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  • Lean & Agile Project Management for Large Programs & Projects

    Dr. David F. Rico, PMP, ACP, CSM

    Twitter: @dr_david_f_rico Website: http://www.davidfrico.com

    LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/davidfrico Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1540017424

  • Author Background  DoD contractor with 28+ years of IT experience  B.S. Comp. Sci., M.S. Soft. Eng., & D.M. Info. Sys.  Large gov’t projects in U.S., Far/Mid-East, & Europe

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    Published six books & numerous journal articles Adjunct at George Washington, UMUC, & Argosy Agile Program Management & Lean Development Specializes in metrics, models, & cost engineering Six Sigma, CMMI, ISO 9001, DoDAF, & DoD 5000 Cloud Computing, SOA, Web Services, FOSS, etc.

  •  Need for Agile Project Mgt. Intro to Agile Project Mgt.

    Types of Agile Project Mgt.

    Phases of Agile Project Mgt.

    Scaling of Agile Project Mgt.

    Metrics for Agile Project Mgt.

    Summary of Agile Project Mgt.

    Agenda

    3

  • Today’s Whirlwind Environment

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     Overruns  Attrition  Escalation  Runaways  Cancellation

    Global Competition

    Demanding Customers

    Organization Downsizing

    System Complexity

    Technology Change

    Vague Requirements

    Work Life Imbalance

    Pine, B. J. (1993). Mass customization: The new frontier in business competition. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

  • Software Century

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     No. of software-intensive systems is growing  80% of US DoD functions performed in software  Major driver of cost, schedule, & tech. performance

    Kennedy, M. P., & Umphress, D. A. (2011). An agile systems engineering process: The missing link. Crosstalk, 24(3), 16-20.

  • Global Project Failures

    6 Standish Group. (2010). Chaos summary 2010. Boston, MA: Author. Sessions, R. (2009). The IT complexity crisis: Danger and opportunity. Houston, TX: Object Watch.

     Challenged and failed projects hover at 67%  Big projects fail more often, which is 5% to 10%  Of $1.7T spent on IT projects, over $858B were lost

    16% 53% 31%

    27% 33% 40%

    26% 46% 28%

    28% 49% 23%

    34% 51% 15%

    29% 53% 18%

    35% 46% 19%

    32% 44% 24%

    33% 41% 26%

    0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%

    1994

    1996

    1998

    2000

    2002

    2004

    2006

    2008

    2010

    Ye ar

    Successful Challenged Failed

    $0.0

    $0.4

    $0.7

    $1.1

    $1.4

    $1.8

    2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

    Tr ill

    io ns

    (U S

    Do lla

    rs )

    Expenditures Failed Investments

  • Traditional Projects

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     Big projects result in poor quality and scope changes  Productivity declines with long queues/wait times  Long projects are unsuccessful or canceled

    Jones, C. (1991). Applied software measurement: Assuring productivity and quality. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

    Size vs. Quality

    D ef

    ec t

    D en

    si ty

    0.00

    3.20

    6.40

    9.60

    12.80

    16.00

    0 2 6 25 100 400

    Lines of Code (Thousands)

    Size vs. Productivity

    C od

    e P

    ro du

    ct io

    n R

    at e

    0.00

    1.00

    2.00

    3.00

    4.00

    5.00

    0 2 6 25 100 400

    Lines of Code (Thousands)

    Size vs. Requirements Growth

    P er

    ce nt

    ag e

    0%

    8%

    16%

    24%

    32%

    40%

    0 2 6 25 100 400

    Lines of Code (Thousands)

    Size vs. Success P

    er ce

    nt ag

    e

    0%

    12%

    24%

    36%

    48%

    60%

    0 2 6 25 100 400

    Lines of Code (Thousands)

  • Requirements Defects & Waste

    8 Sheldon, F. T. et al. (1992). Reliability measurement: From theory to practice. IEEE Software, 9(4), 13-20 Johnson, J. (2002). ROI: It's your job. Extreme Programming 2002 Conference, Alghero, Sardinia, Italy.

