Summer 2015 - Southern Oregon Wine Scene

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Southern Oregon Wine Scene magazine showcases the wineries, tours, restaurants, lodging and more in Southern Oregon Wine Country!

Transcript of Summer 2015 - Southern Oregon Wine Scene

  • 1SOUTHERN OREGON WINE SCENE / SUMMER 2015

    SOUTHERN OREGON

    LIVING BETWEEN THE VINESSummer 2015WINE SCENE

  • SOUTHERN OREGON WINE SCENE / SUMMER 20152

    PerformancesArtistsfrom

    Vineyardsfrom StagestoArtisansto

    pull back the curtain Great

    Dailyon

    TravelMedford.org/wine

  • 3SOUTHERN OREGON WINE SCENE / SUMMER 2015

    Im so pleased to present this premier issue of Southern Oregon Wine Scene magazine! In each issue, well take you on a journey of discovery through the Southern Oregon wine region, meeting those who put everything on the line to bring us their wines!

    Whether youre a visitor or a local, youll be impressed by the friendly, down-to-earth people living and working in the Wine Scene! From grape growers, vineyard & tasting room managers, wine makers, winery owners and others, I encourage you to get out there and personally meet Southern Oregons friendly winery folks!

    From humble garagiste to chateau-type wineries and everything in-betweenfrom the Umpqua Valley to Ashland and Cave Junction to Butte Falls, theres something for everyone to discover in the Southern Oregon Wine Scene.

    If youve ever considered taking a wine tour, catch Paula Bandys feature on the recent growth of professional wine tour companies and learn more about the benefits of working with a professional guide.

    With the topic of climate change in the news, have you ever wondered how climate impacts growing grapes and making wine? In MJ Daspits piece, One Cool Conversation, she and Southern Oregon University Professor Greg Jones delve into the topic, examining his pioneering work in the field of climate science, impacting how we think about weather and wine.

    Theres so much fine local wine being made heredoesnt it make sense to pair your favorite labels with the best,

    locally-sourced foods? In Sarah Lemons feature, learn about several farmers and vintners making a difference in the Southern Oregon food and wine scene.

    And, in Part I of Think Global, Wine Local, discover how European training and methodology influenced several leading Umpqua Valley winemakers and its impact on their acclaimed brands.

    With our winery guides, easy-to-navigate maps, interesting features and more, Wine Scene has it all, from Albario to Zinfandeleverything to make your Southern Oregon wine experience an adventure to remember.

    Cheers to Reading Between the Vines in the Southern Oregon Wine Scene!

    4 / ONE COOL CONVERSATION

    24 / PAIRINGS DIRECTORY

    25 / WINE TERMS GLOSSARY

    8 / THINK GLOBAL, WINE LOCAL

    11 / OREGON WINE EXPERIENCE

    6 / EXPLORE WINE COUNTRY 10 / FARMERS MARKETS & WINEWorld-renowned SOU research climatologist Greg Jones discusses the impact climate change is having on growing grapes in MJ Daspits piece, One Cool Conversation with Greg Jones.

    In Part One of her series, Think Global, Wine Local, MJ Daspit discovers how international experience has influenced some of the Umpqua Valleys most prestigious wine makers!

    This August, plan on attending the 2015 Oregon Wine Experience week-long festival in Jacksonville, where you can learn more about the wines you love while supporting a great cause!

    Using professional wine tour companies to explore and discover is becoming more popular! Learn about the benefits from Paula Bandy in Explore Wine Country on a Wine Tour.

    Discover how Southern Oregon farmers markets are increasingly becoming a great source to pair local food with local wine in Sarah Lemons, A Perfect Blend, Farmers Markets & Wine!

    EDITOR'S LETTER / READING BETWEEN THE VINES

    CONTENTS / SUMMER 2015

    SOUTHERN OREGON WINE SCENE

    PUBLISHED BY Jacksonville Publishing LLC

    PUBLISHER & EDITORWhitman Parker

    DESIGN & LAYOUTAndrea Di Muzio Yancey

    PHOTO EDITS Ken Gregg

    MAPS EDITOR Laurel Briggs / Creative Marketing & Design

    OFFICE220 E California StreetHistoric Downtown JacksonvilleMAILINGPO Box 1114Jacksonville OR 97530

    sowinescene.comfacebook/southernoregonwinescene

    CONTACT USwhitman@sowinescene.comproduction@sowinescene.com541-899-9500 office541-601-1878 mobile

    PRINTED LOCALLY BY VALLEY WEB PRINTING Whitman Parker

    PerformancesArtistsfrom

    Vineyardsfrom StagestoArtisansto

    pull back the curtain Great

    Dailyon

    TravelMedford.org/wine

    13-40 / WINERY DIRECTORY 21-23 / REGIONAL MAPSApplegate Valley ...................13-17Rogue Valley .........................19-29 Jacksonville ...........................31-34Upper Rogue .........................36-37Umpqua Valley ......................38-40

    Applegate Valley ...................22Rogue Valley .........................21Jacksonville ...........................23Upper Rogue .........................23Umpqua Valley ......................39

    Our Winery, Tasting Room, Dining, Touring, Lodging & Retail indexhelps pair you up with fine, local businesses in Wine Country.

