Winter 2008 Romo

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C C o o m m m m u u n n i i q q u u é é Winter 2008 S S S T T T U U U D D D E E E N N N T T T C C o o l l l l e e g g e e o o f f C C o o m m m m u u n n i i c c a a t t i i o o n n s s http: //communications.fullerton.edu http: //communications.fullerton.edu http: //communications.fullerton.edu B RITTANY RITTANY K KUHN UHN graduated in 2005 with a double major in Journalism and American Studies. She decided to volunteer for the Peace Corps after graduating. This is an account of her experience with the Peace Corps. My palms were sweating as I tore open the much anticipated information packet sent from Peace Corps headquarters. It was all very official, the letterhead with my name on it, the prominent logo. As I quickly scanned the invitation for the name of the country where I would serve as a volunteer for two years, my eyes landed on the name of a country I did not recognize: Cape Verde. Chances are, if you live anywhere other than Boston, where a majority of Cape Verdeans live, you’ve never heard of it either. After all, the country’s creation myth claims that on the seventh day when God finished creating the world and wiped his hands clean, the crumbs that fell into the ocean became Cape Verde, otherwise known as the Forgotten Islands. The country I serve in is an elusive mix of everything. A blend of Portugal, Brazil, America and Africa, the archipelago consists of ten unique islands that offer everything from isolated windswept beaches, mountainous misty forests, giant salt flats and black volcanic lava flows. Each island has a different dialect of Kriolu, special traditional dishes, a unique cultural dance that defines that region. There are top-of-the-line luxury hotels a block from dusty ghettos. It is as much an assortment of drum beats and rural agricultural subsistence as it is ‘50 Cent’ beats and technological development. I am still getting used to seeing teenagers walk out of shacks who look dressed to perform in the latest hip-hop videos. Such is life in a country going through the growing pains of graduating from third world to developing status. My home is the volcanic island of Fogo, which means “fire.” I am an English teacher to seventh and eighth graders in a rural community that is located on the slope of the volcano’s crater. I bring in water from a well in buckets on top of my head. The electricity is unreliable. Mosquito nets are a must. When I was ten I decided I wanted to be a Peace Corps volunteer. It was a dream that always appeared visible just beyond the horizon. Now that I am 17 months into service, I can say it was the best decision I ever made. There are daily struggles: living without running water and electricity are challenges that do not compare to the cultural adjustments necessary to thriving in community development work. Yet, Peace Corps, above all, is about relationships. It is about finding yourself living in a place completely foreign to you, maybe even a place you didn’t even know existed, and watching in amazement as it becomes home. ESPRIT ESPRIT de de PEACE CORPS PEACE CORPS For more information on the Peace Corps, check out their website: peacecorps.gov

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Page 1: Winter 2008 Romo

CCoommmmuunniiqquuéé Winter 2008 SSSTTTUUUDDDEEENNNTTT

CCoolllleeggee ooff CCoommmmuunniiccaattiioonnss http: //communications.fullerton.eduhttp: //communications.fullerton.eduhttp: //communications.fullerton.edu

BBRITTANYRITTANY K KUHNUHN graduated in 2005 with a double major in Journalism and American Studies. She decided to volunteer for the Peace Corps after graduating. This is an account of her experience with the Peace Corps.

My palms were sweating as I tore open the much anticipated information packet sent from Peace Corps headquarters. It was all very official, the letterhead with my name on it, the prominent logo.

As I quickly scanned the invitation for the name of the country where I would serve as a volunteer for two years, my eyes landed on the name of a country I did not recognize: Cape Verde. Chances are, if you live anywhere other than Boston, where a majority of Cape Verdeans live, you’ve never heard of it either. After all, the country’s creation myth claims that on the seventh day when God finished creating the world and wiped his hands clean, the crumbs that fell into the ocean became Cape Verde, otherwise known as the Forgotten Islands.

