he concluded his solo.

    For the rest of the piece, they all sang together and gestured to liven up the song.

    As the song concluded, the rest of the cast joined them on stage for the fi nal piece Light from Next to Normal, which formed a cohesive transition with the preceding number.

    Freshman Madeline Murphy took the center of the stage and sang the fi rst part of this song. Instead of asking for light, as Vona did, Murphys assured voice made statements such as, We need some light.

    The cast then alternated be-tween a soloist and the entire group singing portions of the song. As the piece progressed, the troupe became louder and more forceful. Everyone blended together repeating the fi nal line there will be light until all the stage lights abruptly brightened, giving the cast the light they sang about.

    Overall, Cabaret Troupes sec-ond performance was fi lled with fun and energetic songs.

    BY KATE LEWISTen-minute plays written,

    directed and performed entirely by students were presented in the third annual Playwrights Festival, May 27 and 29 in the little theatre.

    The fi rst play, Home by se-nior Nathan Harris, told the story of William, an idealistic American solider, and Ana, a young woman attached to her home in Poland. As the couple prepares to move to America, William tries to make her happy with their new life together.

    The Incident with the Mar-garine by junior Skylar Fox was funny and quirky, and centered on a meeting between two moth-ers, Patrice and Joanna, in the aftermath of an allergic reaction borne from Joannas cupcakes.

    As Patrice, senior Laura Swa-ger was nervous, tidy to a fault and prone to outrageous panic and overreaction, while sopho-more Emma Weisberg portrayed a contrasting Joanna.

    Next was Carousel by senior Louis Loftus, which featured ju-nior Justin Phillips as a college professor and freshman Greta Schindler as Ellie, a student.

    This play touched deeply on themes of life and its meaning, as the professor desperately tried to affect Ellie with his philosophies

    to be a rather useless superhero, Rudie still portrayed her as an energetic character, excited to fi ght off evil. In contrast, Techler portrayed a mopey and depressed sidekick as Larry.

    Many sketches began as ordi-nary scenes, but then took bizarre and hilarious turns that added to the shows absurd nature.

    For example, in one sketch, senior Jen Diamond and junior Derek Butterton played lost lov-ers who meet for dinner to catch up on life, but the scene took a turn for the absurd as they began violently munching on a corpse left on their dinner table.

    In another such sketch, But-terton was warned that a hitman was after him. After fearing for his life, the hitman, played by Techler, gave Butterton a light smack and let him off with a warninga literal hit man.

    Such ridiculous twists demon-strated the creativity of the sketch writers and kept the audience expecting the unexpected as the evening went on.

    In another scene, which in-volved four tough guys showing off their muscles, the word over-

    and urged to her to make a con-nection between his lessons and the world around her.

    In The Antique Shop by senior Chris Annas-Lee, a mys-terious story kept the audience enthralled by a bizarre antique shop where Leo, played by Loftus, has been doomed to spend the rest of his days.

    In the play, three characters from various times and places in the world entered the shop and left with a letter from the trapped Leo to his family.

    The last visitor, Marc, played by junior John MacGaffey, had collected Leos letters.

    Unlike his predecessors, he knew the mysterious nature of the shop.

    He urged Leo to let him stay in hopes of reuniting with his lost lover.

    MacGaffeys desperate pleas wrenched at the hearts of the audience. Leo watched helplessly as Marc, like other visitors to the shop, was torn away and sent back to his own time.

    Karman Line by senior Seth Simons dealt with a scenario in which the world is ended by a sci-entifi c plan to destroy the sun.

    The play switched between different characters preparing to live underground, including a photographer and librarian, a couple of scientists, an elderly woman and a scholarly man.

    The next play, Salvation by junior Derek Butterton, inter-mingled a comedic plot about genetically altered petting-zoo animals taking over the world with a dramatic story of tensions between a father and daughter.

    The Good News/Pastoral by senior Jordan Ascher also in-volved the theme of familial ten-sion as well as the supernatural, as a young man was greeted by his mother and grandfather from beyond the grave.

    Senior Joella Tepper played the young mans mother as ca-sual, quick-witted and light-hearted, but her mood turned dark when she encouraged her son to take his own life and move on from the world to be with her in heaven.

    The last play, The Curator by senior Jen Diamond, told the story of Hugo and May, two recent divorcees having trouble moving on from married life.

    When the show was over, the eight playwrights took the stage for a brief question-and-answer period, in which they discussed their inspirations, the writing and editing process and the evolution of their plays.

    The Playwrights Festival was truly a wonderful way to show-case the hard work and dedica-tion of students as their plays went from the page to the stage.

    compensation was projected on the wall in small print.

    Many other sketches were accentuated by music that add-ed to the mood of the scene.

    In one sketch, senior Na-than Harris played an ominous tune on the piano as Louis Loftus, also a senior, cracked under pressure and confessed shady activities to a cuddly teddy bear. The piano music heightened the comic intensity of the scene.

    Another musical sketch fea-tured Ascher at the piano, as he and Loftus sang a duet about bequeathing all of the worlds problems to their children, in hopes that maybe our chil-dren wont be quite as lazy.

    The final scene was also a song, as the actors mock-struggled to fi nd an adequate ending to the show and decid-ed to perform a whole-group musical number entitled Deus Sketch Machina.

    Altogether, Nitrous Oxide was a hilarious evening of com-edy and a tribute to the creativ-ity and imaginative ideas of hardworking students.

    Gaby Perez-Dietz

    Carousel: Junior Justin Phillips, playing a college professor, implores his students to understand the meaning of life.

    Troupepresents Shine

    BY KATE LEWISPops Night, which took place

    Thursday, May 20 in the cafeteria, was a fun and exciting evening to celebrate a successful year in the music department.

