Blended Learning:

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Blended Learning:. James Arvanitakis j.arvanitakis@uws.edu.au Twitter: jarvanitakis www.sociologic.me 0438454127 May 2013. WTF is blended learning?. From Wikipeadia. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Transcript of Blended Learning:

  • Blended Learning:

    James Arvanitakisj.arvanitakis@uws.edu.auTwitter: jarvanitakiswww.sociologic.me 0438454127May 2013

  • WTF is blended learning?

  • From WikipeadiaBlended learning is a formal education program in which a student learns at least in part through online delivery of content and instruction with some element of student control over time, place, path, and/or pace.

  • From WikipeadiaBlended learning is a formal education program in which a student learns at least in part through online delivery of content and instruction with some element of student control over time, place, path, and/or pace.

  • Good pedagogical practices using a variety of delivery mechanisms and allowing students flexibility

  • Good pedagogical practices using a variety of delivery mechanisms and allowing students flexibilityJames Arvanitakis

  • A CHANGING ENVIRONMENTWe are where newspapers were 10 years ago

  • A quick scanChanging nature of the student cohortUWS student for exampleRise of large classes - massificationAcross (most) institutionsStudents searching for relevanceRise of choiceBoth across institutions and within coursesBudgetary challengesWhat is being cut and by whom?

  • TEACH LIKE A PIRATE- EG GLOBALISATIONJames you teach like a pirate Pirates, like ninjas, change to suit their environments

  • Teach like a pirate: all teaching must be contextualised

  • Globalisation: A definitionGlobalisation may be thought of as the widening, deepening and speeding up of the worldwide interconnectedness in all aspects of contemporary social life, from the cultural to the criminal, the financial to the spiritual. (Held et al 1999, p. 2).

    This definition recognises globalisation is multi-dimensional, having width, breadth and depth.Another important aspect of this definition is that it portrays globalisation as a process. As globalisation permeates different areas of society

  • ContThe term globalisation reflects a perception that the world is increasingly being moulded into a shared social space The analogy: a butterfly flapping its wings in Tokyo effects the weather patterns in Sydney. That is, developments in one region of the world can have profound consequences on individuals or communities on the other side of the globe Importantly, this is in ways that are difficult to know and understand (linked with Chaos Theory)These effects can be cultural, economic or political as well as environmental.

  • Chaos TheoryWe draw on chaos theory because it is the study of nonlinear dynamics.That is, where seemingly random events are actually related and a pattern emergesThink of the butterfly effect again

  • Technology and GlobalisationWhat is the link between globalisation and technology?Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah.

  • Attention Span in Large ClassesAttention levels decrease after 10 20 minutes, when activity levels are passiveGibbs (1992); Bligh (2000)

  • Changing Demands on StudentsChanging the demands on students can have an impact on concentration levels and performance - Gibbs (1992); Bligh (2000)

  • Lets stop and thinkDoes the delivery mechanism change this?

  • Lectures: Idea v. Reality

    lectures are always exciting and effective for both the lecturer and the students

    What do you think?

  • GlobalisationWe are connected in many ways Sometimes these are straight forwardFor example: a direct trade treaty

  • Other times Chaos?We draw on chaos theory because it is the study of nonlinear dynamics.That is, where seemingly random events are actually related and a pattern emergesThink of the butterfly effect again

    How does this work?

  • What can we do about it?

  • Eg: Confronting racismHow would you explain to students that stereotypes are just that?

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FS2Ch83k3xo

  • Watch the following video from ABCs Media Watch about an incident that occurred in April 2010.

    http://www.abc.net.au/mediawatch/transcripts/s2870685.htm

    What insights does the video provide us with the way media aggravates racism?

  • What The Research Says ....

    This is important for teaching not just engaging studentsSimply reducing the number of students in a class will not alone improve the quality of teaching and learning.

    Key factors:

    opportunities to be engaged in a range of waystimely and frequent feedback to studentsactive problem-solvingfeeling like part of the group

  • Forgetting During Lectures

    Students forget information because of interference from subsequent material ....

