TRELA — spreads

TRELA — spreads
TRELA — spreads
TRELA — spreads
TRELA — spreads
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    creativevol. 1 / issue 1

    dec. 2011

    KATHERINE

    PROCTOR.Writer. Actress. Face-paintextraordinaire. The ar tistically-

    inclined sophomore talks about her

    venture into performance and why

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    ackland

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    student unioncenter fordramatic art

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    welcometo

    tarheelvill

    Welcome to Tarheelville, where the opportuni-ties for seeing and making art abound! Im yourtour guide, Katelyn. In the 729 acres that make upthe University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,there are buildings, nooks, hallways and classroomsdesignated for the art of art. Some are less wellknown like the galleries in Wilson and Davislibraries or the photo displays in Carroll Hall while others are beacons for artists of all kinds.Memorial Hall, the largest venue at UNC besides thebasketball arenas, hosts internationally renownedartists every year. On our tour, the student artistsbehind the best known places for paint, music andacting on campus will guide us on our tour!

    A universal space on campus, theStudent Union is home to lots of

    different art. Before renovations beganlast year, the basement held theCabaret, a performance place formany student performance groups. Inthe hallway between the auditoriumand the main Union lobby is thegallery, which displays changing visualand studio art by student artists.

    Swain Hall is the placefor communicationsstudies. There arestudios used for film-ing, recording andputting on small plays.Theres also a shop forcreating sets and adigital storytelling labfor editing.

    Hanes Art Center ishuge! The 45,000-square-foot buildinghouses everything atraditional artistneeds studios forprintmaking, painting,photography andelectronic media,

    plus a gallery andtwo libraries. Itsthe perfect place tovisit for inspirationor express yourself.

    Walking past Hill Hall is likewalking with a constant musicbox! Originally the CarnegieLibrary, Hill was transformed intoan auditorium for choirs and gleeclubs. Fit with a classic pipeorgan, it is always buzzing withmusic department concerts orrehearsing student groups.

    Historic Playmakers Theatre wecall it HPT also used to be alibrary. It wasnt a theater until

    The Center for Dramatic never empty. Home of twaters Kenan for smalleproductions and Paul Grethe PlayMakers RepertoryCompanys mainstage sho

    CDA also holds offices anrehearsal spaces. Since tMakers staff designs andits own sets, there are s

    ROB

    LARA

    MAYA

    KORI

    LEO

    1925, when theCarolina Playmakershad it renovated. Itnow houses plays bycampus groups likePauper Players andconcerts or spokenword events spon-sored by the Caro-lina Union ActivitiesBoard.

    creating and crafting.LAB! Theatre uses therehearsal rooms andKenan Theatre fortheir productions,which are all free,student-run andstudent-cast shows.

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    A

    LITTLEOFTHIS

    by

    katelyn

    trela

    Katherine Proctor. Writer. Actress. Face-paint ex-traordinaire.Te sophomore who is studying English,

    Communication, and CreativeWriting at UNC doesnthesitate to call hersel an artist.

    Witty-minded and admit-tedly gooy, Proctor proessesthat writing, though not al-ways included in the artistdescription, is one o the nestarts.

    Writing is denitely an ar t,she said. Its the creation or oundation o a lot o other

    arts. Writing is like cheese it exists in the world.Proctor, an assistant editor at Te Daily ar Heel, says

    she has always been a writer. She started, as most do,with short stories.

    Teyre quick and creative. You dont have to l aborover them or ages, which, when youre rst starting out,is incredibly daunting. You can really dive into a char-acter and quickly resolve whatevers going on in theirlive, she said.

    From short stories, she branched o writing one-act plays, eature-length screenplays, monologues andarticles.

    It wasnt until this all that she rst dipped her oot

    into perormance art.Im not a perormer. I didnt do plays in high school.