    After sharing a delicious pot-luck dinner with friends and family, over 200 musicians in various groups gave a delightful performance.

    These groups included Brass Ensemble, Orchestra, Wind En-semble, Symphonic Band, Jubilee

    Singers, Jazz Ensemble, Family Singers and Concert Choir.

    Highlights of the evening in-cluded a medley of songs from the musicial Wicked, performed by Orchestra, and tunes from The Lion King and The Incredibles, which the Wind Ensemble and Symphonic Band played.

    The familiar music was en-joyable to the audience and was played adeptly by the musi-cians.

    Another highlight was the Jubilee Singers rendition of Amanda Franklin and Sheldon

    Reids Around You, in which ju-nior Kelly McIntyre sang a solo.

    McIntyre belted her impres-sive high notes and the audience was fl oored by her strong and beautiful voice.

    Preceding the final act, Or-chestra director Adam Grossman said a few worlds acknowledging the tremendous career of Richard Travers, the director of Family Singers and Concert Choir, who is retiring this year.

    Then, Family Singers and Concert Choir combined to sing several songs from the musi-

    cal In the Heights. Soloists included seniors Bohan Leng, Elliot Raff, Laura Swager, Joella Tepper, Ryan Vona and junior Victoria Mirrer.

    Their performance, which featured rapping and singing in Spanish, was incredibly energetic and a fi tting tribute to Travers many years as a music teacher at this school.

    Altogether, Pops Night was a great way to wrap up a year of wonderful music at Newton North, and the evening was thor-oughly enjoyed by many.

    review review

    review

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  • fi le photo

    Creativity: Junior Mercer Gary was awarded second place in the 56th annual Heintzelman Awards.

    56th Heintzelman Awardhonors creative writing

    French students raise awareness for Burkina Fasolation work in agriculture, senior Ingrid Rudie said.

    Its very important, but its very diffi cult because its land-locked, she said.

    The people of Burkina Faso really rely on the help of other countries.

    According to senior Camilla Shearman, 50 percent of the people in Burkina Faso live below the poverty line. Its barely liv-able, she said.

    The crops that you can grow because of the climate, you cant eat. So theyre not self-suffi-cient.

    To give students a better vi-sual sense of the poverty, senior Naomi Genuth showed pictures of a school in Burkina Faso.

    If you think Newton North is bad, imagine going to school in that,. she said.

    In Burkina Faso, 25 percent of the population is literate, accord-

    ing to senior Remy LaFlamme. Primary school, which includes ages seven to 12, is mandatory. Only about 10 percent of those students continue on to second-ary school, she said.

    Less than one percent of all youth attend a university, most of whom have to drop out because they do not have the funds to con-tinue, according to LaFlamme.

    Honors French literature stu-dents write letters in French to

    students at a school in Burkina Faso, who write back, according to senior Lucy Abbot. Its really cool, she said.

    What we are doing will hope-fully increase the literacy rate and help them get better jobs.

    Senior Nik Klebanov urged attendants to donate money that would go towards building the well by saying, The important thing is that for us, $1 isnt very much. But for them, its a lot.

    fi le photo

    Car crash: This wrecked car was on display in 2007 outside the building to show students the dangers of drinking and driving.

    SurvivetheDriveteaches teen drivers

    her fi rst communion, her confi r-mation, and it had always been assumed that one day the family would drive this road together to her wedding, Gary wrote.

    When her mother passed away and her father moved into a nursing home, the main char-acter and her siblings stopped going to church. She still drove to church every Sunday, but never went inside because actually sitting in a pew alone seemed impossible, Gary wrote.

    One Sunday, the main char-acter vowed that she would go inside the church. She noticed the bride in the wedding that was taking place looked startlingly like herself and her mother.

    In the end, the main character could not bring herself to go in-side the church.

    The second part, titled Third Times a Charm, tells about a man, Hal, who walked out on his family when his daughter was fi ve. He is trying to decide whether to attend his daughter Lizas wedding, but feels it will cause drama and upset his ex-wife Margie.

    As soon as he walked through those doors, it would stop being Lizas happiest day and start being a careful tracking and analysis of Hals presence. Gary wrote. He would be airing the dirty laundry of the past in

    public, and though most of their friends had already seen it, to watch them seeing it hanging on the clothesline would be too much for Margie.

    Liza would miss him, and he knew his absence would be noted, but perhaps not going was the lesser of two evils.

    Like the main character in the fi rst part, Hal decided not to go into the church.

    The main character of the fi nal section, titled Something, is a young priest who tried to revive a dying congregation.

    His efforts did not pay off, and after a year a church employee shut down the congregation.

    He was tired, Gary wrote. Physically depleted from all the care he had given his congrega-tion of ten over the past twelve months. His faith was begin-ning to dwindle, his light was tarnished. He hardly recognized the shell of a face he saw in the mirror, hollow without his hope-ful soul behind it.

    Fabian said that Garys story has an incredible nature and is incredibly subtle in what it is try-ing to do, but its still effective, Fabian said.

    The fi rst place winner, Lee, read her work, which is untitled. It tells the narrative of a day in the life of a confused high school student.

    BY HILARY BRUMBERGTo honor creative student

    work, the English Department and the Heintzelman Trustees presented Newton North junior Mercer Gary and Newton South senior Alice Lee with the 56th annual M. Roland Heintzelman Memorial Awards, according to English department head Tom Fabian.

    Monday, May 20, the win-ners read their pieces in the fi lm lecture hall. This is a very great day, Fabian said. It is one of the rare occasions when we get together cross-town.