  • SOUTHERN OREGON WINE SCENE / SUMMER 20154

    aving a conversation with viticultural climatologist Greg Jones is much like drinking a glass of premium wine. With his bright intensity, Jones could be

    compared to a fine vintage himself and after imbibing his fruit-driven wisdom, I invariably come away feeling smarter and better looking.

    For our latest discussion, I found Professor Jones in his office on the Southern Oregon University campus where he is Director of the Division of Business, Communication and the Environment and professor and research climatologist in the Environmental Science and Policy Program. Though his official titles cover diverse areas of study, they all come together in a glass of Southern Oregon wine. How so? Winemaking is an agricultural enterprise, starting with the selection of a vineyard site and culminating in the production of grapes, but it is also the art and science of fermenting the juice and making decisions as to aging and blending to create the best expression of a particular varietal. A third component is marketing the finished product, essentially competing with a world-wide wine selection that can be found at almost any supermarket. This daunting enterprise requires the skills of farmer and chemist, a finely-tuned palate and plenty of business savvy.

    It is with good reason that Jones is considered one of the most authoritative people in the wine world, one whose opinion is indispensable when it comes to deciding what variety of wine grape to plant where. Beginning with his doctoral thesis on the climatology of viticulture in Bordeaux, France, he has collected data on climate, hydrology, soils, weather and growing techniques in vineyards all over the world, helping to describe and define viticultural areas and assess best practices based on the quality of wines produced. His studies have also focused on climate change and sustainability in grape production, two increasingly hot topics in the wine world today. His contributions have earned him numerous accolades. He made Decanter magazines 2009 Power List of the fifty most influential people in the wine world and was named Oregon Wine Press 2009 Wine Person of the Year. In 2012 and 2013 intowine.com listed Jones among the hundred most influential people in the US wine industry.

    In our region, with its emphasis on Pinot Noir, Jones is often called upon to evaluate sites for possible propagation of this cool weather varietal. Wait a minute. Did I say Pinot Noir is big in Southern Oregon? Yes, I did. Although this varietal has been famously identified with the northern reaches of our state, the Willamette

    H

    One COOL Conversationwith Greg Jones

    by MJ DASPIT

    The glass of wine youre drinking right now was influenced by many factors...from the grower to the wine maker to arguably the most important aspect of terroir...CLIMATE!

  • 5SOUTHERN OREGON WINE SCENE / SUMMER 2015

    Valley in particular, it has been the predominant wine grape produced in Southern Oregon for some years. The 2008 Oregon Vineyard and Winery Report compiled by the Oregon Field Office of the USDA, shows that in the Rogue Valley American Viticultural Area (AVA), consisting of Jackson and Josephine Counties, the greatest tonnage of a single varietal harvested was 622 tons of Pinot Noir, with Pinot Gris a distant second at 445 tons. The 2013 report compiled by the Southern Oregon University Research Center (SOURCE) puts Pinot Noir tonnage harvested in the Rogue Valley AVA at 1,788 tons, nearly a three-fold increase in five years. Pinot Gris again came in second at 1,029 tons.

    When you consider that wine grapes are typically produced where the growing season temperatures average between 53 and 71 degrees Fahrenheit and that Pinot Noir occupies an even narrower temperature band, 57.2 to 60.8 degrees, the fact that Oregons most southerly AVA is a Pinot Noir growing area is indeed surprising. When I ask how this is possible, bearing in mind toasty Rogue Valley summers, Jones explains that at sites suitable for Pinot Noir, temperatures are moderated by aspect and elevation. Slopes that receive primarily morning light are cooler than those with western exposure. Think of it as being similar to your house, he says. You wouldnt grow the same plants on the shady side as you would on the sunny side. With its northeast-facing slopes, DANCIN Vineyards, just outside Jacksonville, is a good example of the cooling effect of aspect. Higher vineyard elevations in the southeastern part of the Rogue Valley AVA also result in cooler temperatures. A good example of a higher site that produces excellent Pinot Noir is Irvine Family Vineyards in Ashlands Bear Creek Drainage, where vines thrive on east-facing slopes at 2,100 feet. What makes our Southern Oregon wine region so special is that growing sites run the