Unit 8B: Motivation and Emotion: Emotions, Stress and Health

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Unit 8B: Motivation and Emotion: Emotions, Stress and Health. Lab #12: Motivation. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Transcript of Unit 8B: Motivation and Emotion: Emotions, Stress and Health

  • Unit 8B:Motivation and Emotion: Emotions, Stress and Health

  • Lab #12: MotivationThe initial expectation for the blue group was much lower than ours. After their initial expectation, their expectation skyrocketed to mirror something similar to our groups expectations. I think this is because the blue group was told a lower average score from the pink groups. If this is true, it would suggest that people tend to think of themselves as average at something they have never tried before, however, after trying it, they base their expectation on experience.

  • Theories of emotions

    EmotionPhysiological arousalExpressive behaviorConscious experience

  • Theories of emotions

    James-Lange theory

  • Theories of emotions

    James-Lange theory

  • Theories of emotions

    James-Lange theory

  • Theories of emotions

    Cannon-Bard theory

  • Theories of emotions

    Cannon-Bard theory

  • Theories of emotions

    Two-factor theorySchachter-Singer

  • Theories of emotions

    Two-factor theorySchachter-Singer

  • Theories of emotions

    Two-factor theorySchachter-Singer

  • Theories of emotions

  • Embodied Emotion

  • Emotions and the Autonomic Nervous SystemAutonomic nervous systemSympathetic nervous systemarousingParasympathetic nervous systemCalmingModerate arousal is ideal

  • Emotions and the Autonomic Nervous System

  • Emotions and the Autonomic Nervous System

  • Physiological Similarities Among Specific EmotionsDifferent movie experiment

  • Physiological Differences Among Specific EmotionsFearMore activity in amygdalaLess activity in thalamus

    Prefrontal CortexRight= DisgustLeft = Joy

    Nucleus Accumbenspleasure

  • Cognition and EmotionCognition Can Define EmotionSchachter-Singer experimentSpill-Over EffectArousal fuels emotions, cognition channels itDoesnt Always

  • Expressed Emotion

  • Detecting Emotion

    Nonverbal cuesDuchenne smile

  • Gender, Emotion, and Nonverbal Behavior

  • Gender, Emotion, and Nonverbal Behavior

  • Culture and Emotional Expression

  • Levels of Analysis for the Study of Emotion

  • Levels of Analysis for the Study of Emotion

  • Levels of Analysis for the Study of Emotion

  • Levels of Analysis for the Study of Emotion

  • The Effects of Facial Expressions

    Facial feedback

  • Experienced Emotion

  • Fear

    Adaptive value of fearThe biology of fearamygdala

  • Anger

    AngerEvoked by eventsCatharsisExpressing anger can increase anger

  • Happiness

    HappinessFeel-good, do-good phenomenonWell-being

  • HappinessThe Short Life of Emotional Ups and DownsWatsons studies

  • HappinessWealth and Well-Being

  • HappinessWealth and Well-Being

  • HappinessTwo Psychological Phenomena: Adaptation and ComparisonHappiness and Prior ExperienceAdaptation-level phenomenonHappiness and others attainmentsRelative deprivation

  • HappinessPredictors of Happiness

  • Stress and Health

  • Introduction

    Health psychologyBehavioral medicine

  • Stress and Illness

    StressStress appraisal

  • Stress and IllnessThe Stress Response SystemSelyes general adaptation syndrome (GAS)AlarmResistanceexhaustion

  • Stress and Illness General Adaptation Syndrome

  • Stress and Illness General Adaptation Syndrome

  • Stress and Illness General Adaptation Syndrome

  • Stress and Illness General Adaptation Syndrome

  • Stress and IllnessStressful Life EventsCatastrophesSignificant life changesDaily hassles

  • Stress and the Heart

    Coronary heart diseaseType A versus Type BType AType B

  • Stress and Susceptibility to Disease

    Psychophysiological illnessesPsychoneuroimmunology (PNI)LymphocytesB lymphocytesT lymphocytesStress and AIDSStress and Cancer

  • The End

  • Teacher InformationTypes of FilesThis presentation has been saved as a basic Powerpoint file. While this file format placed a few limitations on the presentation, it insured the file would be compatible with the many versions of Powerpoint teachers use. To add functionality to the presentation, teachers may want to save the file for their specific version of Powerpoint.AnimationOnce again, to insure compatibility with all versions of Powerpoint, none of the slides are animated. To increase student interest, it is suggested teachers animate the slides wherever possible.Adding slides to this presentationTeachers are encouraged to adapt this presentation to their personal teaching style. To help keep a sense of continuity, blank slides which can be copied and pasted to a specific location in the presentation follow this Teacher Information section.

