CMS, LMS & LCMS the systems supporting elearning Michael M. Grant 2010

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Transcript of CMS, LMS & LCMS the systems supporting elearning Michael M. Grant 2010

  • Slide 1
  • CMS, LMS & LCMS the systems supporting elearning Michael M. Grant 2010
  • Slide 2
  • is different from content management system course management system
  • Slide 3
  • Management Systems Course
  • Slide 4
  • Features of CMSs
  • Slide 5
  • CMSs in use. From http://www.wordle.net/show/wrdl/1674941/CMSs_in_Use_at_Universities
  • Slide 6
  • CMSs known. From http://www.wordle.net/show/wrdl/1674983/CMSs_Known_to_Faculty
  • Slide 7
  • Issues with CMSs
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  • Management Systems Content
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  • Defined content management system
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  • Functions of CMSs
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  • CMS Content Creators IT Professionals & Web Developers IT Professionals & Web Developers Adapted from http://www.patrickpetersen.nl/images/cmspatrickpetersen.jpg Workflow content management
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  • Examples Luminis
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  • versus learning content management system learning managem ent system
  • Slide 14
  • Defined LMS & LCMS
  • Slide 15
  • An LMS An LMS is a system designed to automate the administration of training events. LMS functionality includes user registration, tracking courses in a catalog, and recording data from learners; it also has reporting features for analysis purposes. An LMS is typically designed to handle courses by multiple publishers and providers. It usually doesnt include its own authoring capabilities; instead, it focuses on managing courses created by a variety of other sources. An LMS is a system designed to automate the administration of training events. LMS functionality includes user registration, tracking courses in a catalog, and recording data from learners; it also has reporting features for analysis purposes. An LMS is typically designed to handle courses by multiple publishers and providers. It usually doesnt include its own authoring capabilities; instead, it focuses on managing courses created by a variety of other sources. Adapted from http://www.nettskolen.com/forskning/Definition%20of%20Terms.pdf, http://www.astd.org/LC/glossary.htm & http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/ict/services/teachingandresearchservices/elearning/aboutelearning/elearningglossary
  • Slide 16
  • An LCMS An LCMS is a system used primarily for development, maintenance, tagging, and storage of instructional content. During development, it is used to import and store assets that will be used to create a learning object; and create and store content objects. The LCMS may have workflow process functionality and the ability to tag assets and content objects with metadata. If set up to work with dynamic delivery, an LCMS will assemble the proper assets on-the-fly to create a learning object. While many LCMS can deliver content, they usually do not have the administrative functionality of an LMS. Many LCMS can export content in a variety of different formats. Adapted from Deborah Adams (2010, personal communication), http://www.nettskolen.com/forskning/Definition%20of%20Terms.pdf, http://www.informetica.com/article/lms-vs-lcms-vs-the-informetica-lcms-117.asp, http://www.astd.org/LC/glossary.htm & http://www.checkpoint- elearning.com/article/4465.html
  • Slide 17
  • LMS/LCMSs in use. From http://www.wordle.net/show/wrdl/1674870/LMSs_in_Use
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  • LMS/LCMSs known. From http://www.wordle.net/show/wrdl/1674896/LMSs_Known_to_eLearning_Professionals
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  • difference? Whats the See Brandon Hall Research See Brandon Hall Research at http://www.brandon- hall.com/free_resources/lms_and_lcms.shtml See Brandon Hall Research See Brandon Hall Research at http://www.brandon- hall.com/free_resources/lms_and_lcms.shtml
  • Slide 20
  • Issues to consider
  • Slide 21
  • References Brandon Hall Research. (n.d.). LMS and LCMS demystified. Brandon-hall.com. Retrieved from http://www.brandon- hall.com/free_resources/lms_and_lcms.shtml Dabbagh, N. & Bannan-Ritland, B. (2005). Online learning: Concepts, strategies, and applications. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall. Helion-Prime Solutions Ltd. (2008). Cutting edge content management. PRlog.org. Retrieved from http://www.prlog.org/10056268-cutting-edge-content- management.html Mott, J. & Wiley, D. (2009). Open for learning: The CMS and the open learning network. Education, 15(2). Retrieved from http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/2121 Wang, H., & Gearhart, D.L. (2006). Designing and developing web-based instruction. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall. Special thanks to Deborah Adams, Matt McClean, Chuck Hodges, Nancy Leininger, Bill Brescia, Elizabeth Boling, Ward Cates, MJ Bishop, David Wiley, Kevin Thorn, Kevin Oliver, Yuri Quintana, Robin Navel, Joan Davis, David Lindenberg, Mindy Fisher, Corey Johnson, Dennis Charksy, Michael Barbour, and Tom Hergert for contributing to this presentation. & Acknowledgements
  • Slide 22
  • Michael M. Grant 2010