    The award is given in memory of M. Roland Heintzelman, who taught at this school and died in his early thirties, said Fabian.

    According to Fabian, approxi-mately 100 pieces of creative writing were submitted for the award. These were narrowed down to 23 fi nalists.

    The Heintzelman Trustees Committee met and picked the fi rst and second place winners, Fabian said.

    Garys work, titled Sunday,a short story told in three parts, was awarded second prize.

    The fi rst section, Chance of Rain, tells the story of a young woman who went to church with her family for the whole begin-ning of her life. They had driven in that manner every Sunday, to

    crash themselves. Even modern cars are not all that protective, Green said.

    People call car crashes ac-cidents because there is no conscious wrongdoing, he said. The crashers and friends say it wasnt their fault.

    However, the forensic investi-gations show there is always an error that caused the collision, according to Green.

    Of all the bad things we would hope would not affect our childrendrugs, alcohol, sexu-ally transmitted diseases, preg-nancy, discrimination, war, crime, violence and abuse car crashes are statistically and kinetically the most dangerous, he said.

    We hope that this hour out of this school day will make a useful impression.

    In the United States, there are approximately six million car crashes each year, leading to three million emergency room visits and over 40,000 deaths, according to Green.

    Statistics arent numbers, they are people, he said.

    The program was sponsored by the Northeast Section of the Society of Automotive Engi-neers.

    BY HILARY BRUMBERGTo educate inexperienced

    teenage drivers about the effects of inattentive driving, Survive-theDrive presented to students in the fi lm lecture hall Monday, May 24.

    SurvivetheDrive has ad-dressed over 65,000 high school students about driver safety awareness, according to presi-dent Bob Green.

    When beginning their life-time of driving, youthful drivers are vulnerable, Green said.

    Beyond passing the drivers test, our kids, novice drivers, need to know how easy it is to wreck a car, how much trouble it is, how bad it can be and be given some strategies to stay out of trouble.

    This isnt self-explanatory. These students are vulnerable and need to understand the haz-ards, Green said.

    Every crash event that ever happened was all of a sudden and tremendously violent.

    These are all good kids. No one needs this violence. We have to deal in facts.

    What you hit or what hits you is more than a car crash-ing. Cars arent smart enough to

    on campusWednesday, June 9, 2010 Newton North, Newtonite 5

    BY HILARY BRUMBERGTo raise awareness about the

    poverty of Burkina Faso and money to build a well in the vil-lage of Yako, students from the Honors French literature class presented during Burkina Faso Day Thursday, May 27, in the fi lm lecture hall, said senior Will Zhang.

    The people of Burkina Faso need the new well because about 75 percent of the working popu-

  • advertisement Wednesday, June 9, 20106 Newtonite, Newton North

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    STRIVE FOR EXCELLENCE

    Newton Teachers AssociationShira Bleicher

    Photos by Shira Bleicher

  • Wednesday, June 9, 2010 Newton North, Newtonite 7

    Teddy Wenneker

    Ill miss the kids and Ill miss getting to see them inside and outside of school, says English teacher Inez Dover.

    Inez Dover says she loves students energyBY JAY KRIEGER

    Teaching doesnt always happen in the classroom and doesnt always involve reading or writing, but making connec-tions with students and understanding and respecting students needs, said English teacher Inez Dover.

    Dover grew up in Chicago, Illinois and attended John Marshall Harlan High School, graduating in 1969. After high school she attended Boston University, earning a bachelors degree in Arts and Science and graduate degrees in theater arts, speech and education.

    I originally wanted to be an actress, but people told me that I would end up wait-ing tables and go hungry. I liked teaching, thats why I double majored in education, she said.

    Dover started teaching at Newton North in 1973, in time for the opening of the cur-rent building. Mary Lanigan, the depart-ment head, as well as principal Richard Mechem hired her.

    My fi rst day of teaching was scary and exciting at the same time; I thought what am I getting myself into here? she said.

    In 1975, Dover helped to start the fi rst girls track team at Newton North, and soon pursued her love of theatre by direct-ing plays.

    Dover later went on to teach every cur-riculum level and several electives includ-ing Mechanics of Writing, Propaganda Techniques, Creative Writing, Harlem Renaissance, Speech, Leadership and Theatre Arts.

    I love teaching the freshmen and se-niors because the freshmen are impres-sionable and energetic, while the seniors are more laid back, but still willing to learn about life.

    There is a nice contrast in maturity between the freshmen and seniors, Do-ver said.

    Dover said the welcoming community of Newton North helped her to fi t in and fi nd a place when she fi rst started teach-ing.

    When I fi rst came to North I didnt have a lot of experience other than student teaching. I was welcomed into a very car-ing community. My department felt like a real family, she said.

    English department head Tom Fabian said, Ms. Dover is in many ways not only a good teacher, but also brings a voice to this school and in many ways acts as our conscience as a faculty member.

    She came here in 1973we lived in a very different country and world then, he said. I think if you look over the passage of a 37-year career, shes been a presence in this building that has helped us to bet-ter understand ourselves and the world we live in.

    Former English department head Bren-da Keegan knows Dover as a brilliant, highly energetic and creative person.

    She brings a special insight to litera-ture both from the sense of how drama works on stage and from the sense of living in different cultures, Keegan said.

    Dover was tremendously kind and helped Keegan on a personal level, she said.

    When this club had to shut down for repair, my daughter couldnt hold her bridal shower there, but Dover offered to do it in her backyard, and it was better there than anywhere else, Keegan said.

    She has taken care of so many people in the school and community, and she has been a remarkable force in making people rethink their ideas, she said.

    English Teacher Nancy Kranes said Dovers many qualities will be missed at Newton North.

