To Aid Grads

of 10 /10
Rec'COlilmillee Wideas 'Scc,pe To Aid Grads DR. WILLIAM T. TAYLOR The Committee on Recom- mendations for Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental and Science Stu- dents has increased its size and scope. Dr. William T. Tay- lor, PhD, Professor of Biol- ogy and Chairman of the Com- mittee outlined the new poUcy this week to the HOYA. He indicated the increased benefits for Gradu- ate school candidates, and revealed the new Committee members. In addition, Dr. Taylor re-emphasized the usefulness of the Committee and expressed confidence that the past eight years of its existence have aided many graduate school hopefuls. The policy itself, 'as stated by Dr. Taylor, is ",to expedite a man's candidacy to professional or grad- uate school." This policy is marked by a new emphasis on evaluation from many quarters for the sci- ence major. Each candidate must bold interviews with several mem- bers of the Committee on separate occasions. If the case of an indi- vidual student requires additional reviewing, the entire Committee will interview the student in ques- tion aI.1d hear his reasons for ap- plying to graduate school. As indicated by the application sheet distributed to each Commit- tee member, -a candidate is evalu- ated by the usual criteria of grades, class standing and honors. Added to these impoI'ltant and essential qualifications are various, relative- ly abstract evaluation aids such as; aptitude, appeal'ance, reli'ability, intensity of purpose and other simil'ar questions. The final evalu- -ation sheet also indicates extra- curricular activities in which the student h'as eng'aged. The benefits are indicated by the equality of evaluation given to every candid'ate. The Honors Pro- gram students, the BS (science) majors and the AB (science) ma- jors receive -an equal opportunity for graduate school. The Committee's new members include: The Rev. Arthur E. Gor- don, S.J.; Mr. Frank A. EVlans, MA; and the Rev. John L. Ryan, S.J. The other members of the Committee include; Dr. Arthur A. Espenscheid, Dr. John W. Howley, Dr. Charles L. Beckel, -and Dr. Taylor. These men represent a body of educators which can evaluate a student on his all-around ability. Moreover, these men have dealt personally with the oandidates either in class or in various other facets of student life. Dr. Taylor believes that this Committee g,ives the student a go-al towards which he can strive. To augment the 'Committee's work the Chairman of the Committee urges the science students to learn the admission requirements of their preferred graduate school. By doing this, the Recommendations Committee can advise the student of course requirements and ways to improve their chances of admission. Vol. XLI, No. 6 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY, WASmNGTON; D. C. Thursday, October 29, 1959 WELL STACKED ... Library worker needs home for 10,000 new volumes acquired yearly. Maguire dining hall will eventually open its doors to the needy worthies. Maguire Provides rood ro .. Thought by AlRoss The fate of Maguire dining hall has been decided. It will continue to provide nourishment, but now it will be food for thought. The library plans to take over and convert it into the main reference room. It will replace the Randall Reference Room which will in time become the Reserve Book Room. Dalai Lama's Kin To Address IRe Gyalo Thondup, the elder brother of the Dalai Lama of Tibet, will address the International Relations Club of George- town University tonight at 8 :00 in the Palmes Lounge. The official representative of his Holiness the Dalai Lama in the United States, Mr. Thondup has just presented the Tibetan case before the United Nations. As a result of his efforts, a BROTHER TO GOD-KING Gyalo Thondup. resolution censoring Com- munist China's intervention in Tibetan affairs has been re- cently passed by the World Assembly in its present ses- sion. Speaking before a meet- ing to -which students, professors and the general public have been invited, Mr. Thondup will describe the present political situation in his native land, land ,again appeal "the cause of freedom of the small nations of the world." Although unable to take direct part in the United Nations debates, Gyalo Thondup has long been his "brother's eyes outside Tibet." As the Lama's "unofficial ambassador to the outside world," he has spent the past ,ten years ·abroad. Various improvements will be made in Maguire before the change takes place. A new floor will be put in as well as a new ceiling. The room will then be repainted to suit its new function. Yearbook Names Flynn To Guard Staff Secrets On Wednesday, Mr. Thondup ad- dressed the United Nations in his continuing efforts to gain support for Tibet. The distinguished diplo- mat, who attended the Georgetown Institute of Languages and Lin- guistics, will also speak before the National Press Club on Friday. No str:anger to the United States, Mr. Thondup will interrupt his temporary stay in Washington to address the assembled students of Georgetown. In his own words, he "desires to exchange ideas on an intellectual level with the students of this University." When finished, the new refer- ence room will provide greater convenience and accessibility. It will also have a greater book ca- pacity than the present reference room. Randall now holds from 6000 to 7000 books while it is estimated that the reconverted Maguire will hold from 9000 to 10,000 in addi- tion to the card 'catalogues. How- ever, this increase in reference books will in time cut down on the sea-ting capacity as compared with Randall. On the other hand, Randall Reference Room will still be available serving a new func- tion-as a reserve book room. Other exp-ansion plans for -the library -are still in the process of formation. The senior class is pres- ently considering donating, as its senior gift, an audio room which would include a record and tape library. This would be housed in the present reserve book room and the two smaller adj-acent reading rooms on second He-aly. When the new science building is completed, the librrary will also take over the offices of the Physics Department in the basement of Healy. It is as yet uncertain to what use these rooms wiH be put, but it is 'a that they will be made into reading rooms. The library must of necessity constantly expand due to its yearly acquisition of new books and periodicals. It presently contains 350,000 volumes 'and is adding new books at the rate of 10,000 per year. (Continued on Page 3) ONCE-A-YEAR BOYS ..• Unlike lowly week-to-week HOYA, Ye Domesday Boeke maks big spectacular one-shot splash. Staff pic- tured here, left to right: .James Heffernan, Terry Donovan, Mike Gentlesk, Tim Murphy, Mike Capizola, .Joe Sraeel, Bob DiMaio, Bill Gildea, Dennis Flynn, Editor, Moderator Rev. E. Paul Betowski, S ..J. Rev. E. Paul Betowski, S.J-, moderator of Ye Domesday Booke, has announced the yearbook's editorial board for this, Georgetown's hundred and seventieth school year. Editor-in-Chief Dennis Fly n n comes from Davenport, Iowa, but finished high school at John Car- roll here in Washington before en- tering Georgetown in 1956. Denny is an AB English and Military Sci- ence major who is serving as Pres- ident of the Association of the United States Army and vice pres- ident of the Scabbard and Blade. Among his other extracurricular activities Denny is Co-Chairman of the Senior Class Dayhop-Boarder Relations Committee, a member of the Fall Festival Committee, and also of the varsity rifle team. This will be his second year working on the book's staff_ Mike Capizola from Minotola, New Jersey, has been elected head of the Yearbook's photography de· partment. This is Mike's fourth year on the Ye Domesday Booke (Continued on Page 8) Born in 1927 in Tsinghai Prov- idence, known 'among the Tibetan people las Andos, Gyal{) Thondup was a boy of twelve when his younger brother, then age four, was proclaimed the Dalai Lama. The Dalai Lama's family, like those of his predecessors, was of humble origin. In 1945, Mr. Thondup jour- neyed to Nanking, where he was a student until the Communist occu- pation in 1949. After a .stay in In- dia, Hang Kong, and Taiwan, he came to the United States in the fall of 1951. Early in 1952 he again returned to Lhasa, Tibet's capital, where he lived under close Com- munist surveillance. Believing his life to be in danger, Mr. Thondup escaped to India, where he remain- ed until the present crisis. Meanwhile his younger brother, the Dalai Lama, remained in Tibet, where he exercised a rapidly di- minishing sphere of influence in Tibetan political -affairs. By 1958, restrictions placed upon the Lama's government were complete; late in the preceding year, armed in- surrections broke out in his sup- port. In the 'autumn of 1958, rep- resentatives of all the tribes and geographic areas of Tibet consti- tuted themselves as a convention and suggested a program for politi- oal and social reform "within the framework of :the Buddhist re- ligion": equality of representation for all the Tibetan people was a cardinal aim of these leaders. Sub- (Continued on Page 7)

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Transcript of To Aid Grads

DR. WILLIAM T. TAYLOR
The Committee on Recom­ mendations for Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental and Science Stu­ dents has increased its size and scope. Dr. William T. Tay­ lor, PhD, Professor of Biol­ ogy and Chairman of the Com­ mittee outlined the new poUcy this week to the HOYA. He indicated the increased benefits for Gradu­ ate school candidates, and revealed the new Committee members. In addition, Dr. Taylor re-emphasized the usefulness of the Committee and expressed confidence that the past eight years of its existence have aided many graduate school hopefuls.
