Olathe South High School - South High School 1640 E. 151st Street, Olathe, KS 66062 May 2014 ... By...

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  • Olathe South High School 1640 E. 151st Street, Olathe, KS 66062

    May 2014 To Incoming AP Language and Composition (English III) Students: You are now officially a college student! Why? Because this is a college-level course! You can earn college credit by taking and passing the AP Language and Composition exam in May of 2015. We will meld the American literature survey course with AP test preparation throughout the year. We have enclosed a sample of the types of multiple choice and essay questions found on the exam to give you an idea of what the actual test looks like. (You dont have to complete these questions.) Now, for the summer reading! During freshman and/or sophomore year, the work load was designed to prepare you for this college class; we regard Pre-AP English II as a college prep course, so if you were enrolled in Pre-AP, no doubt you are used to the challenging expectations of the AP program, experiencing homework every night, including weekends and holidays. The summer reading keeps you actively engaged in the learning and critical thinking processes that are part of our program. Moreover, it is your opportunity to make a favorable first impression by thoroughly performing the tasks assigned. All students will complete the following summer reading requirements:

    By June 24th, you will have compiled a list of literary terms and rhetorical devices, with a definition and example for each; you must also add its use/function for those with an asterisk. An example is provided. Keep these saved on your computer as we will be adding to this reference guide throughout the year. Feel free to access online sources and cut and paste theseits a guide. Hand this in to the office by NOON on June 24th. You will sign your name as evidence of the time you dropped this off. Our secretaries are not available after noon; please dont wait until the last minute to hand in your assignment and chance your watch being off by five or ten minutes.

    By July 16th, you will have read one of the following: And Still We Rise by Miles Corwin, The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls, The Devil in the White City by Erik Larson, or Stiff: The Curious Life of Human Cadavers by Mary Roach. You must complete a dialectical journal for your selection and hand this in to the office by NOON on July 16th. You will sign your name as evidence of the time you dropped these off. Again, please dont wait until the last minute to hand in your assignment and chance your watch being off by five or ten minutes. We have included a sample student journal entry in the packet, so there should be no confusion regarding expectations and the proper format. N.B.: During 1st quarter, you will read one of the other four books as an independent reading assignment.

    As always, we expect you to work on these assignments individually; these are not group projects unless you are willing to divide your grade with other students.

    IF you were not enrolled in Pre-AP sophomore year, you must complete two additional assignments in order to be able to participate in the discussion referring to the work Pre-AP students completed during their sophomore year.

    By July 2nd, before noon, complete an allusion assignment that provides an introduction to Greek/Roman mythology and Biblical references. Because literature abounds with these allusions, your knowledge of these allusions is imperative. Detailed instructions and examples are attached, as well as the required list of allusion topics.

    By July 23rd, before noon, you must read and submit a dialectical journal for Charlotte Brontes Jane Eyre, the novel read by Pre-AP students this past year. You will take an objective test over the book the second week of school. Jane Eyre is a novel that applies to most of the open-ended questions on the AP Literature test. (READ THE BACK)

  • Deadlines are never to be taken lightly. Do not depend on others to hand in your work for you; remember, you are now a college student! If the workload transcends your expectations, we would advise that you see a counselor immediately about an enrollment change (i.e. before the end of the school year). If you come to this realization during the summer, please contact the counselors by the third week of June. Know that our summer reading program is indicative of the summer reading requirements of AP programs all over the United States; since the AP exam is a global exam, you will be competing with students from all over the world. Therefore, it is important that we maintain high standards. We have made every effort to provide you with models illustrating what we expect your summer reading assignments to look like; therefore, we expect you to make the same effort to meet those expectations. If you have any questions about the assignment, please feel free to email us over the summer at mgibbensos@olatheschools.org or csmithos@olatheschools.org . If you will be out of town the days of the deadlines, attach your assignment to a file and email it to us before the deadlines (isnt technology wonderful!). If you lose this packet, this assignment is also available on the Olathe South website www.olathesouth.net under Quick Links AP Summer Assignments. We are looking forward to working with all of you! With a strong work ethic and sense of humor, we shall meet the challenges of AP Language and Composition! Onward and upward! Sincerely,

