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    il^^h

    Stories

    by

    GAUTIER

    MOKT*

    -J

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    THE

    LIBRARY

    OF

    THE UNIVERSITY

    OF

    CALIFORNIA

    LOS

    ANGELES

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    ^be

    MorlD's

    Stors

    idlers

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    The

    translations

    by

    Lefcadio

    Hearn

    of

    Gautier's

    Stories

    are

    Copyright

    in

    the

    United

    States

    of America,

    and

    this

    Edition

    has

    been

    printed

    by

    permission

    of

    Messrs.

    Brentano, New

    York.

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    STORIES

    BY

    THEOPHILE

    GAUTIER

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    THE

    WORLD'S

    STORY

    TELLERS

    EDITED

    BY

    ARTHUR

    RANSOME

    STORIES

    BY

    THEOPHILE

    GAUTIER

    TRANSLATED

    BY

    LAFCADIO

    HEARN

    NEW

    YORK:

    E.

    P.

    BUTTON

    AND

    COMPANY

    1908

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    CONTENTS

    PAGE

    INTRODUCTORY

    ESSAY

    xi

    CLARIMONDE

    I

    THE

    mummy's

    FOOT

    $2

    KING

    CANDAULES

    71

    vU

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    SUMMARISED

    CHRONOLOGY

    TMophile

    Gautier

    zvas

    born

    at Tarbes ojt

    August

    20,

    181

    1,

    and

    taken to

    Paris

    in

    1814.

    He

    was sent

    to

    school

    when

    he

    was

    eight,

    but,

    being

    unable

    to bear

    his

    isolation,

    was

    taken

    away

    and

    sent

    as

    a

    day-boy

    to

    the

    Lyc^e

    Charlemagne,

    though

    he

    learned

    mostly

    from

    his

    father.

    He was

    introduced

    as

    a

    youth

    to Victor

    Hugo,

    and took

    a

    prominent

    part

    in

    the

    theatre

    battle

    between

    Classicists

    and

    Romanticists

    on the

    presentaii07i

    of

    Hernani,

    February

    25,

    1830.

    His

    first

    book,

    of

    poetry,

    was

    published

    in

    the

    same

    year,

    his second

    in

    1832,

    and

    Les

    Jeunes

    France,

    a

    book

    of

    spirited

    tales,

    in

    1833.

    Then,

    being

    asked

    for

    a

    sensational

    romance,

    he

    wrote

    Mademoiselle

    de

    Maupin,

    almost

    under

    compulsion.

    His

    father

    used

    to lock

    him

    up

    and tell him

    he

    should

    not

    be

    let out

    till

    he

    had

    written

    ten

    pages.

    The

    book

    was

    p7iblished

    in

    1836.

    Fro?n

    this

    time

    till

    his death

    he

    wrote

    continually

    for

    the

    papers,

    and

    published

    books

    almost

    every

    year, of

    which

    the

    most

    important

    are

    Emaux et

    Camees,

    Romans

    et

    Contes,

    Le

    Capitaine

    Fracasse,

    Nouvelles,

    and

    Le

    Roman

    de la

    Momie,

    and a

    series

    of

    volumes

    of

    travels.

    He

    died

    on

    June

    23,

    1872.

    His

    Histoire

    du Romantisme

    was

    published

    after

    his

    death,

    as

    well

    as several

    volumes

    made

    up of

    articles

    he had

    contributed

    to

    newspapers

    and

    reviews.

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    INTRODUCTORY

    ESSAY

    The

    East

    is

    an

    invention

    of

    the

    nineteenth

    century.

    We

    have

    only

    to

    look

    at

    the

    works

    of

    Voltaire

    or of

    Goldsmith

    to

    see

    that

    the

    Orient

    did

    not

    exist

    before

    the

    time of

    the

    Romantic

    movement.

    To

    early

    writers

    it meant

    nothing

    but

    polygamy,

    moguls,

    elephants,

    and

    'bonzes,'

    and

    the

    eighteenth-century

    translation

    of

    the Arabian

    Nights

    did

    little

    more

    than

    supply

    an

    entertaining

    form

    to

    an

    ironical

    philosopher.

    Even

    when

    it

    became

    the

    fashion

    to

    make

    imaginary

    Orientals

    expose

    the

    follies

    of

    the

    West,

    the

    East

    had

    not

    yet

    become

    alive

    for

    us.

    We

    find

    scarcely

    a hint

    in

    the

    hundred

    and

    twenty

    letters

    of

    The Citizen

    of

    the

    World

    that

    it

    meant

    more

    than

    a dialectical

    expression

    for

    topsy-turvydom,

    a

    place

    to

    which you

    could

    refer

    as

    to

    Lilliput

    or

    to

    Brobdingnag,

    useful

    like

    the

    X of

    algebra

    in

    illustrating

    the

    properties

    of

    other

    things.

    The

    first

    glimmerings

    of

    discovery

    are

    in

    Beckford's

    Vathek,

    an

    extravagant

    book,

    belittled

    by

    a

    schoolboyish

    humour—

    as

    when

    the

    Caliph

    plays

    football

    with

    the

    rotund

    figure

    of

    the

    Indian

    Magician

    but

    written

    by

    a

    man

    to

    whom

    the

    East

    did

    really

    mean

    some

    sort

    of

    gorgeous

    dream.

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    XIV

    INTRODUCTORY

    ESSAY

    For the East is not

    an

    expression

    of

    philosophy.

    or

    of

    geography,

    but

    of

    temperament

    ;

    it is

    a

    dream

    that

    has

    led

    many

    to

    leave

    their

    people

    for

    its

    people,

    their homes

    for

    desert

    tents,

    in the

    effort

    to

    turn

    its

    conventions

    into

    realities

    of

    life.

    Men

    have

    fallen

    in

    love

    with

    it,

    as

    they

    have

    fallen

    in

    love

    with statues

    or with

    the

    beautiful women of

    pictures.

    It means

    more

    than

    itself,

    like

    a

    man

    whom

    time

    has lifted into

    Godhead.

    It

    has

    been

    given

    the

    compelling

    power

    of

    a

    religion.

    I

    believe it was an invention

    made

    possible

    by

    the

    discovery

    of

    local

    colour.

    With

    the

    emphasis

    of

    local