Types of Poetry - Schudio 2020-05-01¢  6. What is the rhyme scheme or rhyming pattern? =...

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Transcript of Types of Poetry - Schudio 2020-05-01¢  6. What is the rhyme scheme or rhyming pattern? =...

  • Year 7 Independent Workbook

    Types of Poetry

    This workbook contains English lessons for the next 2 weeks. There are 6 lessons to complete and each lesson is designed to support your learning in the following key areas:

    Vocabulary

    These activities will introduce important vocabulary for this particular unit, helping you to develop an understanding of key concepts in English.

    Wider reading

    These activities will encourage you to read and to research more widely around a topic, developing your independence and building cultural capital.

    Memory

    These activities are designed to test your recall of key facts, developing memory skills which you will need for assessments and GCSE examinations.

    Technical accuracy

    These activities will focus on the accuracy of your spelling, punctuation and grammar, helping you to develop crucial literacy skills.

    Creativity

    These activities will prompt you to engage creatively with a task, demonstrating an independent approach.

    Personal response

    These activities will encourage you to respond to a given text or task, supporting you to develop your evaluation and critical thinking skills.

    Please note that many of you will be working at different speeds and levels. Please complete as much as you can of each lesson within an hour. If you are moving through the activities quickly, refer to the KS3 Cultural Enrichment Pack on the school website for extension activities. If you do not have access to a printer, complete the activities in your English book or on paper.

  • Lesson 1:

    Vocabulary

    These activities will introduce important vocabulary for this particular unit, helping you to develop an understanding of key concepts in English.

    To begin with, let’s see what you remember about English word classes (which you will need to use for analysing texts as you progress through school)… as well as a few poetic and descriptive techniques…

    Task 1: Match up the word class (e.g. noun/verb/adjective/adverb…) with the example box which shows that particular word class in bold. Then in the box beside it, write a definition of what that word class is. Check your definition against a dictionary definition – ARE YOU CORRECT?

    e.g.

    Try to make your definition as detailed as you can…

    NOW… Have a go at matching up the boxes

    below. Then add your definiton...

    The waves smashed against the cliffs, beating and bashing the rocks with fierce anger, as the water churned into froth.

    Golden and gleaming, the distant ball of sun beamed down, warming the ground in its huge smile.

    Above me, I could hear blackbirds singing; behind me, there was only the faint sound of the wind, as I lay on the grass.

    Panting heavily, the boys sank down on the sofa. They yawned loudly. The Joe Wicks workout had worn them out totally!

    The secret to success in life is love and happiness.

    noun

    The queue outside the supermarket was coiled around the carpark like a long snake.

    A word used to identify any person, place or thing.

    A word (other than a pronoun) used to identify any person, place or thing. These can be general things (common noun), things that can be touched (concrete noun), things that can’t be touched, like emotions (abstract noun), and particular things like names of people and places (proper noun).

    noun

    verb

    adverb

    adjective

    preposition

  • 3

    Extension Task:

    Now that you feel confident on these word types, can you write a diamante poem? This is a diamond shaped poem with 16 unrhymed words which follows this structure:

    Noun Adjective, Adjective

    Verb, Verb, Verb Noun, Noun, Noun, Noun

    Verb, Verb, Verb Adjective, Adjective

    Noun

    Here are some examples:

    This poem is all about monsters using synonyms:

    Monsters Evil, Spooky

    Howling, Shrieking, Wailing Ghosts, Vampires, Goblins, Witches

    Flying, Scaring, Terrifying Creepy, Crawly

    Creatures

    This poem is all moves from a cat to a dog using contrast and antonyms:

    Cat Gentle, Sleepy

    Purring, Meowing, Scratching Whiskers, Fur, Collar, Leash Barking, Licking, Digging

    Slobbery, Playful Dog

    Well done! Now let’s see what you remember about general poetic/descriptive techniques…

  • A lot of figurative language techniques are used in poetry. You have used them yourself, in your descriptive writing already. Sometimes they are referred to as ‘imagery’ because they help to create images and meanings in the mind of the reader.

    Task 2: Draw an arrow to Match up the following techniques to their examples…

    Then, for each technique, in the blank box next to each example, write your own sentence which uses that technique…

    (For some, more than one technique could be applied. If so, pick one to do your own example for.)

    The huge building sat there, waiting.

    Its giant brick arms seemed to surround me in a way that was either welcoming or suffocating – I couldn’t tell which.

    The wind blew, blustering about the bald brick building and back again.

    Whoosh…bang…bang!

    The tiny saplings which were newly planted shuddered and shivered and shook… and so did I.

    Looking up, I saw the glass front of the building: it reflected the blue sky like an upright lake.

    It was a giant’s mirror, which reflected everything behind me, as I walked nervously towards its shine.

    metaphor

    onomatopoeia

    simile

    personification

    alliteration

  • 5

    Do you remember what RHYME and RHYTHM are, from your work on Romantic Poetry? Just to remind yourself, before you start, write down their definitions below:

    Now… What do you already know about different types of poetry?

    Task 3:

    Label what type of poem you think the following are (There are two examples for each). As you do, make a list of their particular features… (e.g. how many lines/rhyme/rhythm..)

    Pick from: SONNET, HAIKU, LIMERICK, BALLAD, CINQUAIN, METAPHOR POEM,

    SIMILE POEM… Label each pair of poems, taking care that your spelling is correct.

    Poetic Technique Definition

    Rhyme

    Rhythm

    1

    2

  • - (by Samuel Taylor Coleridge)

    Flint

    An emerald is as green as grass, A ruby red as blood; A sapphire shines as blue as heaven; A flint lies in the mud.

    A diamond is a brilliant stone, To catch the world’s desire; An opal holds a fiery spark; But a flint holds a fire.

    - Christina Rossetti

    3

    4

    5

  • 7

    6

    7

  • Lesson 2:

    Wider reading

    These activities will encourage you to read and to research more widely around a topic, developing your independence and building cultural capital.

    So what IS poetry? Watch the TED-Ed animation ‘What makes a poem…a poem?’

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwhouCNq-Fc

    The aim of this lesson is to delve more deeply into one of these particular types of poetry forms, which will be our main focus: SONNETS! So, with that in mind…

    Task 1:

    Watch the animated TED-Ed lesson (5.22mins) on ‘Why Shakespeare loved iambic pentameter’ by David Freeman and Gregory Taylor:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I5lsuyUNu_4

    It introduces more vocabulary to do with poetry: syllables, poetic meter (rhythm), Dactyl, Trochee, Iambs, Iambic Pentameter.

    The three terms underlined above are elements which are very important in writing sonnets. Make sure you know what they are. Re-watch the Shakespeare video again and make a note of what you think these are in the grid below:

    Poetic terms:

    What is it?

    Syllables

    Poetic meter

    Iambic

    Pentameter

  • 9

    Task 2:

    Look at the following examples of sonnets. Then answer the questions below…

    Find out

    more:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_New_Colossus = ‘The New Colossus’ is a Petrarchan sonnet by American poet Emma Lazarus, who wrote it in 1883 to raise money for the construction of a pedestal for the Statue of Liberty.

  • [Spenser]

    (1795-1821)

    Sonnet 18… by William Shakespeare:

    (1564-1616 – published 1609)

    1. What do they all have in common? List as many things as you can:

    _________________________________________________________________