Resolving Conflicts (2)

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    ResolvingResolving ConflictsConflicts::

    II Don'tDon't WantWant ToTo......

    ByBy JoseJose LuisLuis GacituaGacitua

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    ResolveResolve ConflictsConflicts BetweenBetweenParentsParents andand Their Their ChildrenChildren atatHomeHome..

    TopicTopic:

    45 Minutes45 MinutesDurationDuration ofofTheThe lessonlesson::

    HigherHigher EducationEducation,, VocationalVocationalEducationEducation,, AdultAdult//ContinuingContinuingEducationEducation..

    LevelLevel::

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    GoalsGoals ofof thethe lessonlesson

    ParentsParents willwill decidedecide howhow bestbest toto winwin thethe

    ""battlesbattles ofof parenthoodparenthood."."

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    Description:

    This lesson is intended for parents of school-agedchildren. Through brainstorming and discussion, parents

    share and discuss ways to resolve conflicts with their

    children.

    Objectives:

    Parents will learn how to resolve conflicts by examiningsituations and coming to a logical solution.

    Materials:

    - 6 poster boards.

    - Sticky notes (Post-It Notes) writing utensils.

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    Procedure:

    Prior to the lesson, place the following headings on six poster boards:

    "I Don't Want

    To"

    "Reasons For

    Your Actions"

    "Reasons For

    Your Child's

    Actions"

    "Things to Try" "SimilarSituations

    "Solutions"

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    The instructor may have parents work in small groups of 3-4 or individually with

    open forum discussion.

    Begin by asking, "Have you ever had a conflict situation with your child?" Have parentsshare their experiences. Ask parents to list all the facts about the "I Don't Want To"

    situations that they can think of on their sticky notes and place them under that topic

    heading on the poster board. Some examples might include, "I don't want to go to bed; I

    don't want to share; I don't want to take a bath."

    After describing the actions that occur in these situations, parents will brainstorm

    what the reasons for their actions are. Again, parents should write their ideas on sticky

    notes and place them under the appropriate heading. (Parents will continue in a similarmanner for the rest of the poster board topics. Allow 5-7 minutes for each poster board

    topic.) Next, parents brainstorm reasons that their child acts or feels the way that they do.

    Then they will discuss possible things that they could try differently next time. Parents will

    decide as a group what decision would be the best to use and why. They should parallel

    these situations with other conflict situations that arise with their children and place that

    under the "Similar Situations" heading. Then have parents think about their decision in

    these situations and look for other solutions, placing them under the appropriate heading.Parents should take into account all of their previous findings and come up with solutions

    that will be acceptable for the situations. Parents should try to come to a generalization

    about what solutions work, what solutions do not, and why.

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    AssessmentsAssessments

    ParentParent participationparticipation andand thethe completedcompleted

    posterposter boardsboards

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    Special CommentsSpecial Comments

    This is not only a great visual way toThis is not only a great visual way to

    show conflict resolutions but can also beshow conflict resolutions but can also be

    kept by the instructor as a tool to seekept by the instructor as a tool to seewhat their students are thinking. It is awhat their students are thinking. It is a

    great way to give the instructor an idea ofgreat way to give the instructor an idea of

    where their parenting troubles arewhere their parenting troubles are

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    Class Debate : Resolving Conflicts: I Don't Want To...

    Teacher Name: Mr. Gacitua

    Student Name: ________________________________________

    CATEGORY 4 3 2 1Use of

    Facts/Statistics

    Every major point was well

    supported with several

    relevant facts or examples.

    Every major point was

    adequately supported with

    relevant facts or examples.

    Every major point was

    supported with facts or

    examples, but the

    relevance of some was

    questionable.

    Every point was not

    supported.

    Organization All arguments were clearly tiedto an idea (premise) and

    organized in a tight, logical

    fashion.

    Most arguments wereclearly tied to an idea

    (premise) and organized in

    a tight, logical fashion.

    All arguments were clearlytied to an idea (premise)

    but the organization was

    sometimes not clear or

    logical.

    Arguments were notclearly tied to an idea

    (premise).

    Rebuttal All counter-arguments were

    accurate, relevant and strong.

    Most counter-arguments

    were accurate, relevant,

    and strong.

    Most counter-arguments

    were accurate and

    relevant, but several were

    weak.

    Counter-arguments were

    not accurate and/or

    relevant

    Understanding of

    Topic

    The team clearly understood

    the topic in-depth and

    presented their information

    forcefully and convincingly.

    The team clearly undestood

    the topic in-depth and

    presented their information

    with ease.

    The team seemed to

    understand the main

    points of the topic and

    presented those with

    ease.

    The team did not show an

    adequate understanding

    of the topic.

    Respect for Other

    Team

    All statements, body language,

    and responses were respectful

    and were in appropriate

    language.

    Statements and responses

    were respectful and used

    appropriate language, but

    once or twice bodylanguage was not.

    Most statements and

    responses were respectful

    and in appropriate

    language, but there wasone sarcastic remark.

    Statements, responses

    and/or body language

    were consistently not

    respectful.

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    Original lesson plan from:Original lesson plan from:

    http://www.eduref.org/cgihttp://www.eduref.org/cgi--

    bin/lessons.cgi/Health/Family_Lifebin/lessons.cgi/Health/Family_Life