The policy itself, 'as stated by Dr. Taylor, is ",to expedite a man's candidacy to professional or grad­ uate school." This policy is marked by a new emphasis on evaluation from many quarters for the sci­ ence major. Each candidate must bold interviews with several mem­ bers of the Committee on separate occasions. If the case of an indi­ vidual student requires additional reviewing, the entire Committee will interview the student in ques­ tion aI.1d hear his reasons for ap­ plying to graduate school.
As indicated by the application sheet distributed to each Commit­ tee member, -a candidate is evalu­ ated by the usual criteria of grades, class standing and honors. Added to these impoI'ltant and essential qualifications are various, relative­ ly abstract evaluation aids such as; aptitude, appeal'ance, reli'ability, intensity of purpose and other simil'ar questions. The final evalu­ -ation sheet also indicates extra­ curricular activities in which the student h'as eng'aged.
The benefits are indicated by the equality of evaluation given to every candid'ate. The Honors Pro­ gram students, the BS (science) majors and the AB (science) ma­ jors receive -an equal opportunity for graduate school.
The Committee's new members include: The Rev. Arthur E. Gor­ don, S.J.; Mr. Frank A. EVlans, MA; and the Rev. John L. Ryan, S.J. The other members of the Committee include; Dr. Arthur A. Espenscheid, Dr. John W. Howley, Dr. Charles L. Beckel, -and Dr. Taylor. These men represent a body of educators which can evaluate a student on his all-around ability. Moreover, these men have dealt personally with the oandidates either in class or in various other facets of student life. Dr. Taylor believes that this Committee g,ives the student a go-al towards which he can strive. To augment the 'Committee's work the Chairman of the Committee urges the science students to learn the admission requirements of their preferred graduate school. By doing this, the Recommendations Committee can advise the student of course requirements and ways to improve their chances of admission.
Vol. XLI, No. 6 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY, WASmNGTON; D. C. Thursday, October 29, 1959
WELL STACKED ... Library worker needs home for 10,000 new volumes acquired yearly. Maguire dining hall will eventually open its doors to the needy worthies.
Maguire Provides rood ro .. Thought
by AlRoss The fate of Maguire dining hall has been decided. It
will continue to provide nourishment, but now it will be food for thought. The library plans to take over and convert it into the main reference room. It will replace the Randall Reference Room which will in time become the Reserve Book Room.
Dalai Lama's Kin To Address IRe
Gyalo Thondup, the elder brother of the Dalai Lama of Tibet, will address the International Relations Club of George­ town University tonight at 8 :00 in the Palmes Lounge. The official representative of his Holiness the Dalai Lama in the United States, Mr. Thondup has just presented the Tibetan case before the United Nations. As a result of his efforts, a
BROTHER TO GOD-KING Gyalo Thondup.
resolution censoring Com­ munist China's intervention in Tibetan affairs has been re­ cently passed by the World Assembly in its present ses­ sion. Speaking before a meet­ ing to -which students, professors and the general public have been invited, Mr. Thondup will describe the present political situation in his native land, land ,again appeal "the cause of freedom of the small nations of the world."
Although unable to take direct part in the United Nations debates, Gyalo Thondup has long been his "brother's eyes outside Tibet." As the Lama's "unofficial ambassador to the outside world," he has spent the past ,ten years ·abroad.
Various improvements will be made in Maguire before the change takes place. A new floor will be put in as well as a new ceiling. The room will then be repainted to suit its new function.
Yearbook Names Flynn To Guard Staff Secrets
On Wednesday, Mr. Thondup ad­ dressed the United Nations in his continuing efforts to gain support for Tibet. The distinguished diplo­ mat, who attended the Georgetown Institute of Languages and Lin­ guistics, will also speak before the National Press Club on Friday.
No str:anger to the United States, Mr. Thondup will interrupt his temporary stay in Washington to address the assembled students of Georgetown. In his own words, he "desires to exchange ideas on an intellectual level with the students of this University." When finished, the new refer­
ence room will provide greater convenience and accessibility. It will also have a greater book ca­ pacity than the present reference room. Randall now holds from 6000 to 7000 books while it is estimated that the reconverted Maguire will hold from 9000 to 10,000 in addi­ tion to the card 'catalogues. How­ ever, this increase in reference books will in time cut down on the sea-ting capacity as compared with Randall. On the other hand, Randall Reference Room will still be available serving a new func­ tion-as a reserve book room.
Other exp-ansion plans for -the library -are still in the process of formation. The senior class is pres­ ently considering donating, as its senior gift, an audio room which would include a record and tape library. This would be housed in the present reserve book room and the two smaller adj-acent reading rooms on second He-aly.
When the new science building is completed, the librrary will also take over the offices of the Physics Department in the basement of Healy. It is as yet uncertain to what use these rooms wiH be put, but it is 'a poss~bility that they will be made into reading rooms.
The library must of necessity constantly expand due to its yearly acquisition of new books and periodicals. It presently contains 350,000 volumes 'and is adding new books at the rate of 10,000 per year.
(Continued on Page 3)
ONCE-A-YEAR BOYS ..• Unlike lowly week-to-week HOYA, Ye Domesday Boeke maks big spectacular one-shot splash. Staff pic­ tured here, left to right: .James Heffernan, Terry Donovan, Mike Gentlesk, Tim Murphy, Mike Capizola, .Joe Sraeel, Bob DiMaio, Bill Gildea, Dennis Flynn, Editor, Moderator Rev. E. Paul Betowski, S . .J.
Rev. E. Paul Betowski, S.J-, moderator of Ye Domesday Booke, has announced the yearbook's editorial board for this, Georgetown's hundred and seventieth school year.
Editor-in-Chief Dennis Fly n n comes from Davenport, Iowa, but finished high school at John Car­ roll here in Washington before en­ tering Georgetown in 1956. Denny is an AB English and Military Sci­ ence major who is serving as Pres­ ident of the Association of the
United States Army and vice pres­ ident of the Scabbard and Blade. Among his other extracurricular activities Denny is Co-Chairman of the Senior Class Dayhop-Boarder Relations Committee, a member of the Fall Festival Committee, and also of the varsity rifle team. This will be his second year working on the book's staff_
Mike Capizola from Minotola, New Jersey, has been elected head of the Yearbook's photography de· partment. This is Mike's fourth year on the Ye Domesday Booke
(Continued on Page 8)
Born in 1927 in Tsinghai Prov­ idence, known 'among the Tibetan people las Andos, Gyal{) Thondup was a boy of twelve when his younger brother, then age four, was proclaimed the Dalai Lama. The Dalai Lama's family, like those of his predecessors, was of humble origin. In 1945, Mr. Thondup jour­ neyed to Nanking, where he was a student until the Communist occu­ pation in 1949. After a .stay in In­ dia, Hang Kong, and Taiwan, he came to the United States in the fall of 1951. Early in 1952 he again returned to Lhasa, Tibet's capital, where he lived under close Com­ munist surveillance. Believing his life to be in danger, Mr. Thondup escaped to India, where he remain­ ed until the present crisis.
Meanwhile his younger brother, the Dalai Lama, remained in Tibet, where he exercised a rapidly di­ minishing sphere of influence in Tibetan political -affairs. By 1958, restrictions placed upon the Lama's government were complete; late in the preceding year, armed in­ surrections broke out in his sup­ port. In the 'autumn of 1958, rep­ resentatives of all the tribes and geographic areas of Tibet consti­ tuted themselves as a convention and suggested a program for politi­ oal and social reform "within the framework of :the Buddhist re­ ligion": equality of representation for all the Tibetan people was a cardinal aim of these leaders. Sub-
(Continued on Page 7)
Elections Beginning with last night's nominations, the first class
elections for the Class of 1963 are now underway. Because these elections are so important to the members of the Fresh­ man Class; we would like to add our own advice to that already given by the'. President of the Yard.
Class elections are an end in themselves, but only insofar as they held all the participants to meet the individual stu­ dents within their class. It is essential that each of the candidates meet as many of the men he wishes to represent as possible. This obligation carries with it a further duty for the electorate. They must be willing to listen carefully, to question seriously, and consider objectively each of the prospective officers who present themselves to them.
Although it is perhaps unnecessary, we would add the following caution to our advice to the freshmen. In many respects, these elections will be the most important of your college career, because these men are the officers who will guide your class through its most important and difficult year at Georgetown. The character and potential which your class will fulfill during its stay at the Hilltop are, to a large extent, set during this first year.
In order to merit your vote, the successful candidate should fulfill to the highest degree possible those virtues which we like to think are possessed by all the gentlemen of Georgetown: sincerity, modesty, amiability, and openness of character. These are, of course, traditional abstractions, and it is up to each of the voters to concretize them by ap­ plying them to the individual candidates.
The men you choose for your officers should also be able to work well together. This does not mean that they have to be of the same type, or that they have to be running on a ticket. If you pick the best individual for each respec­ tive position, you will have picked the best group of officers possible.