The country I serve in is an elusive mix of everything. A blend of Portugal, Brazil, America and Africa, the archipelago consists of ten unique islands that offer everything from isolated windswept beaches, mountainous misty forests, giant salt flats and black volcanic lava flows. Each island has a different dialect of Kriolu, special traditional dishes, a unique cultural dance that defines that region. There are top-of-the-line luxury hotels a block from dusty ghettos. It is as much an assortment of drum beats and rural agricultural subsistence as it is ‘50 Cent’ beats and technological development. I am still getting used to seeing

teenagers walk out of shacks who look dressed to perform in the latest hip-hop videos. Such is life in a country going through the growing pains of graduating from third world to developing status. My home is the volcanic island of Fogo, which means “fire.” I am an English teacher to seventh and eighth graders in a rural community that is located on the slope of the volcano’s crater. I bring in water from a well in buckets on top of my head. The electricity is unreliable. Mosquito nets are a must.

When I was ten I decided I wanted to be a Peace Corps volunteer. It was a dream that always appeared visible just beyond the horizon. Now that I am 17 months into service, I can say it was the best decision I ever made. There are daily struggles: living without running water and electricity are challenges that do not compare to the cultural adjustments necessary to thriving in community development work. Yet, Peace Corps, above all, is about relationships. It is about finding yourself living in a place completely foreign to you, maybe even a place you didn’t even know existed, and watching in amazement as it becomes home.

ESPRIT ESPRIT dede PEACE CORPS PEACE CORPS

For more information on the Peace Corps, check out their website: peacecorps.gov

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To download an application or for more information on the program, please visit: http://communications.fullerton.edu/news/Student_news/Florence.htm

NAME: Open to all Communications major students.

DURATION: Four weeks spent in Florence, Italy with Session B starting on July 13, 2008 and ending on August 13, 2008.

SCHOOL COURSES OFFERED: Receive class credit for COMM 334 Feature: Travel Writing (Fulfills the COMM 351 requirement) & COMM 426 - Italian Cinema.

PAYMENT: Fees are approximately $3,770 including a $450 enrollment deposit.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: Enrollment deposit is due on April 18, 2008.

CONTACT: AANTHONYNTHONY F FELLOWELLOW (Comm department chair) [email protected] FFREDRED Z ZANDPOURANDPOUR (Associate Dean) [email protected]

A HA HEARTFELTEARTFELT V VISITISIT

Did you know that volunteerism relieves stress! A wonderful opportunity is available to Cal State Fullerton students, faculty, and staff. Hop on board a bus at 6 a.m. and visit a Corazon de Vida (Spanish for “Heart of Life”) orphanage in Tijuana, Mexico. Volunteers spend time doing arts, crafts, recreational activities, and just being friends and mentors to the children. The next CSUF trips are scheduled Saturday March 1 or April 12. Requires a $25 bus trip fee.

To sign up, call (714) 278-7623 or visit www.fullerton.edu/deanofstudents/volunteer

For more orphanage information, please visit: www.corazondevida.org

HHAVEAVE YOUYOU DONEDONE YOURYOUR INTERNSHIPINTERNSHIP YETYET? ? All COMM and RTVF students are required to complete an internship in order to graduate. The summer ‘08 deadline is February 15. To sign up, please visit https://commrtvfinternship.fullerton.edu/commandrtvfstudents.htm for more information. Also, talk to PPAMAM C CALDWELLALDWELL in the internship office located in CP 460-24.