    I dont give speeches. Even when supremely intoxicat-ed, Im more likely to hide under a table than dance on

    one, she said.But when the Perormance Collective a student

    collaborative perorming unusual, uncanny, and ofenpolitically- or culturally-driven plays announcedthey would be adapting Jonathan Saran Foers novel,Eating Animals this all, Proctor jumped into the newpool.

    I came to (the Perormance Collective) throughsome classes in the communication studies department.Te wacky but layered work o the classes hooked me,and I joined the group so I could continue doing things

    like yodel expletives rom the Venable Hall balconies ina rainstorm.

    In the play, Proctor played a version o hersel, and aversion o Saran Foer. Her monologues included a pleaabout actory arming, kicking a stued dog whichshe eventually attempted to eat and running around

    a blood spattered stage.Te book is all about actory arming, but the play

    Biking it. Proctor stands with her bike, which sh

    around campus. She calls it the sexiest bike arou

    isnt a ull on guilt-t rip, most o the time.In the play, she also donned a mask

    paint with black lipstip and highlights. Thas quickly devone o her avori

    For Hallowecostume involvcoat o acepaintmake-upd look a beloved hobby.

    I elt really csome and erce w

    much so that I wwear it all the time. Which made me wo

    not quite socially acceptable or us to painthings on our aces on days o the year thaloween.

    Weve been missing a serious artisticoutlet here, and I give all o you permissake a lesson rom Lady Gaga and treat ycanvas or beautiul images or, requent

    ALITTLE

    OFTHAT

    I joined the group so Icould continue doing things

    like yodel expletives romthe Venable Hall balconies

    in a rainstorm.

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    disturbing and physically nauseating ones.Te ace is the nal rontier in ashion. Its a medium

    or art, its what people look at (generally) when theytalk to you, and its just waiting or us to do somethingwith it. Te least we can do is dress it up a little.

    Katherine Proctor. Writer. Actress. Face-paint ex-traordinaire.Te sophomore who is studying English, Communi-cation, and Creative Writing at UNC doesnt hesitateto call hersel an artist.

    Witty-minded and admittedly gooy, Proctor pro-esses that writing, though not always included in the

    artist description, is one o the nest arts.Writing is denitely an art, she said. Its the cre-

    ation or oundation o a lot o other arts. Writing is likecheese it exists in the world.

    Proctor, an assistant editor at Te Daily ar Heel, saysshe has always been a writer. She started, as most do,with short stories.

    Teyre quick and creative. You dont have to laborover them or ages, which, when youre rst starting out,is incredibly daunting. You can really dive into a char-acter and quickly resolve whatevers going on in theirlive, she said.

    From short stories, she branched o writing one-act plays, eature-length screenplays, monologues andarticles.

    It wasnt until this all that she rst dipped her ootinto perormance art.

    Im not a perormer. I didnt do plays in high school.I dont give speeches. Even when supremely intoxicat-

    ed, Im more likely to hide under a table than dance onone, she said.

    But when the Perormance Collective a studentcollaborative perorming unusual, uncanny, and ofenpolitically- or culturally-driven plays announcedthey would be adapting Jonathan Saran Foers novel,Eating Animals this all, Proctor jumped into the newpool.

    I came to (the Perormance Collective) throughsome classes in the communication studies department.Te wacky but layered work o the classes hooked me,

    and I joined the group so I could continue doing thingslike yodel expletives rom the Venable Hall balconies ina rainstorm.

    In the play, Proctor played a version o hersel, and aversion o Saran Foer. Her monologues included a pleaabout actory arming, kicking a stued dog which

    she eventually attempted to eat and running arounda blood spattered stage.

    Te book is all about actory arming, but the play

    isnt a ull on guilt-t rip, most o the time.In the play, she also donned a mask o white ace

    paint with black lipstip and highlights. Tis, she said,has quickly developed into one o her avorite pasttimes.

    or Halloween, Proctors costume involved a thickcoat o acepaint, making the make-upd look evenmore o a beloved hobby.

    I elt really cool and awesome and erce wearingit, so much so t