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    Learning Objective: To identify and analyse links between stories.

    Floodland Reading Comprehension

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    What have been some of the main events in the story so far?

    Who are some of the most important characters

    that Zoe has met?

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    “And how do you think people have survived? How do people remember who they are and where they’re from? And how do they know what it means to be human, what makes us more than animals? How do they pass these things on to their

    children? Stories, that’s how.” […] “What’s the point in surviving if you forget how to be human?” said William.

    “Stories walk the truth into existing.”

    This is a quote from William as he talks to Zoe about his stories.

    What do you think he means as he’s saying this?

    How do stories help people?

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    Can you think of a story that has taught you something?

    What kind of story was it? What is it called when a story has an

    intended ‘lesson’ to be taught?

  • Do you know the stories mentioned above? Can you explain what the morals of these stories are?

    Do you know any other stories with a moral? Can you think of a time where you have used or

    experienced these lessons in your own life?

    Stories of all kinds can be used to teach us important life skills, especially when we are younger.

    The lessons being taught by stories are often called ‘morals’ and are a key part of fables such as ‘The Lion and the Mouse’, ‘The Hare and the Tortoise’,

    ‘The Boy who Cried Wolf’ , etc.

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    William says that he has the same name as his favourite author: William Blake.

    Have you heard of William Blake

    before?

  • William Blake was born in 1757 in London and was an English poet,

    painter and printmaker. He decorated his works with beautiful

    paintings and prints, however his poems were not well known until after

    his death in 1827. He was a Christian, but he believed

    that people should interpret the stories and teachings from the Bible in their own way, creating their own

    mythology to follow.

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    William references Blake’s poetry throughout the story.

    Golgonooza Udan-Adan Golgonooza is a mythical city in

    Blake’s work. It is seen as city of salvation ‘walled against Satan’.

    The city lies to the west of the Udan-Adan.

    The Udan-Adan is described as a huge lake in Blake’s work. Blake

    states that Norwich ‘stands trembling on the brink [of Udan-Adan]’ and

    that if you travelled west across the lake, you’d reach Golgonooza.

    Why do you think William teaches these references to Zoe and the Eels?

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    Throughout their time together on Eels Island, William is trying to help Zoe by telling her stories he thinks she could learn from. But he doesn’t remember all of the details.

    “Well, there was a man called… oh I can’t remember, but anyway, he built a boat

    see?” […] “And then it began to rain, a lot. So, all the animals were getting wet, too, and he put

    them all aboard the boat, too.”

    “There was a doctor and his name was…” […] “Anyway, he went

    somewhere, and there was a big puddle of

    water, and he stepped in it. So he never went

    there again.”

    “You think it’s just the name of your boat?

    Lyca, Zoe, is the little girl lost.”

    “Do father, mother weep, ‘Where can Lyca sleep?’

    Lost in desert wild, is your little child…”

    “There was this monk, see, who built a pair of wings. His name was Brother Elmer. […] He

    thought he could fly. Well, he jumped off the tower,

    see?”

    Do you recognise what any of these stories could be?

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    “Well, there was a man called… oh I can’t remember, but anyway, he built a boat

    see?” […] “And then it began to rain, a lot. So, all the animals were getting wet, too, and he put

    them all aboard the boat, too.”

    “There was a doctor and his name was…” […] “Anyway, he went

    somewhere, and there was a big puddle of

    water, and he stepped in it. So he never went

    there again.”

    “… then don’t try to fly, will you. There was this monk, see, who built a

    pair of wings. His name was Brother Elmer. […]

    He thought he could fly.”

    Brother Elmer True Story - 11th century

    Doctor Foster Nursery Rhyme

    William Blake - ‘The Little Girl Lost’ Poem

    Noah’s Ark Bible story

    “You think it’s just the name of your boat?

    Lyca, Zoe, is the little girl lost.”

    “Do father, mother weep, ‘Where can Lyca sleep?’

    Lost in desert wild, is your little child…”

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    Let’s have a go at finding the morals of these stories.
 Why do you think William told them to Zoe to help her?

    “Well, there was a man called… oh I can’t remember, but anyway, he built a boat

    see?” […] “And then it began to rain, a lot. So, all the animals were getting wet, too, and he put

    them all aboard the boat, too.”

    “There was a doctor and his name was…” […] “Anyway, he went

    somewhere, and there was a big puddle of

    water, and he stepped in it. So he never went

    there again.”

    “… then don’t try to fly, will you. There was this monk, see, who built a

    pair of wings. His name was Brother Elmer. […]

    He thought he could fly.”

    “You think it’s just the name of your boat?

    Lyca, Zoe, is the little girl lost.”

    “Do father, mother weep, ‘Where can Lyca sleep?’

    Lost in desert wild, is your little child…”

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    Plenary “And how do you think people have survived? How do people remember who they are and where they’re from? And how do they know what it means to be human, what makes us more than animals? How do they pass these things on to their

    children? Stories, that’s how.” […] “What’s the point in surviving if you forget how to be human?” said William.

    “Stories walk the truth into existing.”

    Do you think William’s stories helped Zoe? Do you agree that stories help people learn

    what it means to be human?