SSSTUDYTUDYTUDY A A ABROADBROADBROAD INININ FFLORENCELORENCE, I, ITALYTALY

2007 Summer Cohort

LINKS TO SUCCESS

The new year marks the start of a spring semester filled with new opportunities available to students. Explore resources and begin your year right! You can start by following these links to success:

A newly revamped website for the college Academic Advisement Center provides the academic information from knowledgeable advisor, TTAMMYAMMY R ROGERSOGERS. For a successful collegiate experience, be sure to check out hours of operation so that you can access timely help.

http://communications.fullerton.edu/advisement.center/

Some $30,000 in scholarships and awards are presented annually to all Communications/RTVF/ H-Comm students. Not only do scholarships look great on resumes, but offer a welcome boost to any student’s career. Apply now:

http://communications.fullerton.edu/scholarships/

Some important scholarship deadline dates:

Communications: March 13

Human Communication Studies: April 11

Radio-Tv-Film: April 4

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SSSUMMERUMMERUMMER I I INTERNSHIPNTERNSHIPNTERNSHIP: : : WASHINGTON, D.C.

Interning in Washington is a great way to prepare for a career for students from a variety of backgrounds. Students majoring in programs as diverse as Communications, Business, Philosophy, and Political Science have enjoyed working in D.C. through the summer program in a variety of offices.

“The program has been very important for my academic and professional development,” says Jeffrey Gonzalez, who interned with the Senate Budget Committee in both 2006 and 2007. He adds, “I have made key contacts in D.C. and hopefully they will lead to future employment. Washington is a beautiful and exciting city that offers important experiences that can’t be duplicated on the west coast.”

The Cal State D.C. program is now in its third year of offering students opportunities to spend a summer studying abroad and working in the world of politics in our nation’s capital. Through the program, students enroll in two separate three unit classes while interning in Washington. Internships range from congressional offices, executive agencies, political parties, advocacy groups, non-profits, and a variety of other offices in and around Washington, D.C. Juniors, seniors, and graduate students from all majors are encouraged to apply.

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis. If students want financial assistance through the program, they must apply and indicate an interest in financial assistance by February 15. The program includes assistance in securing an internship, an academic component for students to earn academic credit, housing assistance, and the possibility of scholarships.

COMMENCEMENT COMMENCEMENT MMAYAY 17, 2008! 17, 2008!

Please visit: http://www.fullerton.edu/

commencement/ for more information.

DDEBATEEBATE T TAKESAKES C CENTERENTER S STAGETAGE

The recent success of the movie The Great Debaters opens up the intense world of forensics. The film, which stars and is directed by Denzel Washington, explores the early days of forensics and how it was used to facilitate social change. CSUF’s own debate squad boasts a pretty impressive streak of success at the national level. The program also sponsors the Southern California Urban Debate League (SCUDL) that offers high school students the chance to experience first-hand the world of forensics. Recently, H-Comm department chair JJOHNOHN R REINARDEINARD attended a special screening of The Great Debaters as a representative of the SCUDL. This star studded event was held at the

Landmark Theater in Los Angeles and generated considerable press coverage for organizations such as SCUDL.

Some recent stats from our forensics season: LLUISUIS MMAGALLONAGALLON and CCAITLINAITLIN G GREYREY took

5th place at the Alan Nicols Invitational Forensic Tournament at USC on

December 29-31, 2007. In the same tournament (junior level), the team of JJEANETTEEANETTE R RODRIGUEZODRIGUEZ and JJOELOEL S SALCIDAALCIDA

captured 3rd place. In addition, Rodriguez and Salcida were named 11th and 8th speakers respectively in their division. Also competing were EELECIALECIA B BARKSDALEARKSDALE who was named 9th speaker and EELIZALIZA R RAMIREZAMIREZ recognized as 11th speaker overall.

Information sessions in UH 521 will be offered on:

February 5 (Tuesday): 12p.m. - 1p.m. & 5p.m. - 6p.m. February 6 (Wednesday): 4p.m. - 5p.m.

