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    CANADIAN MUSEUM OF CIVILIZATION CORPORATION CMCC-2082

    CONTRACT SECTION, FINANCIAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES

    CMCC-2082 Design of Canadian History Hall Page 55 of 88

    4.10. INTEGRATING INTERPRETATION BY FRONTLINE STAFF

    In terms of defining and developing the interpretive activities offered by frontline staff in school programs,

    tours and animation experiences, it will be necessary for the team to work closely with Visitor Services,

    Public Programs, target audiences and specialists.

    5. Detailed Storyline and Communication Intentions

    A high-level storyline is presented below, composed of broad topics and more focused communicationintentions. At this stage in our planning process, the storyline is meant only to list the main topics that theHall will explore, and how these might be organized. This is still a preliminary, draft storyline, and iscurrently in the process of being organized, expanded, and re-formulated for many months to come.

    Zone I: The Land and its First People (15,000 BP to AD 1500)

    Communication Intention: Canada has a history stretching back many thousands of years. Long before thearrival of the first Europeans, Canada was well and truly occupied by First Peoples.

    Topic Message Intention

    1. Aboriginal peoples settle Canada at

    the end of the last Ice Age, as the great

    ice sheets melt and the land becomeshabitable.

    a. Ancestral First Nations enter the

    Western Hemisphere from northeastern

    Asia as nomadic hunter-gatherers.b. Spreading out across the continent, they

    adapt to a variety of environments.

    2. As they adapt to their newenvironments Aboriginal Peoples

    differentiate into a large number oflocal and regional cultures, anddevelop rich and sustainable ways of

    life.

    a. Most Aboriginal Peoples in Canadacontinue to live as hunter-gathers.

    b. Only in the comparative warmth ofsouthern Ontario do settled agriculturalvillages develop.

    c. Coastal British Columbia also sees the

    development of settled, relativelycomplex societies, based on

    exceptionally abundant marine

    resources.

    3. By the time Aboriginal Peoples,

    ultimately from eastern Asia, first

    meet Europeans on the Atlantic coastof Canada around A.D. 1000,humanity has finally encircled the

    globe.

    a. The Inuit are among the last Aboriginal

    groups to expand into Canada, arriving

    from Arctic Alaska around A.D. 1200.b. When they arrive in the eastern Arctic,they meet early Norse (Viking) hunters

    from Greenland.

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    CANADIAN MUSEUM OF CIVILIZATION CORPORATION CMCC-2082

    CONTRACT SECTION, FINANCIAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES

    CMCC-2082 Design of Canadian History Hall Page 56 of 88

    Zone 2: The River of Canada (14971763)

    Communication Intention: After a century of coastal exploration and seasonal fishing, Europeannewcomersspecifically the Frenchestablish permanent agricultural colonies in the Atlantic region and inthe St. Lawrence River Valley. The St. Lawrence provides an ideal avenue into the continents interior, as

    trade and military alliances with First Nations become increasingly important to the new colony.

    Topic Message Intentions

    1. Canada has its origins in the early

    seventeenth century, with permanent

    French settlements in Acadia and the St.

    Lawrence River Valley.

    a. French, Basque and English fishermen

    are fishing the waters off eastern Canada

    as early as A.D. 1500 (and perhaps

    earlier).b. Early explorers chart coastlines and river

    valleys during the period 14971600.

    c. Quebec is established by the French in1608, essentially as essentially a fur-

    trading post.

    d. The subsequent agricultural settlement

    of the St. Lawrence River Valley leads tothe establishment of a French colonial

    regime and a modest influx ofhabitants.

    2. Less prosperous than the Thirteen

    Colonies to the south, New France comes

    to depend more on the fur trade with

    Aboriginal peoples as its economicraison dtre, rather than on subsistence

    farming.

    a. With cold winters and tight government

    regulations, New France is never as

    populous or prosperous as English

    colonies to the south.b. New France fur traders establish close

    political and economic ties with First

    Nations, and build a thriving fur trade inthe western hinterland, exploring from

    the Mississippi River to the Gulf of

    Mexico.c. Particularly after the Great Peace of

    1701, New France establishes important

    military and strategic alliances with First

    Nations.