    ..... and from preceding material

    .... Implications for teaching?

  • Forgetting After Lectures

    When students actively review what theyve learned in a lecture, close to the time of the lecture, they can retain up to 40% of the information for up to 60 days.

    Without prompt review of materials, retention is closer to 10%

    Bligh (2000)

  • Promoting active learning

    Active engagement, imaginative enquiry and the finding of a suitable level are all much more likely to occur if teaching methods that necessitate student activity, student problem-solving and question-asking, and cooperative learning are employedRamsden (1992 p. 167).

  • How do I translate this into practice?

  • Aligned Teaching

    The idea that students construct their own learning through relevant learning activities. Our job is to create a learning environment that supports the learning activities appropriate to achieving the desired learning outcomes. Key: all components in the teaching system (curriculum, intended outcomes, teaching methods, assessment tasks) are aligned. These are tuned to learning activities addressed in the desired learning outcomes. The student finds it difficult to escape without learning appropriately.

    Biggs, J.B. (2003). Teaching for quality learning at university. Buckingham: Open University Press/Society for Research into Higher Education. (Second edition)

  • CitizenshipSkills and knowledgeCulture

  • *Traditional Model of citizenshipCivic InstitutionsCitizensCitizensCitizensCitizensCitizens

  • *Changing Models of Citizenship: RelationalCivic InstitutionsCitizensCitizensCitizensCitizensCitizens

  • *Citizenship typologyDisempoweredEmpoweredEngagedDisengaged

  • THANK YOU!

  • Useful referencesBligh, D. A. (2000). Whats the use of lectures? San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

    Brookfield, S. D. (2006). The skilful teacher (2nd ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

    Cowan, J. (1998). On Becoming an Innovative University Teacher. Buckingham: The Society for Research into Higher Education and Open University Press.

    Gibbs, G. (1992). Improving the quality of student learning. Bristol, U.K.: Technical and Educational Services.

    Krause, K., Hartley, R., James, R., & McInnis, C. (2005). The first year experience in Australian universities: Findings from a decade of national studies. Centre for Studies in Higher Education (CHSE), University of Melbourne.

    Ramsden, P. (1992), Learning to Teach in Higher Education, Routledge, London.

    Scevack, J. J. (2010). Lectures (45 54). In In R. H. Cantwell, & J. J. Scevack, (eds.). An academic life. Victoria, Australia: Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER).

    Toohey, S. (1999). Designing courses for higher education. Buckingham: Society for Research into Higher Education/Open University Press.

    Slide 11 of 20: 1-2 minutes [Graph is hidden] What have you observed or what do you think happens with students and attention spans in large classes?

    Why?

    [Get a few responses from group]

    [Reveal graph]

    The main points to consider or be aware of are -

    Sustained and unchanging low level activity lowers concentration (Biggs & Tang, p. 109), e.g. just sitting there listening

    Attention levels (and learning) drops off sharply after 10 to 20 mins.

    *Slide 12 of 20: 1 minute or less

    By contrast, if we look at students attention spans (and learning) in large classes when lectures are structured differently and different demands are asked of them, we find that

    A short rest, or change in activity (approx every 15 mins) changes students attention to almost its original level BUT you will notice concentration levels do not come up as high as previously. They will continue to drop a little each 15 min block.

    So, lets consider the implications for giving lectures. Say you have to teach an important concept. When would you do it to ensure student attention was optimal?

    [Answer Early in the lecture or after a change in activity has occurred at the end of a 15 minute segment]

    [Optional notes]

    Shifting students to becoming active and engaged learners in lectures can be challenging, particularly when they hold strong views about what lecturers should do and what lectures should look like (e.g. issues in Brookfield reading) BUT its about setting up expectations at the beginning.

    If you change styles and expectations mid-way through a teaching semester without warning you will probably encounter a lot of resistance from students.*Slide 3 of 20: Less than 1 minute

    [Go over very briefly...

    Emphasise active learning in large classes in your context

    You will be able t