    The energy that she has brought to make this school vibrant, the laughter she brings to spread joy, and the love in which she embraces her students, faculty and staff are all what make her such an amazing person, Kranes said.

    A moment that defi ned teaching for Dover was when a student came back to visit after graduating.

    This student gave me a hard time in class, though when she came back, she told me that I was her favorite teacher. After that visit, I realized that students may not understand until later in life that teachers have a profound impact on their life, she said.

    Another student who Dover coached 30

    years ago recently contacted her to update her on her life and to let her know that she had impacted her life.

    There are little things that you do with students that you may never know the im-pact until later in life, Dover said.

    All three of Dovers children gradu-ated North as well as nephews and close personal friends.

    The lowest point in education for Dover was when the school experienced a num-ber of cuts. We couldnt hire new teachers, cutting back on resources. It felt as though the community felt that educators werent important, and I feel that we make the community, she said.

    Dover took a three-year leave of ab-sence in 1989. She worked at the Effi cacy Institute as an Educational Consultant.

    Dovers position as director of human and civil rights was reduced, and she said it felt as though the school didnt feel that human and civil rights were important.

    Dover said she hopes that students will enjoy learning, rather than just seeking good grades out of competition, as our motto says that learning sustains the hu-man spirit.

    The competitiveness to get into col-leges and universities really has taken the joy out of learning, she said. I think that students have also lost respect for teachers, and they are more about me, myself and I.

    What I love about teaching is the stu-dents energy, the bonds and relationships I have made at North, and the wonderful feeling of having students who didnt start the year enjoying school, but now do. I love teaching young adultsI often wonder how elementary teachers teach the little kids. I guess they wonder how we deal with the older ones, she said.

    Dover has had a large impact on the theater program at North as well, hav-ing directed over 30 plays. More recent productions include A Streetcar Named Desire, A View from a Bridge, A Raisin in the Sun, Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992, and for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf.

    According to Adam Brown, director of Theatre Ink, what makes Dovers shows special is she is such a giving director. She gives students opportunities and freedoms to own their work as artists and guide themselves with that, Brown said.

    She can bring them together and let them rise to higher levels and pushes them to reach their full potential.

    Her honesty as an artist is what they need, and she really cares about peopleher team, her cast and her crew, he said.

    In addition to teaching English and di-recting, Dover was director of civil rights, which entailed her working with students and teachers on matters of human and civil rights.

    I developed the Human Rights Board and the Black Leadership Advisory Coun-cil, Dover said.

    I organized public speakers and re-sources to come and speak to students as well as dealing with problems between students and faculty, she said.

    The development of the Leadership class helped Dover see that Newton North is a unique and diverse environment, she said.

    Its a class that only some colleges have that deals with gender, class, race, sexual orientationall topics that society doesnt like to discuss. Its the most rewarding part of working at North, she said.

    English teacher Peter Goddard teaches Leadership with Dover, and said he be-lieves that her contributions to Leadership class are exceptional, and describes Dover as warm, giving and someone who has a big heart.

    He said that she is an extraordinary teacher because of her willingness to go into ideological and personal areas that others would not be willing to go into and because of her fearlessness in teaching and directing, said Goddard.

    She is very strong in spontaneous mo-ments. One of the things that class brings up are hot-button topicsshe can be in the moment and make them feel uncomfort-able in a good way and then bring them out of the moment comfortably, he said.

    Goddard has gone to New Orleans with Dover and their Leadership students and has spent many valuable moments with

    her, he said.I remember the fi rst time we went to

    New Orleans and we were staying with col-lege kids in the AmeriCorps, and they were not the friendliest folks. One of the things we had to do was meal duty, and the kids had pathetic offerings, Goddard said.

    One day Ms. Dover had enough, so she got up early in the morning with a few other students and made exceptional waffl es, eggs, biscuits and bacon, he said, adding with a laugh, The college kids were a lot nicer afterwards.

    She is defi nitely someone that I will miss, Goddard said.

    Graphics teacher Tom Donnellan said he is thankful to be able to call her my friend.

    She has always been a go-to person when I was in time of need, he said.

    As a young teacher, I was lucky enough to work with Inez in a summer program. Inez taught me the essentials of working with students on a personal level, said Donnellan.

    After her fi rst year of retirement, Dover plans to teach at a junior college, start the Legacy Black Scholars Program, which deals with the achievement of African American students, continue to direct plays at North and teach a course in edu-cation.

    Ill miss the kids and relationships that I have made with students, and Ill miss getting to see them inside and outside of school, she said.

    retirements

  • retirements Wednesday, June 9, 20108 Newtonite, Newton North

    Teddy Wenneker

    I like students to be involved, says Spanish teacher Carol Seitz. Just sitting and listening to the teacher is boring,

    Jacob Schwartz

    History has always been my hobby, my love, says history teacher John Rob Stark.

    Carol Seitz keeps students engaged in classBY PERRIN STEIN

    I loved languages from the fi rst moment I took Latin as a freshman in high school, said Spanish teacher Carol Seitz, who has taught Spanish for 40 years and taught French for 25 years.

    Having grown up in Wheeling, West Virginia, Seitz didnt have a chance to begin taking languages until she started Triadelphia High School in 1962.

    She went on to attend West Virginia University because her grandfather was a professor there. Seitz majored in French, but began taking Spanish as a sophomore. She continued to study both of these subjects until her graduation in 1970.

    Right before graduation, Seitz went on a French exchange pro-gram with a few other students. It was the fi rst exchange that West Virginia University went on, and it changed my life. I real-ized there was a lot to see in the world, and I wasnt going to end up staying in West Virginia for the rest of my lifeI had to go see the world, Seitz said.

