What can you see? What can you hear? What can you touch? What can you smell? What can you taste?

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Transcript of What can you see? What can you hear? What can you touch? What can you smell? What can you taste?

Take the end of a film and use it as a starting point for a piece of writing

What can you see?

What can you hear?

What can you touch?

What can you smell?

What can you taste?

LO: To create a vivid 1950s American setting

By the end of the lesson you will have:

Cused detail based on sense impressions (what can be seen, heard, smelt, touched or tasted)Binvented metaphors and similes to bring places alive and make the setting more believable A/A*created atmosphere (eg. what is hidden, what is dangerous, what looks unusual)Setting14/06/12using detail based on sense impressions what can be seen, heard, smelt, touchedor tasted basing settings on known places plus some invented detail using real or invented names to bring places alive to help to make the setting more realand more believable creating atmosphere, e.g. what is hidden, what is dangerous, what looks unusual, what isout of place using the weather, time of day and season as well as place lulling the reader into a false sense of security that all is well2In the following paragraph, underline words and phrases that draw on the senses of sight, hearing, smell, touch, and taste.Rocking-Chair SaturdayOur screened porch is a peaceful place to read and relax on a Saturday afternoon. Sitting in a creaking wooden rocker, I look through the gauzy wire screen into the back yard. From the top of a pine tree, a mockingbird scolds. In the distance, I hear the sleepy drone of a neighbors mower. A slight breeze wafts the tempting aroma of grilling hamburgers toward me. Prudence, my calico cat, pads out to join me, stretching out in a warm patch of sun near the screen door. I scoop her warm, furry body into my arms as she rumbles her approval. She settles into my lap, content to sit with me and enjoy the peace of the back porch.In the following paragraph, underline words and phrases that draw on the senses of sight, hearing, smell, touch, and taste.Rocking-Chair SaturdayOur screened porch is a peaceful place to read and relax on a Saturday afternoon. Sitting in a creaking wooden rocker, I look through the gauzy wire screen into the back yard. From the top of a pine tree, a mockingbird scolds. In the distance, I hear the sleepy drone of a neighbors mower. A slight breeze wafts the tempting aroma of grilling hamburgers toward me. Prudence, my calico cat, pads out to join me, stretching out in a warm patch of sun near the screen door. I scoop her warm, furry body into my arms as she rumbles her approval. She settles into my lap, content to sit with me and enjoy the peace of the back porch.Task: Describe a 1950s American small town setting

CB/AYou have used some punctuation (,)You have used some effective word choices (You have used five sensory details: sight, hearing, smell, touch, and taste (You have used one metaphor (a place that time had forgotten)You have used a range of long and short sentencesYou have used a full range of punctuation (; :)You have used sophisticated word choices to invoke atmosphere (a town, cloistered away in the middle of nowhere)You have used figurative language to invoke sensory description (; You have used a consistent narrative point of view.Success Criteria

For level 8 write a sonnet in iambic pentameter!!

5Seek thy inspiration from these picture prompts.Teacher print these off and groupwork?

6

glimpse, lemon grass, shimmering sun tranquility, a twittering mochingbird, rustling,

gritty, cushioned, foamy,

earthy, cilantro perfumed

sour, sweet, bitterCilantro perfumed coriander13Uses description to paint a picture.the lawn started at the beach and ran towards sun-dials and brick walls and burning gardens finally when it reached the house drifting up the side in bright vines as though from the momentum of its run. The front was broken up by a line of French windows, glowing now with reflected gold and [...]

so that the reader can visualize the people in her story. Because humans perceive the world through our senses of sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell, describing in terms of the five senses is an effective way to make a subject real and concrete to readers.14