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Transcript of September / October

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    SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2015 VOL. 24 NO.5

    Drug TestingInhouse Vs.Outsourced

    Latest Trends:Education, Technology & Reentry

    AGING INMATEPOPULATIONSA SPECIAL REPORT

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  • 22

    The Pulse

    Dementia in theIncarcerated: Ready or Not?

    Lab Services Prove Vital:Inhouse Vs. Outsourced

    Dispensing Medications:Policies & Procedures

    Aging Inmate Care: A Special Report

    Education, Technology & Reentry: Tying It All Together

    Ad Index

    SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2015

    48

    142230 4045

    CORRECTIONSFORUM

    Publisher & Executive EditorThomas S. Kapinos

    Assistant PublisherJennifer A. Kapinos

    West Northeast

    Editor-in-ChiefDonna Rogers

    Contributing EditorsMichael Grohs, Kelly Mason, Bill Schiffner, G.F. Guercio

    Art DirectorJamie Stroud

    CORRECTIONS FORUM (ISSN10729275)

    is published bi-monthly by:

    Criminal Justice Media, Inc 565 Pier Avenue

    PO Box 213Hermosa Beach, CA 90254

    (310) 374-2700

    Send address changes to:CORRECTIONS FORUM

    Subscription Department69 Lyme Rd.

    Hanover, NH 03755(603) 643-6551

    Subscriptions:Annual subscriptions for non-qualified personnel,

    United States only, is $60.00. Single copy or back issues - $10.00

    All Canada and Foreign subscriptions are $90.00 per year.

    Free digital issues are availablefor qualified Canadian and Foreign Subscribers Go to www.correctionsforum.net

    Printed in the United States of America,

    Copyright 2015Criminal Justice Media, Inc.

    Main Offices565 Pier Avenue

    PO Box 213Hermosa Beach, CA 90254

    (310) 374-2700

    Art Sylvie(480) [email protected]

    Peggy Virgadamo(718) 456-7329

    [email protected]

    Associate Publishers

    Central U.S. Sales ManagersBonnie Dodson

    (828) 479-7472

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  • MISSOURI GOV. COMMUTESDEATH SENTENCE

    Kimber Edwards, who was con-victed of hiring someone to kill hisex-wife in 2000, had his death sen-tence commuted by Missouri Gov.Jay Nixon on Oct. 2, after a news-paper reported that the murderernow says he acted alone, Reuterssaid.

    Edwards had been scheduled todie on Oct. 6 for his involvementin the death of Kimberly Cantrell.

    In a statement, Nixon, a Democ-rat, said he was convinced that theevidence supports the decision toconvict Edwards of first-degree mur-der, and that Edwards will remainin prison for the rest of his life.

    "This is a step not taken lightly,and only after significant consid-eration of the totality of the cir-cumstances," Nixon said.

    Orthell Wilson, who had saidEdwards hired him to kill Cantrell,has recently recanted his state-ment, telling a reporter that hehad acted alone, according to theSt. Louis Post-Dispatch.

    Edwards confessed to the crime,but said at his trial and ever sincethat he was innocent, the newspa-per said. His lawyers say Edwardshad a form of autism that couldhave made him vulnerable to ag-gressive interrogation techniques,and led to a false confession, thenewspaper said.

    Elsewhere on Oct 2, the Okla-

    homa Court of Criminal Appealsgranted a state request to halt threeupcoming executions so it can ex-amine a drug mix-up discoveredabout two hours before inmateRichard Glossip was to have beenput to death earlier that week.

    Oklahoma Attorney GeneralScott Pruitt filed the request onThursday so the state could exam-ine what went wrong with its exe-cution protocols. Glossip's plannedexecution had received global at-tention with his case raising ques-tions about whether the state maybe executing an innocent man andabout the drug combination Okla-homa plans to use in its lethal in-jection mix, reported Reuters.

    Oklahoma revised its death

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  • chamber protocols after a flawed ex-ecution last year when medical staffdid not properly place an IV line onmurderer Clayton Lockett, who wasseen twisting in pain on the gurney.He died about 45 minutes after theprocedure began because of an accu-mulation of lethal injection chemi-cals that had built up in his tissue.

    A total of 22 people have beenexecuted in the United States so farthis year, including six in Missouri,according to the Death Penalty In-formation Center.

