Fish locomotion Notes

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Transcript of Fish locomotion Notes

  • Fish Locomotion

  • The most common form of fish locomotion is called carangiform locomotion.

  • The most common form of fish locomotion is called carangiform locomotion.

    Fish that use this form sweep their caudal fin from side to side to push themselves forward.

  • Angulliform locomotion is used by fish with eel-like bodies. Obviously this includes eels, but also some Agnathan fishes such as lampreys use it.

  • Angulliform locomotion is used by fish with eel-like bodies. Obviously this includes eels, but also some Agnathan fishes such as lampreys use it.They send waves along the length of their body and as the waves move down the body, they push against the water.

  • Angulliform locomotion is used by fish with eel-like bodies. Obviously this includes eels, but also some Agnathan fishes such as lampreys use it.They send waves along the length of their body and as the waves move down the body, they push against the water.There is an opposite and equal force in the opposite direction. So if the body pushes against the water, the fish is pushed forward.

  • Some fish have a very stiff body and cannot flex their tail or send waves down the length of it. One way they can swim is to wiggle their fins to push themselves forward.

  • Some fish have a very stiff body and cannot flex their tail or send waves down the length of it. One way they can swim is to wiggle their fins to push themselves forward.

    Unfortunately this form of locomotion, called ostraciform, is very slow. To protect themselves, many of these fish have sharp spines covering the skin or poisons that taste bad to predators.

  • Because theyre slow, sea horses cant swim against strong currents of if waves toss them about. To compensate, they use their prehensile tail to hold onto sea grasses, sea fans, etc.

  • A few fish use a form of locomotion called labriform locomotion. These fish paddle with their pectoral fins and, for the most part, keep their caudal fins and others still.

  • Another form of locomotion, called ballistiform locomotion, is accomplished when the fish sends waves along the length of the its fins.

  • Another form of locomotion, called ballistiform locomotion, is accomplished when the fish sends waves along the length of the its fins.

    This can include the pectoral fins, in the case of rays and skates, or the anal fin, in the case of knifefish.

  • If a knifefish reverses the direction of the waves it sends along its anal fin, it swims backwards!