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    CANADIAN MUSEUM OF CIVILIZATION CORPORATION CMCC-2082

    CONTRACT SECTION, FINANCIAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES

    CMCC-2082 Design of Canadian History Hall Page 57 of 88

    Zone 3: Into the Anglosphere (17551838)

    Communication Intention: The Conquest is the major turning point in Canadian history, bringing an almostexclusively francophone Canada under British colonial control, and into the orbit of English-speaking NorthAmerica.

    Topic Message Intentions

    1. During the Seven Years War, New

    France is conquered by Great Britain,

    and a new British colonial governmentis established.

    a. Expulsion of the Acadians, 1755.

    b. The Battle of the Plains of Abraham

    (1759; confirmed in the Treaty ofParis, 1763).

    c. The Quebec Actof 1774 sees Catholic

    legal disabilities lifted, and someFrench-language rights guaranteed.

    d. The Conquest and subsequent Quebec

    Actare both important factors leadingto the American Revolution in the 13

    British colonies to the south.

    2. United Empire Loyalists arrive in theaftermath of the American Revolution.

    a. Political refugees loyal to the BritishCrown establish Upper Canada and also

    settle in Lower Canada and Nova

    Scotia.b. They represent the first significant

    English-speaking settlement of Canada,

    inaugurating a political and linguistic

    duality that persists to this day.

    3. America attempts an invasion of British

    North America during the War of 1812.

    a. Fighting alongside British regulars,

    English Canadians in Upper Canada,and French Canadians in Lower Canada

    successfully defend our borders.

    b. Aboriginal participation on the

    Canadian/British side is instrumental in

    this success.

    4. Montral-based fur traders explore

    western Canada to the Pacific,establishing a fur trade empire across

    the whole northern half of the continent.

    a. The North West Company, based in

    Montral, is established in 1779.b. The North West Company threatens the

    interior-supply lines of the London-

    based Hudsons Bay Company.c. North West Company explorers map

    and explore western Canada to the

    Arctic and Pacific Oceans.d. A trade war between the two

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    CANADIAN MUSEUM OF CIVILIZATION CORPORATION CMCC-2082

    CONTRACT SECTION, FINANCIAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES

    CMCC-2082 Design of Canadian History Hall Page 58 of 88

    companies ends with amalgamation in1821.

    e. The fur trade has a growing impact on

    First Nations, who are now becoming

    part of the world economic system.

    5. Sidebar: The extinction of the Beothuk a. The Aboriginal inhabitants of

    Newfoundland are pushed intoextinction by settler fishing populations

    and Mikmaq moving onto the island

    from the Maritimes.b. There is a pattern of pilfering, sabotage

    and murder, on both sides, accentuated

    by the social isolation of the Beothukand their severed access to maritime

    resources.c. The last-known Beothuka woman

    and her nieceare captured, settling inSt. Johns. The two women are the

    authors of almost everything we know

    of their people.

    6. Unrepresentative colonial governments

    inspire unsuccessful popular rebellions

    in both Upper and Lower Canada.

    a. The 1837 Rebellion in Upper Canada

    occurs in reaction to an absence of

    meaningful self-government, a corruptcolonial administration, and the

    aspirations of a rising colonial elite. A

    small-scale affair, it is easilysuppressed.

    b. A related rebellion in Lower Canada

    takes on aspects of a cultural struggleagainst an alien (British) governing

    class, and is much more serious,

    repressed only with considerable

    difficulty and bloodshed.

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    CANADIAN MUSEUM OF CIVILIZATION CORPORATION CMCC-2082

    CONTRACT SECTION, FINANCIAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES

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    Zone 4: Confederation and Consolidation (18381885)

    Communication Intention: The fledgling colonies of British North America negotiate self-government andConfederation in a peaceful transfer of power from the British Crown. By 1885, the new country has grownto occupy the whole northern half of North America, as Aboriginal Peoples are displaced by a growing tide

    of European settlement.

    Topic Message Intentions

    1. Responsible self-government is

    achieved.

    a. The Union of the Canadas punishes

    Lower Canada for its role in the

    Rebellions.b. The Durham Report calls for the

    assimilation of French Canada, but

    also the establishment of responsibleself-government.

    c. Responsible government is achieved