Robotic Exoskeletons: becoming economically feasible

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These slides use concepts from my (Jeff Funk) course entitled analyzing hi-tech opportunities to analyze rapid improvements in the economic feasibility of robotic exoskeletons. These exoskeletons can be worn by workers in harmful environments and physically disabled people. By sensing a person’s nerve impulses, these exoskeletons can activate motors that help people move and lift heavy objects. Improvements in biosensors, ICs, materials, batteries, and other components have enabled dramatic reductions in cost and weight, and improvements in response time

Transcript of Robotic Exoskeletons: becoming economically feasible

Opportunities in Hybrid Assistive Limb SUIT (MT5009)

Opportunities in Robotic Exoskeletons

Hybrid Assistive Limb SUIT (MT5009)

1

Group Members:

Phyoe Kyaw Kyaw A0098528M

Khin Sandar A0049731A

Mohammad Khalid A0098544R

Wang Juan A0098515W

Yuanbo Li (Michael) A0119085A

Zhongze Chen (Frank) A0119239B

CONTENTS

2

Introduction

How it Works

Applications

Evolution of Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL)

Developments of the HAL suits

Future improvements for the HAL suits

Robotics Market

Future Entrepreneurial Opportunities

Summary and Conclusion

INTRODUCTION

Prof. Yoshiyuki Sankai ( )

University of Tsukuba, Japan Founder of Cyberdyne

Systems Corporation

Founded in 24 June 2004 Headquarters in Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan R&D of equipment & systems in medical, rehabilitation,

elderly assistance, rescue support, heavy labor supports in factories and plants. Production, lease, sales and support of HAL.

Well known for Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL-5) suit

Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL) Suit

A cyborg-type robot that can supplement, expand or improve physical capability.

Source: Cyberdyne Corporation, www.cyberdyne.jp

HAL IN THE NEWS AND PUBLICATIONS

Hybrid Control System (Cybernic Autonomous Control + Bio-Cybernic Control)

Cybernic Autonomous Control System Two control algorithms to provide physical support to wearers in various conditions.

Bio-Cybernic Control System Control system that sense wearers motion and activities using bioelectrical signal including myoelectricity Wearer receives physical support directly from the bioelectrical signals driven motors

HOW IT WORKS: HYBRID CONTROL SYSTEM

HOW IT WORKS: BIO-CYBERNIC CONTROL

1. Brain sends Myoelectrical signal to muscles.

3. Biocybernic Control reads

data and activates the suits motors

2. Bioelectrical sensor detects the

signal and activates Biocybernic Control

Next generation rehabilitation

o Enhance and support physical capabilities of the user.

o Accelerate wearers daily activities and improve recovery.

o Support self-physical training

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APPLICATIONS

Disaster Relief activities

o Rescue support at disaster sites

o Accelerate disaster recovery activities

and save lives

o Lifting heavy obstacles, victims and

elderly

o Disaster cleanup

Heavy industries

o Support carrying heavy machines and parts

o Reduce injury due to improper handling of heavy items

o Help ease the workers and increase productivity

Hospitals and nursing homes

o Improves the mobility of elderly and

disabled

o Carry patients effortlessly by nurses

and hospital staffs

o Nurse-free walking and other physical

activities

APPLICATIONS

9

APPLICATIONS: DEMO

APPLICATIONS

Reference: The New England Journal of Medicine, Downloaded from nejm.org on August 25, 2013.

Statistical Analysis on HAL vs. other care for the recovery of stroke patients

For robot-assisted therapy: Testing on stroke patients shows that robot-assisted therapy is as good as intensive comparison therapy.

CONTENTS

11

Introduction

How it Works

Applications

Evolution of Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL)

Improvements of the HAL suits

Future improvements for the HAL suits

Robotics Market

Future Entrepreneurial Opportunities

Summary and Conclusion

EVOLUTION OF HAL SUITS

1996

Designs and Creation

- Prototype hardware

design, HAL-3

- Attached to computer

Scale and Weight

- Released HAL-3

Prototype for Trial

- Backpack battery

and weighted 22kg

1999 1993

Discovery

- Mapping out

neurons

governing leg

movement

1997

Design and Creation

- Prototype HAL-1

- Support only lower

half limb

Technology and Designs

- Prototype hardware

designs, HAL-5

- Attached computer

directly to the suit for

limb control system

2003

Scale and Weight

- Released HAL-5

Prototype for Trail

- Waist strapped

battery and

weighted 10kg

2005

Safety and Conformance

- certified for European

Conformity (EC

Certificate) in Medical

Device Directive (MDD)