It has become a political tradition at Georgetown to consider freshman office as a sort of political suicide, because so few of the first year officers are returned to their positions in later years. There is no reason why this need be so, though, and we are convinced that it will not be so if the· men elected are the best possible.
This should not be taken as a directive to vote for the candidate who promises the most. As we have already pointed out, freshman year is a very important and a very difficult one. It is sufficient if the officers merely organize the class and lay the foundation for future growth and achievement.
In the summary then, we would suggest that you de­ mand the best of your candidates-you deserve it! Consider the criteria we have outlined above--or any of your own­ and weigh each candidate carefully. Then be sure to vote!
Eaitor-in-Chief ...............•.........•............................ RICHARD C. KULLEN, JR. Managing Editor ............•.................................•......................... DENNIS DUFFY Business Manager ...............•......................•...........•........... ANTHONY DELUCIA News Editor ........................................................................ MICHAEL J. LEAHY Sports Eaitor .........................................................•..........•. WILLIAM J. GILDEA Feature Editor ................•.................................................•. ROBER T W. LYONS Copy Eaitor ........•.....................................•...•................. THOMAS A. KOVATS Aavertising Manager ...•......................•......•..........•................... ROBER T DIMAIO P hotography Editor .........................................................•............ BILL FARRELL Make-ttp Editor ..............•..........................•.......................... JOHN M. SNYDER Circulation Editor .•................................................................ RALPH MAZZUCA Executive Secretary ........................................................ : ..... JAMES J. CADDEN Headline Editor ..................................•..................................... KARL WESTERN Rewrite Editor ...........................................•...................................... GREG SACHS Moderator ...............•.................................................... EDW ARD I. BURNS, S.J.
Published by the students of Georgetown University every Thursday during the college year except for vacation and examination periods.
"First class postage paid at Washington, D. C." Subscription rate, $6.50 per year.
News Staff: Joe Alexandre, Martin Arbagi, Mark Baldwin, Bob Bennett, John
Consolini, Jim Delaplane, Robert Desmond, Joe Fallon, Bev Galloway, Dan Griffin, Steve Hanink, Tom Harron, John Heyes, Dave Kleiler, Ed Kravitz, Ed Leonard, Ed Masterson, John McGraw, Barry Mergardt, Joe Niederst, Art Paone, John Pierz, Pedro Rosado, Al Ross, Steve Stoll, John Walsh, Joseph Walsh Circulatio11 Staff:
Bart Christopher, 'Tim Geraci, Tom Graham, Robert Legato, Peter Sinnot. Advertising Staff:
Michael Diskin, Thomas V. Dwyer, Jim Hauser. Photo Staff:
rHE HOYA Thursday, October 29, 1959
I Round-up ] I In giving credit where credit is '--------­
Council· ·Capers· by Nicholas J. Kilmer
due, we would like to acknowledge The last meeting of the Student Council dealt with many inter­ our. debt to Mr. Robert Young of esting and important problems, few of which were either really in· the Public Relations Office· for the teresting. or very important. picture of Fr. Yates in last" week~s Mr. Giard proposed that, in view of testing and subsequent Thanks· HOYA and for the picture of Fr. giving holidays, the date for frosh class elections be changed_ There
followed a brisk little debate between Messrs. Giard and Donovan as Lucey in this issue. Mr. Young has to the relative merits of several proposed dates for Thanksgiving. given us several pictures during No definite date was established; but when one is, it will be announced. the year and we shudder to think In spite of the assistance of Mr. Murray, Mr. Giard's treasurer of the holes the HOYA might have and left.hand man, who happens to know that the frosh are very had were it not for his camera. worried about the coming quarterly tests (he happens to take a frosh
The mixer season isn't over yet. (And we thought we were kid­ ding when we said that it might last till Thanksgiving!) There will be a Halloween Hunt (that's what they call it) at Trinity this Friday, October 30, from 8 to 11:30 p.m., in Alumnae Hall. Un­ doubtedly the trick or treat sea­ son will· be an occasion for mix­ ers at other schools, but this is the only dance we were notified about.
In case you are planning to get sick in the next few weeks, you had better set your time carefully. The hours for sick call at the in­ firmary have been changed. The new schedule is as follows: Monday through Friday-lO:30 to 12:30 and 4:30 to 6:00; and Saturday-ll:00 to 12:00 noon.
In connection with schedule planning, we might also note an­ other recent innovation of benefit to the student. The entire week's menn for the cafeteria is now posted on the bulletin board out­ side the Old North SPO.
The issue of Harper's on the newsstands today carries an inter­ esting article on "Rebuilding the Foreign Service." It deals with a proposed reorganization of the State Department and neglects the pre·professional education of the foreign service officer, so George­ town does not figure in the article, though the broad background pro­ vided by the Foreign Service School seems to be just what the author, James L. McCamy, had in mind when he wrote this article.
. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
To the Editor:
I'm wondering if the casual and possibly impudent remark concern­ ing G. W. Hegel in last week's "Letters to the Editor" section really speaks well for the HOYA as a forum for discussion among students, and more particularly in this case, among prof€ssors whose views are to be met with respect from students.
It is obvious to all that a truly marvelous contribution was made to the school paper with the pub· lication of Dr. Desan's letter. Noth· ing but good could come of such a a thing, and at the time the editors seemed to stress this by encourag­ ing more of the same. It was all a serious business with attention to scholarship and proper philosophi­ cal interpretation ..
But the quip at the end of Dr. McTighe's letter last week seemed to kill, though most likeiy unin­ tentionally, the editors' previous promotion of such dialogue. And if it didn't kill, it certainly could be seen to injure such efforts and endanger the presence of future contributions from th€ faculty in the pages of the HOY A.
sllbject), the election resolution was passed as it stood. It was a bad day for Mr. Giard.
The Council members were all given ballots to vote on. The subject was not announced, but I think the Council members know. I am almost certain of this.
Policemen will be installed on the tennis courts on weekends, with the usual guns and nightsticks, to beat off all the non·Georgetown ·women and children who come to play.
Mr. Cadden announced that the IRC club was going to New York to help decide the fate of Eastern Europe. I hope they will tell us what they decide.
At about nine o'clock, Mr. Cadden leapt to the floor (doing this from a sitting position requires considerable agility) and suggested that the council extend the meeting, as it was nine o'clock and all, and the meeting can be held constitutionally for only one hour. When the motion was put to the question, Mr. McShane raised an objection, but was brutally suppressed by the chair before being allowed to voice it.
When the motion had been passed, Mr. McShane humbly asked that he be allowed to make an observation. When the request was reluctantly granted, Mr. McShane quietly pointed out that as the meeting had begun at eight fifteen, rather than the usual eight o'clock, due to the fact that the meeting was being held in alien territory (Copley Lounge was still full of Mr. Mugnaini), only forty-five minutes had elapsed, and thus the motion was hardly necessary.
It was a bad day for Mr. Giard. The meeting ended shortly.
Under The Tree by George Townely
If the prose of today's excursion-reappearing now after a gap that was admirably filled by Mr. Shulman and a score or two of his copywriting colleagues-seems at all wobbly, fragmentary, or fog­ bound, we apologize to no one. It was written last weekend during stolen moments of Shelleyan inspiration, beginning with a scribbled sentence on a cocktail napkin Friday evening and ending with a helpless little preposition Sunday night as we surrendered our bundle of unintelligible notes to the editors of this tabloid and wondered where their usually buoyant enthusiasm had disappeared to.
Among the highlights, lowlights, and no lights of the weekend's nautically flavored festivities, we shall not soon forget the events of Friday ·evening at McDonough Gymnasium. Miss Lorraine DeBoe, captured the heart of at least one male member of the audience by the traditional method of landing on his lap, as the young lady with him turned a magnificent shade of purple. Miss DeBoe was followed on the program by Phil Fort and Mimi Hines, who so vividly recreated the atmosphere of the Ed Sullivan Show that throughout the act we sat in constant .dread of a Lincoln-Mercury commercial.
Miss DeBoe, Miss Hines, and Mr. Ford, however, were not the only entertainers to visit Georgetown last week. Early-plOrning patrons of a familiar breakfast house on Wisconsin Avenue reported several days ago that among those sampling the orange juice there recently was a gentleman by the name of Frank Sinatra. Mr. Sinatra declined to perform, though we are told that he consumed his bacon and eggs in most appealing manner.
Saturday afternoon marked the first floating cocktail party ever held at Georgetown University. We don't recall anyone leaping over the side or being gobbled up by the propellers of the S.S. Mount Vernon, but even without such delightful tricks, the trip was far from tedious. Mr. Fabrizio and his crew provided a generous supply of rhythmic noises, which during an intermission was supplemented by the spirited hannony of the Dargasons-currently a poor man's version of the Kingston Trio.