    This was a somewhat radical decision because most people in West Virginia in the 70s didnt travel much or move very far from where they grew up, accord-ing to Seitz.

    Because she wanted to see the world, Seitz decided to move to Boston with her college room-mate, Joyce Plotkin.

    Seitz moved to Boston with the hopes of going into publish-ing, but she went into teaching instead.

    She was hired by Bigelow principal Robert Frost in 1970. Despite my lack of experience, I was hired because I could teach both French and Spanish, Seitz said. I had to develop the Span-ish curriculum at Bigelow, and I wasnt even given a classroom,

    grants, which will help them make their classes more inter-esting, she said. Spanish teacher Juanita ONeill has worked with Seitz on grants that utilize music in the classroom.

    Sra. Seitz is always looking for new ways to engage her stu-dents, and she found music to be one of these ways, ONeill said.

    World language department head Nancy Marrinucci met Seitz when Marrinucci began teaching at this school 10 years ago.

    I will really miss her enthu-siasm and presence in the world language department, said Mar-rinucci.

    Spanish teacher Marla Glaskin fondly recalls meeting Seitz eight years ago when Glaskin began teaching at this school.

    She told me that we would be sharing a classroom and that we could decorate it together. For me, this was a warm welcome into the world language depart-ment, Glaskin recalled.

    Because they taught the same Spanish II class for many years, Glaskin said she has come to know Seitz well. Shes very unique, Glaskin said. Lets face ithow often do you meet some-one who knits her own sweaters and designs websites? Never, except for Sra. Seitz.

    Even though she is leaving a lot behind, Seitz said she has many plans for her retirement. She will be taking care of her grandchildren on Fridays, taking a more active role as chair of the Woburn Historical Commission and as a trustee of the Woburn Public Library, singing in the womens Cantilina Chorale in Arlington and being the president of her knitting guild.

    As Marrinucci said, the fac-ulty at North will miss Sra. Seitz both as a friend and as a col-league.

    so I had to conduct my classes in the typing room.

    One day during Seitzs fi rst year of teaching, she decided to go see a publishing house with her friend who had an interview there. The publishing house had a lot of people sitting around in offices working. It looked re-ally boring, and I realized that I would rather be in my classroom playing with my kids. This made me realize I was meant to be a teacher, Seitz recalled.

    Due to declining enrollment, Seitz was moved to Newton North in 1984. Bigelow was about to close, and the Newton Public School system was moving

    around a lot of teachers including Seitz, she said.

    As she became better at French and Spanish and began to teach at higher levels, Seitz decided to concentrate on Spanish because she often confused the two lan-guages.

    I realized that if I wanted to keep getting better at languages, and if I wanted to be best able to help my students, I would have to give up one of the languages I taught. I gave up French with regret, but in the end, it was the right decision.

    During her time at this school, Seitz has led the Spanish ex-change twice. I had been to

    Spain in 1974, but I really wanted to go back because its important to have a connection with the country you are teaching about, Seitz said. She went to Madrid in 1992 and Burgos in 2006.

    In 1996, several years after leading the Spanish exchange to Madrid, Seitz received the Elicker Award for Excellence in Teaching, which teachers win for having a deep appreciation and knowledge of a subject matter, teaching that stretches the mind of students and standards for performance that inspire excel-lence, according to the criteria for the award.

    It was wonderful to hear all these nice things people had to say about me. It showed me that people really do care about my teaching, Seitz said.

    Seitz said she breaks her class into fi ve or six parts: music of the week (a pop song Seitz plays at the beginning of each class), grammar, vocabulary, reading and a hands-on activity.

    I like students to be involved. Just sitting and listening to the teacher is boring, so Ive tried to keep adapting things to make them more interesting and hope-fully, easier for students to under-stand, Seitz said.

    Seitz has remained interested in teaching by adapting her cur-riculum over time, she said. She focuses on using technology as a learning tool. To do this, Seitz has created Powerpoint presentations to explain complicated gram-mar ideas, developed a Moodle project in her junior class and taken a course on design, so she can make worksheets look more inviting. I try to remember that if Im bored, my students will be bored, Seitz said.

    Over the years, Seitz has worked with other members of the Spanish department on

    John Rob Stark makes students feel good about schoolBY KATE LEWIS

    The way I see it, the good teachers are those who, no mat-ter what happens during the day, they come back the next day to try it again, said history teacher John Rob Stark.

    For over 20 years, Stark has been coming back the next day to teach history at Newton North, bringing his extensive knowl-edge of the subject to countless students.

    According to Stark, he has taught every single history class there is, excluding a few senior electives, in his time at North, including AP European History, Caribbean Civilizations and U.S. History.

    A graduate of Boston English High School and the University of New Hampshire, Stark originally worked in New Hampshire as a carpenter, until his wife con-vinced him to pursue a career in education.

    They moved to Massachusetts, where Stark taught carpentry and history at Meadowbrook and F.A. Day junior high schools.

    When Day became a middle school, he switched to Newton North and became a full-time history teacher. History has al-ways been my hobby, my love, he said.

    On my fi rst day at Newton North, I taught three sections of Curriculum I U.S. History and two sections of Curriculum II, he said. In those days, students were much more free to create their own curriculum and their own view of how to present his-tory.

    I vividly remember that kids werent quite so stressed. Today,

    kids are more concerned with grades, testing, where theyre going to school.

    My philosophy of life is that if you do well and as best you can today, tomorrow takes care of itself.

    Back then, 20 kids would come back during X-block to talk about what was going on in the classroom. Now kids only come by to ask about a grade or make up a test, Stark said. I miss that.

    Additionally, Stark said he thinks there is now a tendency for courses to be too standardized.