     Requirements defects are #1 reason projects fail  Traditional projects specify too many requirements  More than 65% of requirements are never used at all

    Other 7%

    Requirements 47%

    Design 28%

    Implementation 18%

    Defects

    Always 7%

    Often 13%

    Sometimes 16%

    Rarely 19%

    Never 45%

    Waste

  • Need for Agile Project Mgt.

     Intro to Agile Project Mgt. Types of Agile Project Mgt.

    Phases of Agile Project Mgt.

    Scaling of Agile Project Mgt.

    Metrics for Agile Project Mgt.

    Summary of Agile Project Mgt.

    Agenda

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  • What is Agility?  A-gil-i-ty (ə-'ji-lə-tē) Property consisting of quickness,

    lightness, and ease of movement; To be very nimble  The ability to create and respond to change in order to

    profit in a turbulent global business environment  The ability to quickly reprioritize use of resources when

    requirements, technology, and knowledge shift  A very fast response to sudden market changes and

    emerging threats by intensive customer interaction  Use of evolutionary, incremental, and iterative delivery

    to converge on an optimal customer solution  Maximizing BUSINESS VALUE with right sized, just-

    enough, and just-in-time processes and documentation Highsmith, J. A. (2002). Agile software development ecosystems. Boston, MA: Addison-Wesley.

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     

  • What is Agile Project Mgt.?

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     People-centric way to create innovative solutions  Market-centric model to maximize business value  Alternative to large document-based methodologies

    Agile Manifesto. (2001). Manifesto for agile software development. Retrieved September 3, 2008, from http://www.agilemanifesto.org

    also known as

    Customer Collaboration

    Individuals & Interactions

    Working Systems

    Responding to Change

    Customer Interaction

    High Performance Teams

    Iterative Development

    Adaptability or Flexibility

    Contract Negotiation

    Processes & Tools

    Comprehensive Documentation

    Following a Plan

    Agile Methods ‘Values’

    also known as

    also known as

    also known as

    valued more than

    valued more than

    valued more than

    valued more than

    Agile Methods ‘Principles’

    Traditional Methods ‘Values’

  • How do Lean & Agile Intersect?

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     Agile is naturally lean and based on small batches  Agile directly supports six principles of lean thinking  Agile may be converted to a continuous flow system

    Womack, J. P., & Jones, D. T. (1996). Lean thinking: Banish waste and create wealth in your corporation. New York, NY: Free Press. Reinertsen, D. G. (2009). The principles of product development flow: Second generation lean product development. New York, NY: Celeritas. Reagan, R. B., & Rico, D. F. (2010). Lean and agile acquisition and systems engineering: A paradigm whose time has come. DoD AT&L Magazine, 39(6).

      

    Economic View

    Decentralization

    Fast Feedback

    Control Cadence & Small Batches

    Manage Queues/ Exploit Variability

    WIP Constraints & Kanban

    Flow PrinciplesAgile Values

    Customer Collaboration

    Empowered Teams

    Iterative Delivery

    Responding to Change

    Lean Pillars

    Respect for People

    Continuous Improvement

    Customer Value

    Relationships

    Customer Pull

    Continuous Flow

    Perfection

    Value Stream

    Lean Principles  Customer relationships, satisfaction, trust, and loyalty  Team authority, empowerment, and resources  Team identification, cohesion, and communication

    Lean & Agile Practices

     Product vision, mission, needs, and capabilities  Product scope, constraints, and business value  Product objectives, specifications, and performance  As is policies, processes, procedures, and instructions  To be business processes, flowcharts, and swim lanes  Initial workflow analysis, metrication, and optimization  Batch size, work in process, and artifact size constraints  Cadence, queue size, buffers, slack, and bottlenecks  Workflow, test, integration, and deployment automation  Roadmaps, releases, iterations, and product priorities  Epics, themes, feature sets, features, and user stories  Product demonstrations, feedback, and new backlogs  Refactor, test driven design, and continuous integration  Standups, retrospectives, and process improvements  Organization, project, and process adaptability/flexibility

  • Pine, B. J. (1993). Mass customization: The new frontier in business competition. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

    Agile Project Management

     High levels of uncertainty and unpredictability

     High technology projects

     Fast paced, highly competitive industries

     Rapid pace of technological change

     Research oriented, discovery projects

     Large fluctuations in project performance

     Shorter term, performance based RDT&E contracts