The afternoon was brightened by sunshine, music, and orange blossoms, darked by a sullen thundershower, and brightened again by a rainbow, which brought sumptuous cheers when it appeared. By the time the good ship docked, its passengers were beginning to glow from the effects of some barbaric fluid labeled Club 400. As we shuffled down, the gangway, we overheard one young man who spoke mistily of the "polio match tomorrow," thus suggesting a jousting tourna­ ment between two teams of mounted paraplegics. Fortunately, how­ ever, the Georgetown polo players turned out Sunday in full posses­ sion of their faculties and were sound enough of mind and body to emerge with another victory.
With the finish of the final chukker, of course, the festival drew to an official close. As the ponies bounded off the field, announcers John Halk and Leonard Keilp folded their platform like Arabs and silently stole away. A few cheers followed Mr. Halk, who seemed during the match to be suffering from an obsession diagnosed as "Sheildsomania," and Mr_ Keilp, who had lent an Arthurian air to the proceedings with his occasional references to a "steed."
Pete Maxfield, Ron Cunningham. Copy Staff:
James E. Scanlon. Make-up Staff:
Tim Bidlfe, Mike Raoul-Duval. Cartoonist:
Peter Oliphant.
Maybe the editors again have something to say after this letter­ I hope it will be a considered opinion that shows a thoroughly thoughtful approach toward the policy of a college paper.
News of the recently completed cafeteria, described last week in these pages with ecstatic attention to detail, provided for us an oasis of hope in our desert of gastronomic despair. We are cheered, frankly, by the prospect of an oven which accommodates twenty-two pans, a toaster which disgorges thirty slices of toast per minute, and a glass wall which affords an unobstructed view of the Potomac River. We dare say, however, that the cause of Georgetown unity will be set back at least fifty years by the glass dividers, which insure that residents will not be subjected to the company of non-residents, and that the non-Jesuit faculty will be forced to traffic with neither. In a few years, we envision a seating arrangement whereby a soundproof cage sur­ rounds every table, similar in design to the language laboratory. That way, we needn't talk to anybody. Vol. XLI, No.6 Thursday, October 29, 1959
Sincerely,
The Magic Lantern by Dennis Duffy and Phili1J Quinn ' ~-----......
GU's Meisle.. UpperclClsses Begin Engages In Annual Bristo", Trek Healed Debale , Retreats, a familiar part of They Came To Cordura should by all rights be entitled They Got To
Cordtwa And Threw It Away. Imagine: a searching exploration into the nature of cowardice and courage combined with a ,rousing ad­ venture yarn; a "cowardly" major leading 'a gang of thuggish "h?ro~s" and a balky woman across a stretch of wild desert country, SaCrIfiCIng himself despite their open attempts to eliminate him; a lone figure noble enough to cherish these brutes for the heroism (which we learn was a non-rational, in some cases brutish, action) which they at one point exhibited.
As I said imagine all this, and then realize that the major will, indeed must, die if the action is to ring true. Then attempt to reconcile yourself to the extraordinary occurrence in the final three minutes of the film. It is then that the hero arises from the gravel we assumed was his grave and leads, almost races, the lot of them down the hill to home base_ Flourish of trumpets. The End.
In case you haven't heard it from a dozen other and finer film cI:itics: Hollywood can imagine only a Christ resurrected; never, never a Christ crucified.
Therefore: Robert Rossen's otherwise excellent job of directing (the foolish cavalry charge, the brilliant use of natural scenery), Gary Cooper's astonishingly competent portrayal of Major Thorne, the - equally astounding performance of Rita Hayworth, who for the first time in her career indulges in that vice we call acting, the artistry which Van Heflin exhibits in the role of a sub-man, is all more or less wasted.
Wasted also are the performances of Tab Hunter (which just goes to show that a good director can make a silk purse from a teen-ager's god), Richard Conte, and Dick York. I can only hope that Rossen was forced by studio brass to film the final minutes thus. If there were no finance-men who run our cinema the way they see fit, I should have to invent some.
Perhaps I am what one terms a purist. I do know that a golden pagoda with its pinnacle enhanced by a tin weathervane sickens me.
D.D. * * *
Karl Meister, a College sen­ ior, t h r u s t himself and Georgetown University into the thick of "international politics" and notoriety a week ago. Meister, an exchange stu­ dent from Germany with an Ade­ nauer Scholarship, represented the College at the third annual District of Columbia's Foreign Student Day on October 22. The day, sponsored by the Foreign Student Council of Greater Washington, inc Iud e d sightseeing, luncheons and discus­ sions for some 400 foreign students.
During the visits to the Corcoran Art Gallery at 10:30, Meister and an American U. exchange sopho­ more, Alfred Freschen, also from Germany, conducted an animated discussion with Russian Gennadi G. Derevenskov, a graduate student at Princeton.
The Russian opened up the ex­ change with a remark to Meister: "Why don't you Gerlllans (East and West) get together?" The topics then ranged from the Berlin situation to the Hungarian Revo­ lution, attracting much attention.
REV. WILLIAM KAIFER, S_J.
Mrs. Michelson Starts Fine Arts' Lecture Schedule
Georgetown life, are here again, with the annual three-day ,trek to St. Ann's Retreat House at Bris­ tow, Virginia, already underway for sophomores.
Each year aU Catholic students of the College 'are required to spend one weekend in retreat ex­ ercises. As in the past, upJ>t!rclass­ men, in groups of thirty or forty, are making the trip to the re­ treat house, while the freshmen remain on campus.
This year freshmen will be on retreat from January 23 to 25, immediately following the mid­ year exams. Exams have been moved ahead a day and a half for frehmen so that they will be free to le'ave campus the same day as the upperclassmen.
Four of Hollywood's latest crop of brilliant-young-stars have given the screen addict yet another glimpse of the seamy side of show biz in paramount's Career. Shirley MacLaine, Carolyn Jones, Dean Martin, and Anthony Franciosa bring their assorted talents to bear on a cliched tale of life in the theater.
The Narcissistic Industry's newest public confession is a set of variations by screenwriter James Lee on the tried and true theme of the rise of "The Great Star." The ambitious young man comes to New York from the hinterlands, determined to conquer Broadway; the hungry young talent finds himself starving in a cold-water flat while his marriage goes to pieces. Soon the disillusioned young man tries to sell his soul for star billing. But along .comes salvation, and the courageous young man has his character reforged in the furnace of war. So the mature young man decides to abandon the theater for the more lucrative prospects of employment. Of course, eventually the frustrated young artist hal? his creative fires rekindled by the under­ standing woman. At last the middle-aged young man who has suf­ fered gets "the big break" and becomes a star, basking in publ~c adulation. "Was it worth it?" asks the faithful agent. You bet It was! But then movies are better than ever.
The discussion ended when Meis· ter realized it was holding up the tour of the gallery. Later Karl Meister and the Russian exchanged addresses and planned to meet each other "not as a Russian and a Ger­ man, but as two people, as two friends."
The incident was featured in a two column article in the Washing­ ton Post of Friday, October 23.
At 4: 15 Karl was one of eight students chosen to meet briefly with Secretary of State Christian Her­ ter. They had an informal intro­ duction with the international fig­ ure, and each received his auto­ graph.
Tonight at 8 :00 p.m_ the Fine Arts Club initia~es this year's program with the first of a series of three. lectures entitled "Innovators in Paint­ ing." Mrs. Dorothea Michel­ son, formerly staff lecturer of the National Gallery of Art, will be the guest lecturer.
Father Kaifer, S.J., Student Counsellor, expl!ains that frosh re­ treats are held on campus not of choice but of necessity. Lack of a sufficient number of weekends in the school year makes it impossible to accommodate freshmen at the retreat house. Added to this is the financial problem the University encounters in supplying the dif­ ference between the $20 per-stu­ dent cost and the $10 fee regularly charged.
Sophomore retreats, which be­ gan the weekend of October 2-4, will continue through November 8. Junior and senior retreats will take place later, running through April 8.
Hoya Think ... s Bea .. QlleellS Pa-of. Tonight
Method-Man Anthony Franciosa, as the hero, runs the gamut of emotions from A to B; even when he is being victimized he seems to deserve every humiliation. Shirley Mac Laine, as the alcoholic daughter of the big producer, turns in a competent performance in an unsympathetic role, and Dean Martin, as a double-crossing schlemiel of a director, gives a mature portrayal of Dean Martin. It is Carolyn Jones, playing a frustrated actress-turned-agent, wI:o adds a dimensio.n of pathos to an otherwise stereotyped story. It IS good t9 see thIS talent escape from the role of the neurotic bohemian, the possibilities of which her performance in Bachelor Party nearly exhausted.