    There is a tendency in edu-cation now for everything to be standardized, Stark said.

    Everybody needs to be on the same page, teaching the same curriculum. If that contin-ues, Newton North will become the best mediocre school in the country.

    Stark cites the most defi ning moments of his career as the ones when his teaching was able to make a student apply history to current events and make them think about the world around them.

    One of these moments came after President George H.W. Bush declared war on Iraq. Said Stark, A senior came into my room and yelled out, Damn you, Mr. Stark! Before your class I would have been gung-ho for the war, but after your class, I have to think about whether we should be in Iraq or not.

    Fellow history teacher An-thony Patelis said he has found working with Stark to be both a learning experience and an enjoyable one.

    On numerous occasions throughout my career, he has stuck his head into my class and made disparaging remarks about me, resulting in the kids becom-ing hysterical, Patelis said. Obviously, I had to respond in a similar fashion.

    When he is talking to one of his students in his offi ce, I usually console the student and remind them that next year, maybe they will get a history teacher who actually knows what he is talk-ing about, Patelis said. That al-ways bring a smile to Mr. Starks face.

    All jokes aside, many of Starks fellow teachers have come to re-spect Starks knowledge, teach-ing ability and strong character.

    Hes intelligent, well-read and

    politically aware, said Patelis. Intentionally or not, he became a mentor to many people in our department, myself included.

    Patelis said that he has Stark to thank for launching his own teaching career.

    I was hired because Mr. Stark stuck his neck out for me, he said. The last 11 years have been the best years of my life here at Newton North, and I owe it all to Mr. Stark.

    Jonathan Bassett, the history department head, has known Stark since Bassett started at Newton North as a teacher in 1986.

    Mr. Stark has an ability to read the class, and he is able to make all different kinds of students feel good about school,

    Bassett said. Watching him teach is just a pleasure.

    He is one of those teachers that students come back and visit. I have been told by parents how much their kids love his class, he said.

    After retiring from Newton North, Stark plans to write a historical fiction novel about Thomas Jefferson and John Adams, in addition to traveling, spending time with his family and supervising student teachers at Boston College, he said.

    I say this to young people get-ting into the teaching profession who are nervous before class, Stark said. After 34 years of teaching, that never changes.JACOB BRUNELL CONTRIBUTED TO THIS ARTICLE.

  • Wednesday, June 9, 2010 Newton North, Newtonite 9

    Teddy Wenneker

    Ive tried to share the joys that I have experienced in music with my students, says music teacher Richard Travers.

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    Richard Travers cites importance of musicBY FATEMA ZAIDI

    Richard Travers can play a jazz solo on the piano and have a friendly conversation all at the same time, according to Todd Young, fi ne and performing arts department head.

    We were playing together at a party, and he is playing the piano and just tearing it up, Young said. The bass player looks at me and nods at Mr. Travers, and then I looked at Mr. Travers and he was having a conversation with a parent. It looks so easy, said Young.

    Travers is retiring after teach-ing music in Newton for 34 years. It took a lot of hard work for Trav-ers to reach this point.

    Travers grew up in West Rox-bury and started playing piano at the age of four, playing pro-fessionally at the age of 12, he said.

    He went to Catholic Memorial High School, graduating in 1971. After graduation, he wasnt sure what to do with his background of music and coaching sports.

    My friend Dick Twomey said to me, Trav, why dont you be a music teacher? Travers said.

    His formal music education started when he was accepted to Berklee College of Music in 1971, but it did not stop there. Travers earned his masters degree in choral conducting from Boston Conservatory and began teach-ing at Weeks Junior High in 1976 after being hired by Socrates Lagios.

    Travers began to teach at New-ton North in 1983 and found his fi rst day extraordinary, he said.

    I sat at the piano and was playing parts for the singers, said Travers. Ray Smith came over and slapped my hand and

    closed the piano lid in front of the class.

    I thought to myself how dare you! but Smith said, How are they going to learn to sing if you play all their notes? said Travers. It was the wisest thing I learned; Ray Smith taught me how to teach high school sing-ers.

    Through the years, Travers has taught Family Singers, Con-cert Choir, Popular Music Since 1945, the Sisters, Vocal Ensem-ble, Tiger BeBop and Jubilee Singers.

    Some of these classes, such as Tiger BeBop and Pop Music, are of Travers own creation, and every class has an aspect that is excellent, he said.

    Preparing for a concert in class is enjoyable because we have a goal and theres a pre-scribed way to get there, Trav-ers said.

    Music teacher Sheldon Reid, who currently directs Jubilee, said he learned a wealth of infor-mation from Travers.

    Mr. Travers is easy-going and fun to be around, but serious, Reid said. He has lots of creative ideas to give students new op-portunities and always has them thinking of ways to step up their abilities.

    Reid said he knows Travers as an incredibly humble man, who also has a great depth of experience.

    According to Reid, Travers is on the job all the time, not only during school weeks, but also on the weekends when other teach-ers are relaxing at home.

    Whether hes at extra re-hearsals or singing for the vet-erans, Mr. Travers is always making sure North is represented

    positively, said Reid.Young said he is also astound-

    ed by how undeniably dedicated Travers is to his students.

    First and foremost is the care and compassion he shows to all students, Young said. In music, you have four years, so you can build a strong relationship with students. It is amazing how he has thousands of students who

    care about him.According to Young, Travers is

    a phenomenal musician, and he has got an interesting and varied skill base.

    Travers skills were recog-nized when he won the Elicker award in 1991. He was the inau-gural recipient of the prestigious teaching award.