    Marci Gibbens Marci Gibbens AP Language and Composition

    Catherine Smith Catherine Smith AP Language and Composition OSHS English Department Co-Chair

    mailto:mgibbensos@olatheschools.orgmailto:csmithos@olatheschools.org

  • Assignments: 1. Dialectical Journals. While reading the book you have selected, identify a passage every 1/4 of the book that exemplifies elements of style or rhetoric. (If you have a 300-page book, you need a passage every 75 pages; for a 250-page book, every 60 pages, etc.) Set your margins at 1 all the way around; your font should be Times New Roman, no larger than 12 point. Double-space both the passage and your analysis. Using a two-column entry format, type a full-column passage into the left column, followed by the page number on which the passage was found. At the top of the passage, label the elements of style or rhetoric the passage exemplifies. In the right column, analyze the elements used by the writer to convey his/her purpose and explain how these elements prove the writers point or enhance the writers message, characterization, etc. Your analysis must fill the entire right column (the length of the page). We would suggest you format these by inserting a table. Format all margins to 1 (top, bottom, left, right). SEE SPECIFIC DIRECTIONS AND MODEL ATTACHED! Note: You must select lengthy passages that illustrate a combination of two or three elements, thus assuring a full-page analysis/commentary in the right hand column. Elements: a. diction involves the particular words the author uses to make his point; usually these are words

    with a significant emotional connotation b. detailsthink of details as phrases that are more factual and unemotional c. figurative language not to be interpreted literally (similes, metaphors, personification,

    analogies, conceits, etc.); used to aid the author in creating characterization, mood, etc. d. imagery the authors use of sensory words to create emotions, mood, characterization e. irony verbal/situational/dramatic; the expectation contrasts with the reality to emphasize/

    convey a specific point f. sentence structure use of repetition, parallelisms, length to emphasize ideas, heighten the

    drama, etc. g. tone the authors opinion of his subjects and audience as expressed through the characters actions and speech. Tone is implied and revealed through diction; it is subject to change throughout the novel. Do not discuss tone aloneyou must also discuss the elements that REVEAL tone. Do not confuse AUTHOR tone with a characters tone of voice or with MOOD. (Distinction between author and character tone is especially important in And Still We Rise.) 2. Literary Terms/Rhetorical Devices Reference Guide. Insert a table of three columnsone for the term and definition, one for an example, and one for its use/function (use/function column completed only for those terms asterisked):

    1. ad hominem attack* 2. alliteration* 3. allusion* 4. amplification* 5. analogy* 6. anaphora* 7. antithesis* 8. aphorism 9. apostrophe (the lit term,

    NOT the punctuation) 10. appositive 11. asyndeton*

    12. bandwagon appeal* 13. chiasmus* 14. colloquialism* 15. ellipsis (the lit term, not

    the punctuation)* 16. ethos* 17. euphemism* 18. hasty generalization* 19. hyperbole* 20. juxtaposition* 21. litotes* 22. logos*

    23. metonymy 24. mixed metaphor* 25. oxymoron* 26. parallelism* 27. paradox* 28. pathos* 29. personification* 30. polysyndeton* 31. rhetorical question* 32. synecdoche 33. verbal irony*

  • Dialectical Journal/Reference Guide Samples

    N.B.: You will be held closely accountable this year for your ability to follow directions. Especially when teachers provide specific directions and VISUAL EXAMPLES, it is imperative that you demonstrate close attention to detail.

    You will read one of the following: And Still We Rise by Miles Corwin, The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls, The Devil in the White City by Erik Larson, or Stiff: The Curious Life of Human Cadavers by Mary Roach.

    1. Set margins 1 all around (top, bottom, left, right). Insert Table. 2 columns, 2 rows.

    2. As you read, look for passages in which the writer is trying to make a point through the use of two or more rhetorical devices.

    3. Each passage in the left