Although there are effective scenes sprinkled intermittently throughout the film, the script, in general, seems to suffer from a disease which might easily be diagnosed as diarrhea of the dialogue. Since Hollywood has not yet mastered the simple art of telling a story with a message without being painfully explicit about that message several times in the course of the film, the audience is treated t~ lengthy ~is­ courses of moral milk-toast concerning the virtues of creatIve dramatICS and the vileness of those who conspire against true talent, as if the obtrusive use of black and white photography were insufficient to announce that Career is a "serious, low-budget film."
It would be delightfully unconventional to see a serious, high­ budget, technicolor film which restrained from moralizing, but one must be an idealist to expect such a miracle from Hollywood more than once in a decade. After all, the taboos of the film industry are as rigid as those of, the Hindu. Career, by adhering to the Hollywood rules from beginning to end, fails as a dramatic work, and it is small consolation to note that it might have been great if only ...
* * * P.Q. N ow that we have finished with the distress bulletins, allow me to
announce that The Mouse That Roared is a howler. Scade of humorous cinematic touches have served to heighten the
delightful satire offered by the book. For these, director J a~k Arnold gets credit. (Once for all: as far as I am concerned, the dIrector of a film is like the captain on the bridge. No matter What happens, good or bad, it comes as a result of his actions.)
Peter Sellers is a fine comedian who does a creditable job with three roles, one of them female, but he is no Guiness, nor is he a Sim. Nevertheless, the bubbly plot and Arnold's bits of business could carry along even Walter Winchell in the lead role.
Too many English comedies have a tendency to become either gloppily sentimental or strainedly satirical. Such is not the case here_
The Mouse That Roared will not replace The Lavender Hill Mob or A Night At The Opera, but I still wouldn't let this little gem slip by if I were you.
Food For Thought The yearly ,allotment for books
.is apprOXimately $62,500. About $42,000 of this 'amount is spent on new books and periodicals. The remainder is used for m'aintenance and repair of present book stocks. The selection of new books is the responsibility of a committee of
D.D.
facuLty members and heads of the various departments .
Each department is appropriated a portiQn of the new book budget according to its size, resources and relative importance. Information on newly purc'hased books is displayed on the library bulletin boards on first and second Healy.
Others representing Georgetown U. were Miss Marlene Chaglassian of the Institute, Mr. B. Scheyven of the College and two graduate students, Mr. Baehr and Toni Ayeila.
GU Food Service Debate's Decision Referred To Adm.
"The Food Situation At Georgetown" was the subject of a recent debate held under the co-sponsorship of the Stu­ dent Council and the Philo­ demic.
The affirmative's main point was thaJt the new cafeteria, with all its improvements and innovations, would allow preparation of more palatable food. F if tee n specific improvements in the new cafe-
Mrs. Michelson has a varied and distinguished background. She re­ ceived her AB 'and MA and did work for her PhD at the Univer­ sity of London. Besides this, Mrs. Michelson has held the Carnegie Fellowship, the Dutch Government Fellowship, the Belgian-American Foundation Fellowship, 'and in 1957 was a fellow in research at the Corning Museum of Glass, Corn­ ing, New York. Currently she is teaching painting and sculpture at Georgetown Visitation and do­ ing free lance lecturing.
The lectures will feature three successive subjects: "The Italian Renaissance," "American Art," and "The Modern Movement." Each lecture will be illustrated by fifty slides chosen by Mrs. Michelson from the National Gallery. Mrs. Michelson will treat the classic style of each period and then dem­ onstrate the innovations rflhat led to a new period. Of particular in­ terest will be the relationship and influence of each period on ,follow­ ing periods.
All lectures will be held in the Hall, of Nations. Subsequent lec­ tures in the series will be on No­ vember 5 and 12. All are invited­ admission 50 cents for non-mem­ bers; faculty free.
teria were listed. h PI The negative took a "wait and Deutsc men an
see" attitude on the improvements Year's Songfests and then contended that any com- pulsory food service program was A I . . 1M· objectionable. Their contention was t nltla eetlng that if the food were good it would Der Deutsche Verein, the College compete favorably with the local German Club, held its first meeting restaurants on its own.
of the year on Monday, October Instead of the usual rebuttal, 19, in the Student Activities Room,
there was an open discussion in with a record turnout of fifty mem­ which the audience participated. bers. Most of the replies could be classi- The meeting was conducted in fied under two headings, the first German by the President, junior of which was a list of deficiencies John C. Warman, an AB (classical) in the current food facilities. The Honors philosophy major from second was a 'strong request that Washington, D. C. Plans for the aotion be taken to improve the year were discussed and a film on food quality now! the life of German composer Rich-
The results of the debate were' ard Wagner was shown, along with compiled and given to Fathers a German newsreel. Included in the RYlan 'and Sellinger, who are now Club's agenda for the coming year considering them. are a Christmas party and a Bier-
The debaters were Dick Kullen, fest at the end of the year, featur­ Gabe K'ajeckas, James McShane, ing traditional German Gemuet­ and John Wedgeworth, all seniors. lichkeit. Co-chairmen were George Giard, Meetings will be held every week President of the Yard, and Dave this year under the direction of Dr. Roxe, President of the Philodemic. Anton Lang, the faculty moderator.
On Thursday, October 29 at 8 :00 p.m., the Philosophy Club will sponsor its first lec­ ture of the year in Copley Lounge. The, speaker will be Dr. John McDermott, profes­ sor of philosophy at Queens College in New York. The title of his talk will be ''The Dimension of Ex­ perience in American Philosophy." Immediately following the lecture, there will be refreshments and a discussion in which the partici­ pation of the 'audience will be most welcome.
Dr. McDermott is a graduate of Fordham University, where he was awarded his PhD in philosophy. While studying at Fordham he specialized in American philosophy and was a student of Professor Robert Polloch.
This will be the first in a series of lectures to be presented by the Philosophy Club this year. The Club, now in its second year, is moderated by Dr. Thomas McTighe, Chairman of the Philosophy De­ partment, and is directed by the triumvirate of John Wedgeworth, a senior in the Honors Program, and Thomas Anderson and William Gargaro, members of the junior class and also in the Honors Pro­ gram.
Future plans of the club include a joint lecture to be presented with ,the combined efforts of the Philosophy Club and the science clubs. This lecture, to be given by both Dr. MCTighe and Dr. Farre, the newest member of our Philosophy Department. will be on "The Philosophy of Science." Also in planning at present is a lecture to be given sometime on November by Dr. Robert Jordan of the University of New Hamp­ shire.
In addition to the lectures, a symposium is being tentatively con­ sidered. This would be run by the students themselves and it would be a defense of the philosophical positions of particular philoso­ phers. Finally, the club plans to publish a journal in the not too distant future which will contain a complete account of the four outstanding lectures of l'ast year.
Page Four' rHE 'l'C'HO"'A ,:' " ' , ... ~, Thursday, Q'itob,er, 29, ,1959
, \' "
30-31, the Georgetown Uriiversity Law Center will make a significant contribution to the recently passed Labor Bill.
, In full cooperation with the Red Cross, the University Medical Center feels it is nec­ essary to ask students of the University to help them meet the need for blood. Dr. Charles A. Hufnagel has initiated and per­ fected the open-heart surgical operation at Georgetown Medical Center. He has performed this operation on persons from all over the world. For such an operotion tremendous qU!antities of blood are needed, som~times as much as twenty to thirty pints. This need is often difficult to supply, and the Red Cross heartily endorses any procedure in which their burden is lightened. Many times they do not have the requisite amount of SQ­
called "whole blood'! which is needed within twenty four hours of the operation.
Therefore the request made of Georgetown students is as follows: When a student enrolls himself as a volunteer for the blood drive he may then be called upon to give one or two pints of blood per year. ]f he is under the age of twenty-one he is obliged to obtain 'a permission slip from his parent or guardian. Once he has registered he will wait for an appointment to have his blood typed. Then the student will be on can to give his blood on a day determined by the Red Cross but which the student will be notified of a week in advance. The Red Cross will provide tronsportation if necessary and will perform the drawing 'of ,blood. Volunteer oards for this Blood Drive may be ob­ tained from any of the SPO of­ fices on campus. It is emphasized that this is not limited to the students of the College but is open to all schools of the University.
Direoting the Blood Drive at Georgetown this year will be Fr.
Thomas Jones" S.J., and Bob Du­ fort. Father Jones is assistant pro­ fessor of theology and head of the Copley SPO. Bob is a BS biology senior and a graduate of St. Jo­ seph's High School in Buffalo, New York.
Such a simple procedure from generous donors will be instrumen­ tal in allowing more operations to be performed ,and give people a greater span of life.
The Red Cross is anxiously awaiting the outcome, even though it m'ay affect their own yearly drive here. The Red Cross will give the same credit to individuals do­ nating to the University Blood Drives as to those who donate to the Red Cross directly.