    He felt honored to be voted on by parents, students and fac-ulty for a brand new award, but he said he was mainly in shock because receiving that award meant he had earned his place at the round table with the elite of Newton North.

    Additionally, English teacher Inez Dover honored Travers with the Human Rights award for his efforts to incorporate students of all different ethnicities, races and creeds in the music department.

    Travers cites special perfor-mances of Orffs Carmina Bura-na and Duke Ellingtons Sacred Concert as the defi ning moments of his career.

    Carmina Burana combined Newton Community Chorus and orchestra with Family Singers and Concert Choir to a sold-out Sanders Theatre, Travers said.

    In 1998, with a combined choir of 140 singers and a full jazz band, Newton North students performed Ellingtons Sacred Concert, conducted by Herb Pomeroy, who played trumpet in Ellingtons orchestra. According to Travers, the concert was cited by a Boston Globe critic as one of the top 10 jazz concerts of the year.

    Another defining moment was earlier this year, when over 100 North students played with Travers at a memorial concert for Ray Smith. Every different style of kid youd want was there, and we got up and sang the Mozart Requiem, said Travers. It rep-resents the diversity we have at Newton North.

    Tom Leonard, retired music department head, describes Trav-ers concerts to be vibrant and full of energy.

    Every single concert that was done, was done with superb preparation and always was suc-cessful on stage, said Leonard.

    Travers had the opportunity to travel to Europe 14 times with the Music Travel Club over the

    years, visiting places such as Prague, London, Dublin, Madrid and Paris with his students.

    The idea is that when they return to a country later in life, all these wonderful memories will come back: not only were they there, they performed there.

    Another defi ning moment for Travers was the Mayors Prayer Breakfast dedicated to Leonard Bernstein. Bernstein was a per-sonal friend of Henry Lasker, for whom Lasker Auditorium is named, he said.

    Travers conducted several pieces at the event, and he re-ceived a letter from Bernsteins brother Burton saying, Thank you, Mr. Travers. Rarely have I heard my brothers music sung so beautifully.

    Travers has spent 34 valuable years with his students and often marvels at how students have changed.

    I think that theyre more aware of the importance of com-municating with each other and being aware of other people who are less fortunate, said Travers.

    However, the general spirit of students has not changedthey want to be challenged, and they want to study with someone who has a deep love for the subject theyre teaching, said Travers.

    Ive tried to share the joys that I have experienced in music with my students, said Travers. I want them to truly feel and understand the incredible power of music.

    With a laugh, Travers added, After all, where else can you get over 100 teenage students to all agree on the same thing?

    What Ill miss most about North is the City of Newton and its citizens. Its an extraordinary city, and its fi lled with so many different people.

    After retirement, Travers plans to continue conducting the New-ton Community Chorus and the Fine Arts Chorale in Weymouth. He has also opened a private stu-dio in his home, and will continue to teach piano and voice. He said he will also be a guest conductor for different festivals throughout New England.

    I will get a chance to enjoy not as hectic a pace as I have had, but when it comes to music, Im in it forever, said Travers.

    retirements

  • retirements Wednesday, June 9, 201010 Newtonite, Newton North

    Ivan McGovern

    I have made good connections with a lot of students and other teachers throughout my years of working at North, says English teacher Burton Weiner. I look forward to coming to work each day.

    Burton Weiner says everyone can succeed BY JACOB BRUNELL

    English teacher and director of student teaching Burton Weiner said he enjoys teaching Curriculum II classes the most.

    It is gratifying to help kids for whom success is diffi cult, Weiner said.

    Even more than that, when a kid who doesnt enjoy school comes up to you with a big smile and says I actually liked this book, you know you have been doing your job well, Weiner continued.

    It is a great feeling when you get a call from a student years later saying, Ive become a professional actor, singer or a teacher, and you gave me the confi dence to do it.

    Born in Boston, Weiner graduated from Newton South High School in 1970 and went on to graduate from Boston University as an English major and his-tory minor.

    Later, Weiner earned his masters degree and doctorate, both from BU.

    At the same time as he was earning his masters, Weiner began at Newton North as a substitute teacher in 1975.

    That year, I actually didnt know I was working at North until two days before school began, he said.

    Weiner said he was hired at the last moment by Helen Ryan, a housemaster, he said.

    Weiner said that his fi rst year teaching was the most challenging one.

    It was a 24-hour job to get prepared for the next day of classes. At the time, there really wasnt a lot of structure at the school, so you created your own, he continued.

    However, teaching at North was and still is also incredibly exciting, Weiner said.

    You get a lot of independence, and you have the opportunity to work with great people. No two days are ever the same, said Weiner.

    I can honestly say Ive never had a bad year here. At the same time, I never thought I would be here as long as I have, he said.

    According to Weiner, it is the people at the school that make North unique and have kept him coming back all of these

    years.I have made good connections with a

    lot of students and other teachers through-out my years of working at North. I look forward to coming to work each day, Weiner said.

    At Newton North, you can be an indi-

    vidual, and it is extremely easy to make friends, explained Weiner.

    Weiner said that one of the most enjoy-able parts of every school year for him is watching seniors present their Senior English projects.

    It is incredibly rewarding, as you can see their growth as students and pride for their work, said Weiner.

    In addition to teaching at Newton North, Weiner has also held many other positions throughout his career.

    He is currently on the Board of Direc-tors of the Massachusetts Teachers Asso-ciation, as well as the Board of Directors of the Newton Teacher Residency program, and has been a visiting professor at Bridge-water State College for the past 11 years.

    Weiner has also taught classes at Bos-ton College and his alma mater, BU, and was involved with the Newton Teachers Association as the head of the teacher negotiating team for 15 years.

