Spring 2016 Southern Oregon Wine Scene

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Southern Oregon Wine Scene magazine showcases the wineries, tours, restaurants, lodging and more in Southern Oregon Wine Country!

Transcript of Spring 2016 Southern Oregon Wine Scene

  • SOUTHERN OREGON

    LIVING BETWEEN THE VINESSpring 2016WINE SCENE

  • MORRISONS RIVER FRONT LODGING & AWARD WINNING MEALS

    70 years of delivering breathtaking views, exceptional dining and

    the ultimate excuse to get away from it all.

    WWW.MORRISONSLODGE.COM 800.826.1963 www.WineHopperTours.com 855.550.WINE

    SOUTHERN OREGON WINERY TOURS

    The way wine country should be. Simple & Authentic

    Daily wine tours of the Applegate Wineries. Departing from Ashland, Medford and Jacksonville.

  • Thanks for taking this issue of Wine Scene along as you discover the spectacular Southern Oregon wine region!

    If you happen to be enjoying a glass of wine right now, I hope youre enjoying yourself at a winery featured on these pages. From north to south, Wine Scene is dedicated to introducing you to an all-star lineup of local wineries and telling the story of the people making it happen. Today, our Southern Oregon wineries are not only earning more medals at wine competitions, theyre creating a wide array of enjoyable on-site winery and tasting room experiences for visitors and locals.

    Increasingly, wineries are the new favorite place for people of all ages to gather and socialize with family and friends in a beautiful, natural environment. Indeed, for many singles, the wine scene is replacing the dreaded bar scene as a more upscale venue to meet and make new friends. Since wine is a natural complement to food, art and music, its now a major component of the regional tourism draw. And, for those lucky enough to call Southern Oregon home, its improved our quality of life in numerous ways. So no matter your favorite wine or winery, discover something special in Wine Scenefrom Ashland to Elkton!

    Along with amazing industry people working between the vines, our climate, geology, soil and topography enables 70+ grape varieties to grow here, making this one of the most remarkable wine-producing regions in the world. With an abundance of quality fruit, the effort of skilled farmers

    and winemakers is literally paying off in our glasses. And the best news is that the outside wine world has noticed, including writers and wine judges, as evidenced by Wine Enthusiast magazine naming Southern Oregon a must-visit destination and the host of medals won at the 2016 San Francisco Wine Competition.

    Enjoy your wine journey and thanks again for taking Wine Scene along for the ride as you discover the essence of the Southern Oregon wine scene.

    Cheers to Living Between the Vines!

    EDITOR'S LETTER / READING BETWEEN THE VINESSOUTHERN OREGON WINE SCENE

    PUBLISHED BY Jacksonville Publishing LLC

    PUBLISHER & EDITORWhitman Parker

    DESIGN & LAYOUTAndrea Di Muzio Yancey

    COVER PHOTO: Del Rio Vineyards' Assistant Winemaker, Aurlien Labrosse & Head Winemaker, Jean-Michel Jussiaume by Ashley Crenshaw, Gypsy Jane Photography

    MAPS Benchmark Maps

    OFFICE220 E California StreetHistoric Downtown JacksonvilleMAILINGPO Box 1114Jacksonville OR 97530

    sowinescene.comfacebook/southernoregonwinescene

    CONTACT US / TO ADVERTISEwhitman@sowinescene.comproduction@sowinescene.com541-899-9500 office541-601-1878 mobile

    PRINTED LOCALLY BY VALLEY WEB PRINTING

    Whitman Parker

    42 / INDUSTRY NEWSRecent industry news & events mirror Southern Oregons growing reputation as an award-winning wine producing region, from the accolades, to new celebrations, and educational opportunities.

    8 / DE-VINE WEDDINGSFrom rustic to rural and riverfront to refined, discover why more and more brides and grooms are holding their dream weddings at local wineries.

    20 / OUR GREAT CLIMATESOU Professor Greg Jones explains how and why Southern Oregons grape-friendly climate enables vineyards to be masters of all from Albarino to Zinfandel.

    4 / A GRAPE'S JOURNEYIn our continuing story, follow our grapes to learn more about the fascinating process of FERMENTATION and why its truly the essence of all great winemaking.

    6 / NEW TROON TOURSThe new Grape Expedition Tour at Troon offers visitors an insiders look into how a winery functionsfrom the vineyard, to the barrel room, and beyond.

    19 / BAMBU RESTAURANTFor Bambu's Chef Adam Ward, serving creative, Asian-inspired dishes sourced from the finest, local ingredients is as important as serving them alongside local wines.