Commercialization

- Commercialized

HAL-5 to hospitals

and rehab centers

- Operate in

Fukushima cleanup

2011 2012

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23 20 15

60

160

240

300

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30

60 70

1000

800

500

200

0

200

400

600

800

1000

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100

150

200

250

300

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HAL-3

(1999)

HAL-5

(2005)

HAL-5

(2008)

HAL-5

(2011)

Suit Weight (Kg)

Operating Time (mins)

Weight Lifting (kg)

Response Time (ms)

HAL IMPROVEMENTS MADE

IMPROVEMENTS: HAL-3 TO HAL-5A

HAL 5-A (2005)

HAL 3 (1999-2005)

Suit Type HAL-3 (1999-2005) HAL-5 Type A (2005) Improvement (%)

Weight (Lower Body)

22kg 15kg 32% weight reduction

Power Storage Lead-Acid

Rechargeable Battery Li-Poly Battery

Rechargeable battery

Operating time

< 60 mins < 160 mins 266% more

operating time

Motions Daily Activities (sitting down and standing up from a chair, walking, climbing up and down stairs)

Operation Cybernic

Autonomous Control (CAC)

Hybrid Control System (CAC + Bio-Cybernic

Control) 53% faster

response time Processing Microcontroller Microprocessor

Construction (S/W)

Tungsten / Aluminum

Nickel molybdenum and aluminum alloy

10% more Strength/Weight

Price University Research Clinical Trial First Clinical

Trail with HAL

Comparison of HAL-3 VS HAL-5 Type A

IMPROVEMENTS BIOELECTRICAL SENSING

Bio-Cybernic Control System

- HAL exoskeleton moves

according to the thoughts of its wearer.

- Muscle movements are based on nerve signals sent from the brain to the muscles signals that are registered in very weak traces on the surface of the skin.

- HAL identifies these signals using a sensor, sends a signal to the suits power unit and computer control the movement of the robotic limbs along with the human limbs

HAL 5-B (2008)

Suit Type HAL-5 Type A (2005 Ref)

HAL-5 Type B (2008)

HAL-5 Type C (2011)

Improvement (%)

Weight Lower body - 15kg

Full Body Weight (< 23kg)

Full Body Weight ( 5hrs

MEMS sensors /

Bay Trail Processors

Cybernic Autonomous Control (CAC) + Hybrid Control System (CAC +Bio-Cybernic Control)

Uppler/Lower Limb Suit Full-body Support Suit Tungsten Made Suit Heavy Industry Suit Polycarbonate Suit

SUMMARY - ROADMAP OF HAL

HAL suit The leader in robotics exoskeleton

Showed improvements and commitment to the success of the product.

Developments in key areas that will impact the performance and cost of the HAL suit.

Growing trend in robotics market.

Entrepreneurship opportunities

CONCLUSION

Lets have Q & A

[1] F. Ichihashi, Y. Sankai, S. Kuno, Development of Secure Data Management Server for e-

Health Promotion System, International Journal of Sport and Health Science,Vol.4, pp. 617-

627, 2006

[2] H. Toda, T. Kobayakawa, Y. Sankai, A multi-link system control strategy based biologilcal

movement, Advanced Robotics, vol.20 no.6, pp. 661-679, 2006

[3] H. Toda, Y. Sankai: Three-dimensional link dynamics simulator base on N-single-particle

movement, Advanced Robotics, vol. 19, no. 9, pp. 977-993, 2006

[4] H. Kawamoto, Y. Sankai: Power assist method based on phase sequence and muscle force

condition for HAL, Advanced Robotics, vol.19, no.7, pp. 717-734, 2005

[5] S. Lee, Y. Sankai: Virtual Impedance Adjustment in Unconstrained Motion for Exoskeletal

Robot Assisting Lower Limb, Advanced Robotics, vol.19, no.7, pp. 773-795, 2005

[6] K. Suzuki, G. Mito, H. Kawamoto, Y. Hasegawa and Y. Sankai: Intention-based walking

support for paraplegia patients with Robot Suit HAL, Advanced Robotics, vol. 21, no. 12, pp.

1441 1469, 2007

REFERENCES