    The most frustrating thing about teaching is the endless battle to attain suffi cient resources to do our jobs. Its not only a Newton problem, but also a state problem and a federal problem. That is why I got involved with the teachers union, explained Weiner.

    Learning a variety of different teaching strategies is essential for reaching differ-ent types of students, said Weiner.

    Weiner also said he thinks it is essential to connect students class work with their out-of-school lives.

    Every kid can be successful, and it is our job to fi nd the most effective way to reach them, he said.

    English teacher Annie Blais said she has enjoyed working with Weiner because of his often humorous and dramatic teaching

    style, as well as his great ability to com-municate with both teachers and students in an effective manner.

    He has a great perspective on what is essential to teach and what is not. He is always able to keep his larger perspec-tive on life in the back of his mind, and he helps others to do the same in school, explained Blais.

    Blais also said that Weiner is a great storyteller and knows how to get kids interested in a text.

    According to Weiner, much has changed since he began at North more than 30 years ago.

    Most noticeably, kids are better be-haved now than when I fi rst started, he said.

    The school holds students to a higher standard, and parents are far more in-volved in students academic careers.

    Although officially retiring, Weiner will still teach part time at Newton North next year.

    The main reason why I am coming back next year is because Ms. Price prom-ised me an offi ce with an actual window in the new school. I had to come back for the window, Weiner said with a laugh.

    Adams housemaster James DOrazio said that Weiner is a great teacher and a great friend.

    He is a student of the teaching pro-fession and a mentor as well. If you feel like you are in trouble, or you are seeking advice, you can go to him no matter what the problem is, DOrazio said.

    Weiner said that he initially considered going into law, but ultimately chose edu-cation.

    In becoming a teacher, I know I made the right choice, fi nished Weiner.

    Mike,We always knew you would make a Big Splash!

    CONGRATULATIONS!Love,

    Dad, Mom, Megan, & Lizzie

  • Congratulations to Matthew

    and to all the graduating seniors from

    Newtonite Volume 88! Good luck in your new

    adventures!

    Many thanks to Helen Smith and

    Kate Shaughnessy.

    Wednesday, June 9, 2010 Newton North, Newtonite 11

    Jacob Schwartz

    Its very important that students be aware of the world, says on campus coordinator Jeanne White.

    Jeanne White says awareness is importantBY KAYLA SHORE

    Since 1983, Jeanne White has brought a little piece of the rest of the world into this school.

    As the on campus coordinator and head of the PAWS mediation program, White has brightened student life here in many ways.

    She saw the importance of community and family at Newton North, and thats what she strove for, said English teacher and friend Inez Dover.

    After 27 years here, White is retiring.

    White, born and raised in Dorchester, attended UMass Bos-ton (then State College at Boston) for a teachers degree, graduating in 1958.

    The fi rst woman in her fam-ily to attend college, she was enthusiastic about entering the profession. She immediately began teaching at Horace Mann Elementary School in Newton.

    She had always known that she wanted to be a teacher. Since I was four, she said, my favor-ite game was to pretend I was a teacher.

    Her passion for teaching has remained throughout her many years as an educator, said neigh-bor and friend Barbara Mol, now an administrative assistant for the career and tech. ed. de-partment.

    In 1962, White took a break from teaching to focus on her family before returning in 1983. All of her four children came through the Newton schools, and she had been involved in the PTSO here before being asked to interview for the on campus position.

    Whites job as on campus coordinator means she brings in presenters and speakers and organizes in-house programs for the school. Its very important that students be aware of the world, she said, something her job allows her to take care of.

    Since White began, she has dramatically changed the on campus program.

    At fi rst, she said that it was diffi cult because there was no ex-ample. We had to tread carefully. She wanted to keep attendance voluntary, so students would be able to enjoy coming as opposed to feeling like they were forced to be there.

    She initially tried to show old Hollywood fi lms, but I gradually changed it to be something that was beyond the classroom or that could augment what happened in the classroom, she said.

    The faculty has been so im-pressive, wonderful and sup-portive, said a characteristically warm White. I thoroughly ap-preciated them being willing to take time to bring their classes to the programs, she said.

    Without teachers who were willing to do this, the program would not have flourished the way it has, White said.

    The PTSO was also very sup-portive and generous, she said, in funding some of the programs she brought in.

    Enriching student life this way, White has brought in everything from African cultural present-

    ers to the historian and anti-war activist Howard Zinn. It was very controversial, but quite im-portant, she said of the speaker brought in November 2001 for the fi rst of a series of four forums about 9/11.

    She wanted to give students a balance of views on what had happened so that they could un-derstand, and stirred up quite a controversy in the process.

    It was a wonderful opportu-nity for the classroom teachers to bring the discussion back to the class, where it belonged, she said.

    The programs she has brought in have refl ected and drawn on the community which is wonder-ful and so rich in resources and personalities, White said.

    I felt I was contributing to school culture in a positive way, she said.

    White has also worked with Theatre Ink, organizing perfor-mances of scenes from different school plays during the day, and following up with a discussion with the actors both in and out of character, seeing how their perspectives changed.

    She did this with plays such as The Laramie Project and Twi-light: Los Angeles 1992, which both offer social commentary.

    White was also very involved with the Human Rights Commit-tee with Dover.

    Dover said that White was one of the most involved members and was instrumental in creating the anti-racism and ethnic and cultural awareness programs. Weve done so much work with human rights, White said.

    Dover also nominated White for the City of Newtons Human Rights award, which she won in 1998.

    Out of the Human Rights Committee grew the PAWS peer mediation program, started by White in 1987.

    White said that this program, formed in an effort to improve student life, has been the most fulfi lling part of her job.

    PAWS is a neutral way to me-diate confl i