Mac Integration Basics 10.7

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Adding a Mac to a Windows or other Standards-based Network This guide is for individuals bringing a Mac computer into a small business environment that is predominantly Windows-based. Windows Small Business Server is most likely the server being used. The guide is also for users replacing a Windows computer with a Mac, and for system administrators supporting the above users. In this guide you’ll learn all the ways you can integrate a Mac within your organization’s network environment, including how to configure your Mac to work with Active Directory, and how to take advantage of network services, file sharing, printing, instant messaging, emailing, calendars and contacts. You’ll also learn about security at the user, local network, and remote networking levels. You’ll learn about data management, both migrating your data from a Windows computer as well as backing up your important data. Finally you’ll learn how to run Windows programs directly on your Mac, giving you total compatibility and interoperability with colleagues using Windows.

Transcript of Mac Integration Basics 10.7

  • 1.Mac Integration Basics 10.7 Adding a Mac to a Windows or other Standards-based Network

2. COPYRIGHT Apple Inc. 2011 Apple Inc. All rights reserved. Apple, the Apple logo, iCal, iPhone, iPhoto, iPod, iTunes, Keynote, Mac, Macintosh, Mac OS, Numbers, Pages, Safari, and Spotlight are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Adobe and PostScript are trademarks or registered trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the U.S. and/or other countries. Bluetooth is a registered trademark owned by Bluetooth SIG, Inc. UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group in the U.S. and other countries. Other company and product names mentioned herein are trademarks of their respective companies. Mention of third-party products is for informational purposes only and constitutes neither an endorsement nor a recommendation. Apple assumes no responsibility with regard to the performance or use of these products. Mention of third-party products is for informational purposes only and constitutes neither an endorsement nor a recommendation. Apple assumes no responsibility with regard to the performance or use of these products. All understandings, agreements, or warranties, if any, take place directly between the vendors and the prospective users. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information in this manual is accurate. Apple is not responsible for printing or clerical errors. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information in this manual is accurate. Apple is not responsible for printing or clerical errors. Because Apple periodically releases new versions and updates to its software, images shown in this book may be different from what you see on your screen. 08-26-2011 3. Contents Introduction 5 Overview 5 Prerequisite Knowledge 5 Network Accounts 6 Configuring a Mac to Connect to a Network Account Server 6 Using Network Accounts 11 Summary 12 For Additional Information 12 File Sharing 13 Connecting to File Servers 13 Personal File Sharing 15 Summary 17 For Additional Information 17 Email, Calendars, and Contacts 18 Email 18 Connecting to an Exchange Server Email with POP and IMAP Servers Contacts 21 Calendars 23 Summary 26 For Additional Information 26 Security 27 User Account Security 27 Choosing a Password Locking the Computer Screen Disabling Automatic Login System Security 30 FileVault 2 Firmware Password Antivirus Protection Network Security 35 OSX Firewall 4. Virtual Private Network Summary 40 For Additional Information 40 Printing from OSX Computers 41 Connecting to a USB Printer 41 Printing to a Network Printer 42 Working with PPD files 43 Summary 44 For Additional Information 44 Instant Messaging 45 Configuring iChat 46 me.com, Mac.com, and AIM Accounts Other Instant Messaging Services Summary 51 Data Management and Backup 52 Migrating Data from Windows to a Mac 52 Transfer your Information from a PC with Migration Assistant Copying Files to External Storage Migrating Files Via Email Backing Up Data 54 Backing Up Data with Time Machine Alternate Backup Methods Summary 57 Cross-platform Compatibility 58 Cross-platform Compatibility 59 Cross-platform Applications Cross-platform File Types Running Windows on a Mac 59 Boot Camp Virtualization Summary 65 For Additional Information 65 Additional Resources 66 Mac Integration Basics Exam 66 OSX Training & Certification 66 OSX Courses OSX Certifications Books 67 Support 67 5. Introduction Overview This guide is for individuals bringing a Mac computer into a small business environment that is predominantly Windows-based. Windows Small Business Server is most likely the server being used. The guide is also for users replacing a Windows computer with a Mac, and for system administrators supporting the above users. In this guide youll learn all the ways you can integrate a Mac within your organizations network environment, including how to configure your Mac to work with Active Directory, and how to take advantage of network services, file sharing, printing, instant messaging, emailing, calendars and contacts. Youll also learn about security at the user, local network, and remote networking levels. Youll learn about data management, both migrating your data from a Windows computer as well as backing up your important data. Finally youll learn how to run Windows programs directly on your Mac, giving you total compatibility and interoperability with colleagues using Windows. Prerequisite Knowledge This material assumes you have a basic understanding of OSX skills and terminology. If youre new to the Mac, you should review one of two online Apple Support resources that provide an introduction to using the Mac: Switch 101Designed for a PC user who has just switched to the Mac and wants to find out how to adapt old working habits to the Mac. Switch 101 is located online at http://www.apple.com/support/switch101/. Mac 101Written for people who are new to computers or simply need a refresher course on how to get the most out of a Mac. Mac 101 is located online at http:// www.apple.com/support/mac101/. 