For more information, contact DDRR. S. STEPHENTEPHEN J. S J. STAMBOUGHTAMBOUGH at [email protected] or visit the website for more information and application materials:

http://hss.fullerton.edu/polisci/wip/index.asp

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http://communications.fullerton.eduhttp://communications.fullerton.edu

CCoolllleeggee ooff CCoommmmuunniiccaattiioonnss Dean - Rick Pullen, [email protected] Associate Dean - Fred Zandpour, [email protected] Assistant Dean - Peggy Garcia Bockman, [email protected] Chair, Department of Communications - Anthony Fellow, [email protected] Chair, Department of Human Communication Studies - John Reinard, [email protected] Chair, Department of Radio-TV-Film - Ed Fink, [email protected] Newsletter Editor - Karen Alonzo, [email protected]

GERMANY: I arrived in Munich on Friday afternoon already a little tired from my travels. I took the subway to Marienplatz (the city center) to walk around and grab dinner. After a few hours I headed back to the hotel. From what I saw, Munich was wonderful. I met my friend Claudia at the subway station on Saturday afternoon. We talked for hours over lunch about everything and anything. It felt good to have an old friend to talk to. We headed to Oktoberfest. I didn't know what to expect, so I was quite shocked when we walked up to the festival and saw that it resembled a county fair. There were rides, food booths, games, and beer brewery tents. It was a great experience. I really got a feel for German culture, especially with their traditional outfits. It seemed that EVERYONE (not just the workers) wore the outfits. It was pretty interesting to say the least.

EGYPT: I am very lucky to report that I went to Cairo, Egypt for my birthday. Eight friends and I packed our stuff and went on a cruise to Egypt. On the first night my friend and I had a wonderful dinner, which also became to my birthday celebration. We all dressed up to make it a formal event. The staff also surprised me by singing “Happy Birthday” and giving me a flower and a piece of cake. It was a small affair, but I enjoyed every bit of it. In fact, the next day we had to be up by 6 a.m. to be out of the ship by 7 a.m. Tuesday was a long day because we took a 3 hour bus ride from Port Said to Cairo. It was a bit scary since we had police escorts on both sides and behind the bus, but luckily everything was fine. There are no words to explain what I felt when I caught my first glimpse of the Great Pyramids. All my life I have seen these wonders and NEVER imagined that I would actually be there, especially at 22. I know that I am blessed and very lucky to be here. After the Pyramids and the Sphinx we headed to the papyrus factory and had lunch on the Nile River. I couldn't believe that I was eating houmus, pasta, bread, and ice cream on the Nile River!

ISRAEL: My Thanksgiving was interesting this year. I wasn't able to have a Thanksgiving dinner because I had to catch a flight to Israel at 9 p.m. It only took us 45 minutes to get to Israel from Cyprus, which was the quickest flight I have ever been on! That Sunday we went on a tour that took us around Jerusalem and Bethlehem. In particular, going to Bethlehem was interesting since Israel and Palestine are in conflict. Israel built a wall around the Palestinian border and has tight security where showing a passport is necessary. Officials looked at our passports 3 times and spent about 10 minutes each time looking through them. They asked us quite invasive questions like, "Why are you in Israel," "Do you know anyone in Israel," "Where did you go," "Where did you stay," etc… After the questions we had our bags checked for security BEFORE we checked into our flight. We had to go through metal detectors and take off our shoes while they looked through our belongings. Then we finally checked in our bags and ran to our gate. Luckily we made it and flew home on time. I LOVED Israel because the food was delicious and the people were nice and extremely helpful.

Overall, my study abroad experience during the Fall 2007 semester was, in a word, unforgettable. SSIGNINGIGNING OFFOFF,, AANNETTENNETTE R ROMOOMO

ADVENTURES WITH ANNEADVENTURES WITH ANNETTETTE IN GERMANY, EGYPT, & ISRAEL

Marienplatz in Munich

The Great Pyramids and the Sphinx

To read past Adventures with Annette entries, please check out all issues of the Student Communiqué newsletter at:

http://commstudents.fullerton.edu/studentnewsletter/index.html

It is recommended to start planning to study abroad at least a year in advance. Visit the Study Abroad offices in UH-244 or visit:

http://www.fullerton.edu/studyabroad