Ala.oi Bono .. r ... Lacey At 3an. Banquet
New South Dining Hall will be the site on J'anuary 28 of a testi­ monial dinner sponsored by the Georgetown Alumni Association for Fr. William S. Lucey, S.J., for thirty years of distinguished serv­ ice to the University.
This occasion, whose primary purpose is to honor Fr. Lucey, also marks the first formal dinner in the new dining hall. The main room has a seating capacity of 1500 persons.
FaJther Lucey spent his novitiate at Croton-on-Hudson, and later re­ ceived AB and MA degrees in philosophy from Loyola of Chica­ go. He was ordained here at Dahl­ gren Chapel. After teaching brief­ ly at Loyola of Baltimore, he moved to Georgetown where he began lecturing in theology and ecology. In 1929 he 'assumed the position of Regent of the Georgetown Law School, in which capacity he has
(Continued on Page 6)
by J. E. Sickler III
The retirement of George­ town's first female employee will commence tomorrow. Mrs. M. A. Keating, chief op­ erator of the switchboard in Ryan Administration Build­ ing, has completed twenty-one years of service with the Univer­ sity.
Mrs. Keating recollects that at the time of her employment in 1938, there was but one switch­ board to handle all the oalls for the University. Since then two more have been ,added. On her off hours, the board was tended by students who were helping to pay part of their college expenses.
Since those days, she believes that the University has just about tripled in students, faculty, and buildings. She noted, however, that these changes took place over a rel'atively long period of time; the most abrupt alteration occurred in the police force, whose number swelled from three to fifty-five in one year.
The incident which most stood out in Mrs. Keating's mind was the
KCDLANSWER
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KCI>L KROSS~ORD No.6 ACROSS
1. Straw hat for yacht wear?
7. Jack and his non-dieting wife
13. All 14. Come down for'
a Kool? 15. That which is
retained 16. To smoke (a
Kool) in Italy 17. Bemused bird 18. Indians who
sound weird 20. Place-kick tool 21. Start a
tangerine 23. Small ensign 24. Ring, not for
engagement purposes
27. What too much water does
28. Motorcycle appendage
33. What Kools do all day long
37. Heroine's boy friend, Leander's girl friend
38. Fill up with eats 39. Eggy prefix 41. Kind of Sack 42. This has
Menthol Magic 44. Making like
a monkey 46. Miss Fitz 47. Song, or a part 48. Inebriate 49. French pops
DOWN 1. French head
covers 2. Kind of band 3. Make
hannonious 4. Old school.- 5. Bird of the sea 6. Flat tire's
reincarnation 7. They're for
your protection 8. A little extra 9. This is edgy
10. Got all your marbles?
11. When your __ tells you, switch to Kools
12. Hardens 19. Kind of
collegiate 22. Plaster of Paris 24. Sounds of
happy cats 26. Start to rise 27. British fly-boys 29. Chemical Engi­
neer (abbr.) 30. Talented
32. Bird from Baltimore
34. Opposite of harder
36. Equivocal foliage
43. It has a long arm
45. It's easy and edible
13
15
17
21
25
37
39
42
46
48
Wheh you ... thtoat tells ) you it's time Tot" a change,
you need a teal change ...
YOU NEED THE
10 11 12
AT HER POST ••• Mrs. M. A. Keating shown at switchboard on last day_ In background, .Jimmy Cloherty_
fire that occurred in the Mulledy building in 1947. She said that during the fire almost every piece of fire-fighting apparatus in the vicinity was brought into play. The blaze was only extinguished after it had devastated the top three floors of the building.
Mrs. Keating has only two defi­ nite plans for her retirement. She would like to take a good rest, and then she would like to spend a part of her time visiting the sick. To Mrs. Keating go the fondest wishes from 'the University and her many friends.
All wool sweater imported direct from the Shetland isles, with correct crew neck and full fashioned. A time honored favorite.
N'ot sketched: other styled sweaters including cardi­ gans, boatnecks.
From $12.95
The University-sponsored Insti­ tute on the new Labor Bill will be held on these days at the Wil­ lard Hotel. It, is open to lawyers and labor management officials.
Mr_ Frank J. Dugan, Dean of Georgetown's Graduate School of Law, and numerous other notables of, law and labor' will take an ac­ tive part in the institute.
The subj ects to be discussed range from The Fiduciary Stand­ ards to The Responsibilities of Union' Officers under the new bill. Second,ary Boycotts, Constitutional Questions, Federal and State Juris­ tion, Rights, Duties and Responsi­ bilities will also be topics for dis­ cussion.
See Russia in 1960
Economy Student/Teacher summer tours, American conducted, from $495. • Russia by Motorcoach. 17·days from Warsaw or Helsinki. Visit rural towns plus major cities. • Diamond Grand Tour. Russia. Poland, Czechoslovakia, Scandinavia, Western Europe highlights. • Collegiate Circle. Black Sea Cruise, Russia, Poland, Czechoslo­ vakia, Scandinavia, Benelux, W. Europe. • Eastern Europe Adventure. First time available. Bulgaria, Roumania. Russia, Poland, Czechoslovakia, West­ ern Europe scenic route. • See your Travel Agent or write
Maupintour")k ·1603 16th St., N.W., WashingtolJ. D.C.
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Sport coats in traditional good taste. Distinctive as­ sortment of shades and pat­ terns. Crafted with natural shoulders. _:
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Dedicated to Traditional Clothing at a Favorable Cost
./
Panhandler Cons $20.35 Georgetown was panhan­
dled last Thursday. A middle­ aged (45-50), graying Negro of medium build and possessed of a glib, if slightly befuddled, tongue, bummed $20.35 from various folk connected with the university.
Bearing a uniform tale involving a broken-down auto and divers tragedies, cloassical and otherwise, the alcoholish, windbreaker-attired figure offered to pledge his _ "gold watch and ring" ,as collateral to every potential creditor. Shrewdly estimating that his offer would go untaken, he cleared a good-enough haul for someone neither lame nor halt.
As far as can be determined, his schedule can be reconstructed as follows:
1:15 p.m.-Enters White-Grave-
nor basement. Attempt at Book­ store repulsed; given bum's rush upon approaching Marty Gallagher for a touch. Leaves to seek greener pastures.
1:25-Finds them. Unidentified frosh heeds bum's request for priest and leads him to the Ad­ missions Office to find Father Mof­ fit. Father out to lunch, Mr. Frank Mann also, but Mrs. Helen Kelly, office manager, generously grants him $3. He leaves behind an illeg­ ible IOU signed "James Black."
1:30-Hits Dean's Office. Jack­ pot. Father Sellinger and remain­ der of office staff having left Miss Carol Ryan alone, she hands over $7 from the petty cash fund to his ominous wheedlings.
1:45-By this time, has made it to the second floor of Copley and is still going strong. Due to pres­ ence of maid, door of room 207 is open. Moocher accosts HOYA
THE SHIRT THAT LOVES TO TRAVEL
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--ARROW--- Each Saturday see the NCAA football "Game of the
Week-NBC TV-sponsored by ARROW.
Managing Editor Dennis Duffy, oc­ cupant of room, and receives $.35 and sceptical look.
2:30-Campus and metropolitan police open dragnet; as yet, it hasn't closed on anything.
Throughout the affair, the pan was handled quite dexterously. For example, names of leading figures to touch were quickly picked up (Frs. Moffitt and Sellinger); Mr. Mann's name was employed in soliciting funds from Miss Ryan (which accounts for their coming from petty cash). Also in evidence was his frequent employment of the figure $.96 (i.e. "I need $3.96, $7.96, etc.), to lend an air of verisi­ militude to pleas, and his glib, if somewhat drunken, tale of 32 years service with GU.
As a waggish Hoya was heard to remark, "He could have talked St. Martin out of his whole cloak."
(Continued on Page 6)
Have a real cigarette-have a CAM EL
The best tobacco makes the best smoke! R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co .• 'Vlnston-Salem, N. C.
Page Five
Liz ~ Yul To Fill Hoyarama Screen In Senior Movies-
Celebrated stars of the sil- ver screen have once again returned to Gaston Hall. There they hold forth on selected Sunday evenings throughout the year in the leading roles of the senior movies.
This year's schedule features such names as James Stewart, Yul Brynner and James Dean starring in popular films such as The Glenn Miller Story, The Brothers Kara­ mazov, and Rebel Without a Cause.
The main problem in previous years, the quality of the sound re­ production, is being corrected this year_
Credit for improving the quality of the presentation of this year's productions goes to Jack Bruder­ man and his senior movie commit-
tee. Jack is an AB economics ma­ jor from Roslyn Heights, Long Is­ land. He attended St. Mary's High School at Manhasset, Long Island. Here at Georgetown Jack is in the Honors Program· and is a member of the engineering staff of WGTB. Other members of the committee include Jim Hoehn, publicity di­ rector; Mike Brucciani, projection­ ist; Bill Benjes, Bob Daley, Bob Dufort, Jim Heffernan, John Kee­ nan, Len Keilp, Dennis Little, Dick Lynch, Bill McDevitt, Al Rees, Charlie Ryan, Joe Sraeel, Pete Tanous, and Terry Tumulty.
