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Transcript of Blended Learning 101os-digital-learning-conference-16. · PDF file What is Blended Learning? A...

  • Blended Learning 101

    An introduction for secondary teachers

  • What is Blended Learning? » Definitions of blended learning

    range from so broad that practically any learning experience that integrates some use of educational technology might qualify

    » While others focus on a specific percentage combination of online curriculum and instruction in a face-to-face setting

  • What is Blended Learning? A good definition of blended learning from Innosight Institute defines blended learning as:

    A formal education program in which a student learns at least in part through online delivery of content and instruction with some element of student control over time, place, path, and/or pace and at least in part at a supervised brick-and- mortar location away from home.

  • Blended Learning Defined » Blended Learning is not Distance

    Learning or On-line learning

    » Distance Learning is any learning that allows instructor, students, and content to be located in different locations so that instruction and learning occur independent of time and place

  • Blended Learning Defined

    »Blended Learning combines two modes of instruction: > online and face-to-face.

    » In a Blended environment, students meet regularly with their teacher.

  • Why use Blended Learning? A talented California educator, Catlin Tucker, an expert on blended learning, wrote in her blog:

    “My interest in blended learning came from my own desire to improve student learning, while being a more effective educator. My teaching practice was transformed when I began weaving together work done in the classroom with work done online. As a result, I encourage regular teachers (like myself) to embrace this term and use technology to create a blended curriculum that combines engagement and active learning in the classroom with meaningful work done online.”

  • Rationale for Blended Learning 1) Few rigorous research studies of the effectiveness of

    online learning for K–12 students have been published. Much of the current work is based on older students.

    2) Students in online conditions performed modestly better, on average, than those learning the same material through traditional face-to-face instruction.

    3) Learning outcomes for students who engaged in online learning exceeded those of students receiving face-to- face instruction

    4) Instruction combining online and face-to-face elements had a larger advantage relative to purely face-to-face instruction than did purely online instruction.

    5) Students performed better in studies in which the online instruction was collaborative or instructor-directed than in those studies where online learners worked independently.

    Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development, Evaluation of Evidence- Based Practices in Online Learning: A Meta-Analysis and Review of Online Learning Studies, Washington, D.C., 2010.

  • Models of Blended Learning

    Classifying K–12 Blended Learning by Heather Staker and Michael B. Horn from Innosight Institute identifies four primary blended learning models.

  • Models of Blended Learning

    Let’s look at each of these, individually

  • Models of Blended Learning

    Rotation model – • A program in which students rotate on a fixed schedule or at the teacher’s discretion between learning modalities, at least one of which is online learning.

    • Other modalities might include activities such as small-group or full-class instruction, group projects, individual tutoring, and pencil-and-paper assignments.

  • Models of Blended Learning

    Rotation Model

    Station-Rotation Model

    Lab-Rotation Model

    Flipped-Classroom Model

    Individual-Rotation Model

  • Models of Blended Learning Station Rotation – • Students rotate on a fixed schedule or at

    the teacher’s discretion among classroom- based learning modalities.

    • The rotation includes at least one station for online learning.

    • Other stations might include activities such as – small-group or full-class instruction, – group projects, – individual tutoring, – and pencil-and-paper assignments.

    • Some implementations involve the entire class alternating among activities together,

    • Others divide the class into small group or one-by-one rotations.

  • Models of Blended Learning Lab Rotation – • Students rotate on a fixed

    schedule or at the teacher’s discretion among locations on the brick-and-mortar campus.

    • At least one of these spaces is a learning lab for predominantly online learning,

    • Additional classroom(s) house other learning modalities.

  • Models of Blended Learning Flipped Classroom – • Students rotate on a fixed schedule between face-

    to-face teacher-guided practice (or projects) on campus during the standard school day and online delivery of content and instruction of the same subject from a remote location (often home) after school.

    • The primary delivery of content and instruction is online, which differentiates a Flipped Classroom from students who are merely doing homework practice online at night.

    • The Flipped-Classroom model accords with the idea that blended learning includes some element of student control over time, place, path, and/or pace because the model allows students to choose the location where they receive content and instruction online and to control the pace at which they move through the online elements.

  • Models of Blended Learning

    Individual Rotation – • Students rotate on an individually

    customized, fixed schedule among learning modalities, at least one of which is online learning.

    • An algorithm or teacher(s) sets individual student schedules.

    • The Individual-Rotation model differs from the other Rotation models because students do not necessarily rotate to each available station or modality.

  • Models of Blended Learning

    Flex model – • A program in which content and instruction

    are delivered primarily by the Internet • Students move on an individually customized,

    fluid schedule among learning modalities, and the teacher-of-record is on-site.

    • The teacher-of-record or other adults provide face-to-face support on a flexible and adaptive as-needed basis through activities such as small-group instruction, group projects, and individual tutoring.

    • Some implementations have substantial face- to-face support, while others have minimal support.

  • Models of Blended Learning Self-Blend model – • A scenario in which students choose to take

    one or more courses entirely online to supplement their traditional courses and the teacher-of-record is the online teacher.

    • Students may take the online courses either on the brick-and-mortar campus or off-site.

    • This differs from full-time online learning and the Enriched-Virtual model because it is not a whole-school experience.

    • Students self-blend some individual online courses and take other courses at a brick- and-mortar campus with face-to-face teachers.

  • Models of Blended Learning Enriched-Virtual model – • Students divide their time between attending a

    brick-and-mortar campus and learning remotely using online delivery of content and instruction.

    • Many Enriched-Virtual programs began as full-time online schools and then developed blended programs to provide students with brick-and-mortar school experiences.

    • The Enriched-Virtual model differs from the Flipped Classroom because in Enriched-Virtual programs, students seldom attend the brick-and- mortar campus every weekday.

    • It differs from the Self-Blend model because it is a whole-school experience, not a course-by-course model.

  • Learning Management System

    • LMS – • The technology platform through

    which students’ access blended and online courses. A LMS generally includes software for creating and editing course content, communication tools, assessment tools, and other features for managing the course.

  • Learning Management Systems

  • Blended Learning Examples

  • Tips on Blending Your Class • START SMALL…Don’t try to blended an entire class or even every class you teach. Pick one project/activity and build from there.

    • COLLABORATE…Find like-minded teachers and share the load. Blending your classes takes a lot of up-front work. Having someone to help is always a good idea.

    • GET SOME ADVICE…Talk to peers who are already blending classes, read articles, take a class. Look for opportunities to learn more about Blended Learning.

    • Most importantly, DON’T GIVE UP… Things seldom go exactly as we plan. Anytime we try something new there are bound to be bumps in the road. Learn from them and try again.

  • Finding your Blend Useful strategies for designing online components for blended learning • Establish which learning activities or content

    do not require a face-to-face environment. These could include some of the following: – Administrative matters: Documents su