  • Teacher InformationHyperlink Slides - This presentation contain two types of hyperlinks. Hyperlinks can be identified by the text being underlined and a different color (usually purple).Unit subsections hyperlinks: Immediately after the unit title slide, a page (slide #3) can be found listing all of the units subsections. While in slide show mode, clicking on any of these hyperlinks will take the user directly to the beginning of that subsection. This allows teachers quick access to each subsection.Bold print term hyperlinks: Every bold print term from the unit is included in this presentation as a hyperlink. While in slide show mode, clicking on any of the hyperlinks will take the user to a slide containing the formal definition of the term. Clicking on the arrow in the bottom left corner of the definition slide will take the user back to the original point in the presentation. These hyperlinks were included for teachers who want students to see or copy down the exact definition as stated in the text. Most teachers prefer the definitions not be included to prevent students from only copying down what is on the screen and not actively listening to the presentation.For teachers who continually use the Bold Print Term Hyperlinks option, please contact the author using the email address on the next slide to learn a technique to expedite the returning to the original point in the presentation.

  • Teacher InformationContinuity slidesThroughout this presentation there are slides, usually of graphics or tables, that build on one another. These are included for three purposes. By presenting information in small chunks, students will find it easier to process and remember the concepts. By continually changing slides, students will stay interested in the presentation.To facilitate class discussion and critical thinking. Students should be encouraged to think about what might come next in the series of slides. Please feel free to contact me at kkorek@germantown.k12.wi.us with any questions, concerns, suggestions, etc. regarding these presentations. Kent KorekGermantown High SchoolGermantown, WI 53022262-253-3400kkorek@germantown.k12.wi.us

  • Division title (green print)subdivision title (blue print)xxxxxxxxx

  • Division title (green print)subdivision title (blue print)Use this slide to add a table, chart, clip art, picture, diagram, or video clip. Delete this box when finished

  • Definition Slide= add definition here

  • Definition Slides

  • Emotion= a response of the whole organism, involving (1) physiological arousal, (2) expressive behaviors, and (3) conscious experience.

  • James-Lange Theory= the theory that our experience of emotion is our awareness of our physiological responses to emotion-arousing stimuli.

  • Cannon-Bard Theory= the theory that an emotion-arousing stimulus simultaneously triggers (1) physiological responses and (2) the subjective experience of emotion.

  • Two-factor Theory= the Schachter-Singer theory that to experience emotion one must (1) be physically aroused and (2) cognitively label the arousal.

  • Polygraph= a machine, commonly used in attempts to detect lies, that measure several of the physiological responses accompanying emotion (such as perspiration and cardiovascular and breathing changes).

  • Facial Feedback= the effect of facial expressions on experienced emotions, as when a facial expression of anger or happiness intensifies feelings of anger or happiness.

  • Catharsis= emotional release. The catharsis hypothesis maintains that releasing aggressive energy (through action or fantasy) relieves aggressive urges.

  • Feel-Good Do-Good Phenomenon= peoples tendency to be helpful when already in a good mood.

  • Well-being= self-perceived happiness or satisfaction with life. Used along with measures of objective well-being (for example, physical and economic indicators) to evaluate peoples quality of life.

  • Adaptation-level Phenomenon= our tendency to form judgments (of sounds, of lights, of income) relative to a neutral level defined by our prior experience.

  • Relative Deprivation= the perception that we are worse off relative to those with whom we compare ourselves.

  • Behavioral Medicine= an interdisciplinary field that integrates behavior and medical knowledge and applies that knowledge to health and disease..

  • Health Psychology= a subfield of psychology that provides psychology's contribution to behavioral medicine.

  • Stress= the process by which we perceive and respond to certain events, called stressors, that we appraise as threatening o