Volume 1, Issue 1 Administrative Bulletincl Adult Education Wishes Mr. Roger Hansard a Happy...

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Transcript of Volume 1, Issue 1 Administrative Bulletincl Adult Education Wishes Mr. Roger Hansard a Happy...

  • 1

    Submissions:

    All submissions should be

    emailed to Cissy Stanifer at

    staniferm@k12tn.net and

    Candida Sullivan at

    candidasullivan@yahoo.com.

    Requested Format:

    Microsoft word documents

    (all other formats such

    as .pdf files, faxes, or hand

    written submissions have to

    be reformatted or retyped)

    Requested Font:

    Times New Roman

    Size:

    10 or 12 point

    Deadline:

    The first of every month.

    Please keep in my mind any

    submission received after the

    first may not be included in

    that month’s bulletin. If you

    are running late, please send

    an email to notify us and we

    will save room in the bulletin

    for your submission.

    A Note from the Director of Schools ■ How much homework should students have? ………………………………………………..2

    Congratulations ■ Educators Recognized for Thirty Plus Years of Experience………………………………….3

    Retirement ■ Retired Teachers Meeting……………………………………………………………………...5

    ■ Claiborne County Retirees…………………………………………………………………….5

    ■ Adult Education Wishes Mr. Roger Hansard a Happy Retire-

    ment…………………………….5

    Professional Development

    ■ Representation in the Math Class……………………………………………………………...6 ■ H1N1 [Swine Flu] Preventative Actions……………………………………………………...6

    ■ Tennessee Diploma Program Changes………………………………………………………...7

    ■ Moving E-mail Address Book to Webmail.k12tn.net………………………………………...8

    ■ What is a 504 plan?.......................................................................................................... ..........8

    ■ The WIA Youth Program……………………………………………………………………..8

    ■ Changes in Adult Education…………………………………………………………………...8

    ■ Professional Development for Best Practices…………………………………………………9 ■ The Family Resource Center…………………………………………………………………..9

    ■ Claiborne High School student Samantha Killion to start-up Teen Trendsetters™, a nationally

    award-winning youth mentor program…………………………………………………………10

    ■ The Music and Art Education Program……………………………….……………………...11

    School News and Events ■ Clairfield Elementary School News………………………………………………………….12

    ■ Ellen Myers Primary School News…………………………………………………………..12

    ■ Forge Ridge School News…………………………………………………………………...13

    ■ H.Y. Livesay Middle School News…………………………………………………………13

    ■ Midway Elementary School News…………………………………………………………...14

    ■ The Alpha School News…………………………………………………………………….14

    ■ Springdale Elementary School News………………………………………………………..15

    ■ Soldiers Memorial Middle School News…………………………………………………….15

    ■ TNT Primary School News…………………………………………………………………..16

    Employee Announcements ■ Ellen Myers Primary School Welcomes New Staff………………………………………….16

    ■ H.Y. Livesay Middle School Welcomes New Staff………………………………………….16

    ■ TNT Primary School Welcomes New Staff………………………………………………….16

    Important Information ■ Updates and Reminders….………………………………..………………………………….17

    ■ School Board Meetings Schedule…………………………………………………………….18

    Claiborne County Schools

    September 15, 2009

    Volume 1, Issue 1

    Administrative Bulletin

    mailto:staniferm@k12tn.net mailto:candidasullivan@yahoo.com

  • 2

    A Note from the Director of Schools

    How much homework should students have? Dr. C. Eddie Shoffner, Director of Schools

    We are getting off to a great start in Claiborne County. Our students are in the classrooms, and our teachers are

    teaching. As we start this year, we get to the age old questions – how much time should students spend on homework

    each school night, Sunday through Thursday?

    Based on being the parent of three children, three very successful adults, serving as a classroom teacher in both ele-

    mentary and high school, being a principal in elementary, middle school and high school, talking to many parents and

    many students, here is my perspective:

    Grade School: One (1) hour maximum

    High School: Two (2) hours maximum

    College: As much time as is necessary

    Parents and educators often disagree on the amount of homework necessary for student success. Some parents and teachers

    think that large amounts of homework are necessary for student progress, while others believe that work should be done

    while the teacher is present to provide guidance and instruction. Many parents and educators believe that after six (6), seven

    (7), or eight (8) consecutive hours in school the students need a break and then limited time at home studying.

    In college, classes are split more throughout the day. Hours generally are fewer, so longer homework periods are desirable

    and necessary. Most working parents average eight (8) hours a day on the job. After that, many might have a second job and

    sometimes have other diversions.

    Students deserve the same. That doesn’t mean that they shouldn’t spend any evening time reading or writing as long as some

    of it is for fun and not just to fulfill an assignment for the next day. At every grade level, some time in sports, the arts, other

    extra circular activities, or on the job business experience is as important as book learning.

    Some other views on homework: The kind of homework matters as much as the amount. According to Dennis Van Roekel,

    National Education Association president, homework should help students master the subject and spark their imagination

    while leaving time for other activities.

    Alfie Kohn, author of the Homework Myth, writes don’t just quibble about how much homework. Ask why kids must work a

    second shift at home since research finds that homework before high school yields absolutely no benefits.

    I’ve always found as a rule of thumb that the student should do ten (10) minutes per grade level, and you can travel that on

    up from the first grade to the eighth grade and at the max, that would be an hour and twenty minutes. Some of that time

    could be well spent on leisurely reading or some activity involving their parents such as sitting down at a meal with the par-

    ents and discussing their homework.

    In high school, I still will stick to the two hour maximum. I believe that most homework should be supervised by the teachers,

    and the teacher needs to help and guide students to insure homework is being completed accurately. Homework should be

    given only after the teacher has determined that the student completely understands the concept addressed on homework

    assignments. A great emphasis should be placed on vocabulary.

    September 15, 2009

    Volume 1, Issue 1

    Administrative Bulletin Claiborne County Schools

  • 3

    Congratulations

    Educators Recognized for Thirty Plus Years of Experience Dr. Janet Barnard

    Claiborne County Educators with thirty plus years experience with the Claiborne County School System were recog-

    nized at the August 3, 2009 county-wide in-service program, held at Claiborne High School. As the thirty plus years edu-

    cators’ names were called and projected onto the stage screen at the front of the multipurpose room at CHS, these educa-

    tors were presented with a certificate and a service pin commemorating their years of devoted service to the school sys-

    tem. The total years of service, represented by this distinguished group of thirty plus years educators, amounted to 1782

    cumulative years of work with the Claiborne County School System. The following is a list of educators honored at this

    ceremony:

    Teresa Adams 30 years Jodi Kennedy 31 years

    Larry Anderson 35 years Nila McNew 36 years

    Myra Anderson 35 years Linda Mundy 38 years

    Pauline Ausmus 43 years Neta Munsey 32 years

    Dr. Janet Barnard 35 years Herbert Parks 33 years

    Lynn Barnard 37 years Dan Pearman 36 years

    Vivian Barnard 32 years Warren Pearson 35 years

    Alice Bolinger 39 years Troy Poore 35 years

    Wade Breeding 33 years Dan Redmond 32 years

    Alice Brooks 31 years