Quo Vadis and The Wild One, originally planned to be included in the senior movie presentations, have been scheduled for re-release by their producers and are no longer available to the committee_ Two films of equally high quality will be substituted.
SENIOR MOVIE SCHEDULE Nov. 1- CITIZEN KANE
Nov. 8- REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE
Nov. 22- BATTLE CRY
Feb. 7- THE LAVENDER HILL MOB
Mar. 6- AN AMERICAN IN PARIS
Mar. 20- SIGN OF THE PAGAN
Apr. 3- HIGH SOCIETY
May 15- EAST OF EDEN
Show Time: 7 P.M. Gaston Hall
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Fr. Lucy (Continued from Page 4)
Rev. Francis .T. Lucey, S • .I.
served since. Because of Fr. Lucey's eminent reputation, it is expected that the dinner will 'attract many prominent Washingtonians.
Panhandler (Continued from Page 5)
Sequel Friday afternoon-Return of the
Panhandler. Dr. Taylor, Biology Department C h air man, loans "J ames Black" a ten-dollar bill to get changed in order that he may give him a smaller sum.
Black last seen boardiing a bus, realizing that the driver will refuse to change $10, and approaching metropolitan policeman for $.20 fare. Receives it, boards bus, dis­ appears.
Possible third title in the Pan­ handler series: The Panhandler Goes West.
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'J'HE 'HOYA Thursday, October 29, 1959
Bird's· E'YeSurve'Ys~05 GU
This is a real bird's eye view, as 1905 was a bit too early for air­ Illane shots. We call to your attention: The massive, nay outsize, scale on which Healy Building is drawn. It is as wide as the Potomac.
Note also the absence of 36th St., the immense lake where now the Nursing School stands, and many other items.
At last! A breakfast drink you can keep
. In your room
More vitamin C than orange juice. New instant TANG is the breakfast drink you can keep right on your bookshelf-because TANG keeps any­ where without refrigeration.
Make as much as you want, whenever you want. Just mix with plain cold water-nothing to squeeze, nothing to unfreeze.
Drink TANG every morning and get more vitamin C than orange or grapefruit juice gives you. Plus vitamin A. Tastes real good, too.
Today's aSSignment: get TANG!
NEW! INSTANT! Just mix with cold water
A product of General Foods Kitchens
WANTED: Situations and gag lines for our two campus characters (above). Must relate to TANG. Will pay $25 for every entry used.
Address: TANG College Contest, Dept. GRM, Post Division, Battle Creek, Michigan. (Entries must be postmarked before Dec. 15, 1959.)
Thursday,··October 29; .1959
Dalai' La'ma's· Brother (Continued from Page 1)
sequent approval of these pI;ans was 1950 by Chinese' armies was an' made I'ate in March of this year by internationai wrong." In an appeal the D'alai· Lama hi~elf, then a to "all peace-loving nations of the fugitive from the Chinese govern- world to come to our rescue," he ment of his nation. insisted that "the people ·of Tibet
Upon his arriV'al in the United have suffered 'and are stHI suffer­ States, Thondup spoke. of "the. iog untold misery. Our only hope," tragic situation in Tibet," and he continued, "lives with you, men stated that the "violation of the and women, of the peace-loving na­ territori:al integrity of Tibet in tions of the world."
(Author oJ "1 Was a Teen-age Dwarf" "The 1vIany Loves oj Dobie Gillis", etc.)
DIARY OF A COED
MONDAY: Prof. Pomfritt sprang quiz in English lit this morning. If Shakespeare didn't write Canterbury Tales I'm a dead duck ... Lunch at the house-turkey hash. Question: how can we have turkey hash when we never had turkey? ... Smoked a Marlboro after lunch. I dig those better makin's the most! '. . . Played bridge with sorors in afternoon. When game was over, my partner stabbed me several times with hatpin. Must learn weak club bid ... Dinner at house-lamb hash. Question: how can we have lamb hash when we never had Iamb? ... Smoked a Marlboro after dinner. What filter! What flavor! What pack or box! ... Chapter meeting at night. Motion made to abolish capital punishment for pledges. Motion de­ feated ... Smoked more Marlboros. QueUe joie! ... And so to bed.
TUESDAY: Faculty tea at the house. Spilled pot of oolong on Dean of Women. She very surly. Offered her a Marlboro .
. Still surly. Offered skin graft. No help ... Dinner at Kozy Kampus Kafe-24 hamburgers. But no dessert. Have to watch waistline ... And so to bed.
WEDNESDAY: Got our marks in English lit quiz. Lucky for me Shakespeare wrote Canterbury Tales! ... Afternoon date with Ralph Feldspar. Purely platonic, Ralph wanted to con­ sult me about love trouble he's having with his girl Nymphet Calloway. I assured him things would get better. Ralph said he certainly hopes so because last four times he called on Nymphet, she dumped vacuum cleaner bag on him ... Smoked several. Marlboros. Wonderful cigarette. No confusion about which end to light. Saves loads of time ... Dinner at house­ bread. That's all; just bread ... And so to bed.
.' , ~-!,~;:,;~~ ' .• " • (
•.. j' fl~! Oil r/ Pattillo' ~1I!t OJ tf;/l t(/ffld'/! tfttfiRI WI!!1!
FRIDAY: Got our marks in American history quiz. Was shattered to learn that Millard Fillmore did not invent cotton gin. He wrote CanterbuT'ld Tales ... How very odd! ... Lunch at the house-bread hash ... Marlboro after lunch. Great smoke. Must send valentine to manufacturers ... Spent entire after­ noon getting dressed for date tonight with Norman Twonkey. Norman is dall, dark, loaded-a perfect doll! Only thing wrong is he never tells a girl where he's going to take her. So I put on a bathing suit, on top of that an evening gown, and on top of that a snowsuit. Thus I was ready for a splash party, a dance, or a toboggan slide ... So what do you think bappened? He entered me in a steeplechase, that's what! ... Would have taken first prize easily if I hadn't pulled up lame in the last furlong . . . And so to bed. @ 1959 Max Shulman
* * * Yes, the college life is a busy one and you may be having
trouble choosing the cigarette that's right for you. Here's a handy guide: For filter plus flavor-Marlboro. For flavor without filter-Philip Morris. For filter plus flavor plus cool­ ness-Alpine • •• All made by the sponsors of this column.
Page. Seven
~ •
AD~ERS!
ADlERS, IN WHITE AND COLORS, FOR MEN AND WOMEN, AVAILABLE AT
Page Eight
Yearbook (Continued from Page 1)
including his serving as assistant photography editor in his junior year .. ' An AB English major, he graduated from Vineland High School in New Jersey but has mar­ ried since and presently resides in Washington. In addition, Mike has a position on Georgetown's Student Advocate Board.
Elected Co-Sports Editors for this year are seniors Bill Gildea and Tim Murphy. Bill is an AB history and Military Science ma­ jor and a graduate of Calvert Hall High School i,n Baltimore. Besides being on the Yearbook staff for the last two years he is also an an­ nouncer on WGTB, the HOYA's Sports Editor, a member of the Scabbard and Blade, and an intra­ mural basketball enthusiast.
Working with Bill in this de­ partment is Tim Murphy, an AB (classical) English and Air Sci­ ence major. Tim's home town is Milton, Massachusetts, and he at­ tended Boston College High in the same state. In addition to being on the Ye Domesday Booke's staff this year 'he is News and Sports Di­ rector of WGTB and writes for the HOYA in the latter capacity_ Tim is also a member of the Arn­ old Air Society and Dowd Rifles and plays intramural football_ Tim and Bill Gildea will also serve as editors of the HOYA's Basketball Yearbook.
Senior class editor is Bob Di­ Maio of Providence, Rhode Island_ A graduate of Classical High School in the state's capital, Bob is here as an AB History and Mili­ tary Science major_ He is the man­ ager of the HOYA's Advertising Department and has served on its staff for the last four years. Dur­ ing the time of his studies here at Georgetown WGTB has broadcast­ ed his familiar disc jockey show_ Bob's first position on the Yearbook was as last year's business man­ ager. He lias also played intra­ mural sports for three years and is a member of the Scabbard and Blade.
Captions 'will be provided by
L'IlBOS •
Submarines ITALIAN, KOSHER AND
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rHE·HO~A Thursday, October 29, 1959
Jim Heffernan, an AB (classical) philosophy major in the Honors Course. Jim's home town is also Milton, Massachusetts, and he at­ tended Boston College High in the Bay State. He is a member of the Glee Club, and the Mask and Bauble and the Philodemic share in his oratorical talents. This will be his first year on the Yearbook but Jim also writes for the HOYA and the Journal.