    TRIPLE MURDERER ALFREDO PRIETO IS EXECUTED IN VIRGINIA

    The Washington Post reported Al-fredo Rolando Prieto, convicted of

    two murders in Fairfax County,one in California and linked byDNA and ballistics to six more, wasexecuted by lethal injection Oct 1at the Greensville CorrectionalCenter.

    Prieto, 49, said: I would like tosay thanks to all my lawyers, all mysupporters and all my family mem-bers. Get this over with.

    The short statement representedjust about the only words Prietohas ever said publicly since he wascaught 25 years ago. He neverspoke to detectives investigatinghis crimes, did not testify duringany of his four trials and nevergave an interview. In one hearingin Fairfax in 2010, he told a judgethat I was using a lot of drugs. I

    was drinking at the time of hisNorthern Virginia crimes in 1988.

    Prietos death was witnessed byDeidre Raver of Yorktown, N.Y.,the sister of Rachael A. Raver, whowas 22 when she was shot in theback in a vacant lot near Reston.She had watched Prieto fatallyshoot her boyfriend, Warren H.Fulton III, in the back while on hisknees, law enforcement authoritieshave said. Investigators believethat Raver ran but that Prietochased her down, shot her andraped her as she lay dying.

    Today ends a long and painfulordeal for my family, DeidreRaver said, that has haunted usfor over 26 years. I speak on behalfof my sister, Rachael Angelica, whowill have the last word after all....

    It was the first execution in Vir-ginia since January 2013 and thefirst by lethal injection since August2011. Prietos attorneys tried a lateappeal for a stay by challenging oneof the three drugs used to executehim, which Virginia obtained fromTexas in August. But U.S. DistrictJudge Henry Hudson denied the re-quest for a postponement.

    Prieto had spent the last quar-ter-century of his life behind bars.Prior to that, he did a two-yearstint as a teenager for a drive-byshooting in California. And in be-tween those two prison stays, po-lice believe, he fatally shot fourpeopleraping two of theminVirginia, then returned to Califor-nia and shot and killed five people,also raping two of them.

    In seeking to persuade a Fairfaxjury to impose a death sentence onhim, Fairfax Commonwealths At-torney Raymond F. Morrogh said in2010, Anyone who would commitcrimes this dastardly, amoral andinhuman is someone who poses athreat to society. CF

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  • Case Study

    A.C., an 82-year-old male withdiabetes, hypertension and coro-nary artery disease, was a first-time offender who entered thecorrectional system at anadvanced aged. Since his incar-ceration, he was also diagnosedwith dementia after cliniciansobserved that he was having diffi-culties in remembering.

    While this case raises severalchallenges around delivery of opti-

    mal care in patients with demen-tia, incarceration adds anotherlayer of complexity. For the pur-pose of this article we will focus onthe following challenges:

    (1) aging population in cus-tody

    (2) dementia and incarceration

    Aging population in custodyBaby boomers (over 71 million

    people born between 1946 and1964) are now aging into seniorcitizens and this, coupled with anincrease in life expectancy due to

    advances in medicine, has result-ed in a growing number of peo-ple with longer lifespans. Greaternumbers of senior citizens arenow living with one or morechronic disease conditions.Correspondingly, there is higherprevalence of chronic diseaseconditions in jails and prisons.(Binswanger, I., Krueger, P., &Steiner, J., 2009)

    Aggressive management ofchronic medical diseases by exist-ing health care delivery in pris-ons and jails and longer incarcer-

    8 CORRECTIONS FORUM SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2015 VISIT US AT WWW.CORRECTIONSFORUM.NET

    BY PARUL MISTRY, MD, MA, AND LEONORA MUHAMMAD, DNP, RN, CCHP

    Dementia in the Incarcerated

    Ready or Not?

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  • ation periods have led to a disproportionate increasein older inmates. In addition, a number of olderprisoners are sex offenders who pose a perceivedthreat to alternative housing solutions like skilledcare or assisted living facilities. Reports from various

    groups have projected that the number of prisonersaged 55 or older is growing at a higher rate than theoverall prison population. Ronald Aday, a professorof aging studies and author of Aging Prisoners: Crisisin American Corrections, predicts that by 2020, 16%percent of those serving life sentences will be in thisage group (Aday, R., 2003). The American CivilLiber