    CONTENTS / SPRING 2016

    12-41 / WINERY DIRECTORYRogue Valley .........................12-21 Upper Rogue .........................22-25Jacksonville ...........................26-31Applegate Valley ...................32-39Umpqua Valley ......................40-41

    REGIONAL MAPSRogue Valley .........................13 Upper Rogue .........................23Jacksonville ...........................26Applegate Valley ...................33Umpqua Valley ......................41

    SOUTHERN OREGON WINE SCENE / SPRING 2016 3

  • hen we left off, our white grapes had gone skinless, seedless and pulpless to ferment

    typically in a stainless steel tank, but sometimes in-barrel. Our red grapes remained whole, perhaps still on the stem in an intact bunch, slightly crushed or macerated to release some juice. Red grapes are commonly set to ferment in square bins made of stainless steel or food-grade plastic. The bin has a removable cover that allows easy access so the winemaker can punch down the solids that rise to the top of the fermenting juice. The punch down re-mixes the juice, pulp, skin and seeds, called must, for maximum extraction of color and flavor.

    The conversion of the sugars in the grape juice to alcohol through the action of yeast is known as primary fermentation. Yeast is a living organism which needs relatively warm conditions and a food source to grow. Yeasts are everywherein soil, water and on plant surfaces. Todays modern winemaking, which emphasizes natural processes and as little intervention by the winemaker as possible, favors the use of naturally-occurring yeast for fermentation. Thus, the yeast arrives on the skin of the grapes as they come in from the vineyard and goes into the fermentation vessel with them. In the fermenter, the yeast feeds on sugars, produces byproducts (alcohol and CO2), reproduces and dies. Expired yeast falls to the bottom of the fermentation vessel, creating

    what the winemaker calls the lees. You may have seen the expression sur lie on the back of a bottle of Chardonnay or Sauvignon Blanc to describe how it was made. This French expression means that the winemaker stirred the lees back into the wine to intensify its flavor, very much like the punch down process for reds.

    When there is no more sugar in the juice for the yeast colony to feed on, the yeast expires and fermentation stops. At this point, the wine is fermented to dryness, meaning there is 0% sugar in the wine. In making some wines, such as German-style Riesling, the winemaker halts the fermentation process before all the sugar in the juice is consumed by the yeast. These wines are said to have residual sugar or RS. Fermentation can be halted by several factors including cold, the addition of distilled alcohol to the fermenting wine, as in the making of Port-style dessert wines, or the addition of Potassium metabisulfite. Any of these actions will kill off the yeast colony, preventing further primary fermentation.

    Fermentation usually takes a week to ten days. During this time, the winemaker will take samples of the juice to carefully measure the acidity, sugar content and alcohol percentage. This monitoring allows the winemaker to assess whether the wine is coming along nicely, or whether he needs to influence the process somehow. How? If the fermentation is

    stalledfor instance, if the yeast has quit working due to low brix (sugar content)the winemaker can add sugar. If the wine lacks the proper flavor profile, there are chemical additives such as tartaric acid that can enhance its character. Such measures are typically not necessary in a good year when the growing conditions are optimum. But in years when there was too much rain or too little sunshine to fully ripen the fruit, the winemaker is tasked with making up the shortfall of the crop with manipulation in the winery.

    But wait! Theres more! After primary fermentation, red wines are pressed off the must and transferred to barrel. Depending on the varietal, white wines may be bottled directly from the fermentation tank or they may be barreled. In-barrel, red wines and some whites typically undergo a second fermentation initiated by inoculation with lactic acid bacteria, typically Oenococcus oeni. Called malolactic fermentation, this process converts tart-tasting malic acid to softer-tasting lactic acid. Lactic acid imparts a creamy richness, called butter in the case of Chardonnays. Winemakers actively prevent malolactic conversion in varietals such as Riesling and Gewztraminer where a fruiter, floral character is desired in the finished wine.

    In our next installment of A Grapes Journey, well see what happens during the wines time in-barrel and why wines, unlike baseball teams, are often considered much improved by some time in the cellar.

    by MJ DASPITA Grape's Journey / FERMENTATION

    Photos courtesy of Del Rio Vineyards

    W

    From Tank to Barrel

    4 SOUTHERN OREGON WINE SCENE / SPRING 2016

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    SOUTHERN OREGON WINE SCENE / SPRING 2016 5

  • Behind The Cellar Doorby Anne Vid