5 1 6. Network Accounts Microsoft Small Business Server and Windows Server use Active Directory to provide accounts, authentication and shared services for network users. Open Directory is another directory server implementation that enables the use of LDAP directory services. Whatever directory service protocol your organization uses, Mac users can effortlessly join existing networks and adhere to enterprise policies for strong authentication and password-protected access to network resources. Adding a Mac to a network with directory services is a simple process thanks to the network account support built into OSXLion. Configuring a Mac to Connect to a Network Account Server To allow your Mac to use a network account, you must first configure it to connect to a directory server. This configuration process is known as binding. Binding is accomplished in the Users & Groups pane of System Preferences. Youll need to authenticate as an administrator user to initiate the process. In the next steps youll learn how to bind to an Active Directory server and an Open Directory/LDAP server. Bind to an Active Directory server: Before you bind a Mac to an Active Directory server, youll need the following pieces of information from the server administrator: The address of the Active Directory Domain. An administrator user name. An administrator password. Note:Your server administrator may also specify the ID your computer should use. 6 2 7. 1. Choose Apple menu > System Preferences. 2. Click Users & Groups. 3. Click Login Options. 4. If the lock icon is locked, unlock it by clicking it and entering the name and password of an administrator account. 7 8. 5. Click the Join button. If youve previously joined a directory server, click the Edit button instead of the Join button. In the dialog that appears, click the Add (+) button beneath the list of previously joined servers. 6. Enter the Active Directory address provided by your server administrator. The dialog window will expand to display the Active Directory Settings fields. 7. Enter the Active Directory user name and password provided by your server administrator. 8 9. 8. Optionally edit the ID you want Active Directory to use for your server. The Client Computer ID is preset to the name of the computer. (This is the same name the Mac uses in the Sharing preferences.) You can change this to conform to your organizations established scheme for naming computers in the Active Directory domain. If youre not sure, consult the server administrator. 9. Click OK. This creates a record for your Mac in the Active Directory domain. Bind to an Open Directory/LDAP server: When adding an Open Directory server, youll need the following pieces of information from the server administrator: the server name or IP address. whether the server requires the secure sockets layer (SSL) protocol. 1. Open System Preferences by either clicking the System Preferences icon in the Dock, or choosing System Preferences from the Apple menu. 2. Click Users & Groups. 9 10. 3. Click Login Options. 4. If the lock icon is locked, unlock it by clicking it and entering the name and password of an administrator account. 5. Click the Join button. If youve previously joined a directory server, click the Edit button instead of the Join button. In the dialog that appears, click the Add (+) button beneath the list of previously joined servers. 6. You can choose a server from the pop-up menu or manually enter the servers domain name (or IP address). 10 11. 7. Click OK. OSX will connect to the directory server. Youll be notified if the directory server doesnt provide a secure connection via SSL and given the option to continue or cancel the connection to the server. 8. Click Done to return to the Users & Groups pane. Youve bound your Mac to an LDAP server. Using Network Accounts Now that youve configured your Mac to connect to a directory server, you can log into it using your network user account. Before you can log in, youll need to get a network account user name and password from the server administrator. For Active Directory accounts, the user name can be in one of three formats: shortname [email protected] DOMAINshortname Log in using a network account: 1. If youre currently logged in on your Mac, log out by choosing Log Out from the Apple menu. OSX will log out and a login window will list all the local user accounts, followed by Other. 2. Click Other and enter the network account user name and password provided by your server administrator. 3. Press Return or click the Log In (the right arrow) button. Youre now logged into your Mac using the account provided by the directory server. Your Mac system is fully integrated into the network. 11 12. Summary In this chapter youve learned the steps for setting up a Mac to connect to a directory server. Based on what youve learned, y