Terry Donovan, an AB (classi­ cal) biology major from Win­ chester, Massachusetts, will serve as the Engraving Editor and he is the third Boston College High graduate on the staff. This is Terry's first year on the book but he is also manager of the varsity basketball team and Senior Class Secretary. In addition, he is chair­ man of the publicity committee of th~ Collegiate Club and a member of the Calliope and the Medical Science Club.
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WITH BILL GILDEA Sports E.d..itor
Game by Norman Smith
Thirty-four days before Mount St. Mary's. invades for the '59-'GO basketball curtain raiser in McDonough Gym, Tom Nolan already has his fourteen' man squad through nearlY. two weeks of drill. And 'well might the George­ town mentor be preparing so earnestly for there is nary a weak spot to be found on the twenty-four game slate
Scoring their second shut­ out victory in as many starts, the freshman football team downed the sophomores 8-0 l::tst Friday. The frosh dis­ played a rugged defense, hold­ ing the sophomores to only 67 yards passing and rushing, but were un­ able to score until late in the last quarter despite repeated threats.
which commences December 2. 6'6" senior, Tom Sanders, and 6'4" junior, Al Barden will be
leading a powerful N.Y.U. team to Georgetown for the second game of the season. Coach Loe Rossina has six of eight lettermen back from the club he piloted intO' the National Invitational TDurnament a year ago when the ViDlets beat Providence to capture third place in the Garden series.
The ball exchanged hands three times close to midfield in the first quarter before the f res h men mounted a drive from their 24 to the soph 12. There a fourth down pass failed ,and again neither team came close during the firSit half.
After whipping American University seventeen times in a rDW prior to last season, the Hoyas were crushed in a 30 point loss that they haven't forgotten. 5'10" Willie .Tones, lithe senior backcourtman, stole the show a year ago at the Fort Myer Gym and he will again make the Eagles one of the best small college quints in the East.
Bill Smith, who bagged 26 against the Hoyas fDr St. Peter's last year;- including all six Peacock points in an overtime and Chuck Ross, whO' poured in 43 at Lafayette both will be seen for the first time at Mc:Donough.
Frosh Drive The freshmen started the second
half by driving deep into enemy territory. This time the drive was halted by a pass interception on the four yard line.
Catholic All-American, JQohn Egan, plus the nucleus of last year's N.I.T. Providence College squad will be one of the toughest Dpponents should GeDrgetown draw them in the Providence Invitational during the ChristlIlas vacation.
5'10" Chuck Chevalier makes Boston College tick while Jay Metzler, NavY'S all-tilIle big man at 6'6",-is the Hoyas chief problem when the Tars come here for the first time in three years.
Niagara has a pair of high scor­ ing juniors, Tom Jones, one of the nation's premier rebounders with a 20 point plus scoring average, and Al Butler to' thwart the Hoyas.
PREST SEYMOUR Big Al Bunge and Charlie Mc­ Neil are still at Maryland to make matters pleasant for Terp coach Bud Millikan and the College Park fans, while Howie Bash is the man to watch at GeQorge Washington.
These players are just some of the reasQons why the Georgetown schedule is equal to that of last year's and will provide the Hoyas with one of the best slates against Easter competition.
* * * Tomorrow afternoon's freshman-junior intramural football con-
test could turn out to be Qone of the best 1M games in several seasons. Both squads have a good deal Df polish considering the lack of practice time duirng the week.
The frosh have yet to be scored upon while racking up wins against the seniors and sophDmores. The juniors stopped the sophs, 22-6, in their O'nly game to date.
Both clubs have good backfield personnel. The underclassmen sport quarterback, John McMillan, a fine thrower, and runners Paul Ciatti and Mike Piron. The juniors can counter with a backfield of Tom Dwyer, Bill Prest, Bill Gates, and Bat Seymour.
In the junior line there's GeQorge Renner and .Tack Fields who, on defense, spend a good deal of time in the opponent's backfield and lend good blDCking and able pass protection on the attack.
Particularly impressive has been the play of Hank Murphy at end for the frosh.
So by 6 p.m. tomorrow evening we should have a better idea just who may eventually capture the 1M crown.
Harvard Next
Hoya Polo Team 9-3 Victor Over Yale
by Bob Pruner The Georgetown Polo Club
built up a commanding lead in the second chukker and went on to down the Yale Bulldogs, 9-3 last Sunday at Woodlawn Plantations.
quick goals. Rizo-Patron scored again late in the third chukker, giving the Hoyas a 5~1 halftime lead.
Raoul-Duval took 'a beautiful pass from Rizo-Patron :for George­ town's sixth tally in the fourth chukker. Later in the same period Rizo-Patron made it 7-1.
Vincent Tallies
The sophomores, unable to move, punted on the fourth down. The soph defense, aided by a penalty, .again contained the frosh attack.
After rolling up one first down, the sopholIlores punted to the 50 'and Bill Mattimore returned to the 23. On second down, quarter­ back John McMillan passed to A. J. Voght in the end zone. Mike
Virginia Sat.
'Hounds Top Kickers~ 1-0
After eight-eight minutes of grueling, hard-fought play, two exhausted teams walked off the lower field toward the shower rooms in McDonough Gym. Both teams had given their all and from a spectator's point of view, the combatants were evenly matched. But the Loyola Greyhound center forward, Jim Kennedy, booted home 'a penalty kick that proved to be the margin of victory.
Good Hoya Defense The gl'ay-shirted Hoyas stood out
on defense but could not coor­ dinate a successful scoring drive. Right Wing Kevin McGrath pro­ vided several offensive thrills as he eluded Loyola defenders several tilIles, only to have his shots either go astray or be blocked by the visitors' goaltender. Hoya net minder Washington Monge and fullbacks Carlos RizO-Patron and Steve McDonald thwarted numer­ ous attacks by Loyola and on sev­ e~al occasions took the iniative to lead the. GU attack into Gray­ hound territory.
The game was played evenly except in the fourth quarter when Georgetown' completely dominated play but .this was to no avail as the: Loyoia goal was untouched. A Fall Festival crowd of 799
cheered the Hoyas as they out­ played Ivy League opposition for the second week in a row. Penn bowed 12-3 previDu·sly.
The first chukker saw the score tied 1-1. Mike Raoul-Duval scored in the first minute for the Hoyas and it stood until Javett Vincent
The Hoyas ·offense slowed slight­ ly in the fifth as Vincent scored Yale's second and third goals but they were matched by alternate Rick Otto's single tally and a final chukker goal by Raoul-Duval, his fourth of the ,afternoon.
In the last few minutes of the game Coach Steve Benedek, in order to gain more - scoring power in the forward line,' switched Rizo­ Patron and Monge to offensive positions.
, of Y.ale tied it in the final seconds on a penalty shot.
Hoyas Roll Georgetown got its offense in
high gear in the second chucker, outs coring the Bulldogs, 3-0. Jerry Shields scored the first goal with a long shot on an open goal and Raoul-Duv,al and Carlos Rizo­ Patron foIlcnved up with a pair of
Captain Shields played one of his finest games Df the season, particularly on defense. Besides scoring one goal, he personally thwarted four Yale scoring efforts, turning twO' of them into George­ town tallies.
The Hoyas continue against IvY League opposition when they play Harvard next Saturday at Wood­ lawn. Game time is 3 p.m.
On Wednesday the Hoya boaters travel across town to play the na­ tionally ranked and power-laden Howard pitchlIlen. Saturday will find the UniverSity of Virgini,a vs. Georgetown on the lower field at 2 p.m.
In a game preceding the Loyola match, Jim Daly's frosh soccer team defeated Wakefield High by a 2-0 score.
Piron added 2 pOints on a run. Frosh _______ 0 0 0 8 8 Sophs ______ 0 0 0 0 0 Scoring: Frosh, Touchdowns: Voght (23 yd. pass); Extra Points: Piron (run).
STATISTICS Fresh.
9 First downs rushing 1 First downs passing 2 FirSit downs penalty
132 Yards gained rushing 57 Yards g,ained passing 28 Yards penalized
Soph. 4 o 1
46 Number scrimlIlage plays
42 25 37 37
o Number punts o Yardage punting o Average distance 2 Fumbles 1 Fumbles lost
11 Passes attempted 5 Passes completed 1 Passes intercepted by
Football Standings
W L 2 0 1 0 1 1 o 3
Scoring:
6 20 6 36
Preview A clash of two intramural
football titans occurs tomor­ row afternoon on Kehoe Field when the juniors. take on the freshmen. The upperclassmen will be going after their eighth straight victory. They haven't been beaten since the Class of '59 turn­ ed the trick, 12-8, in the opening game of last season.
The frosh have yet to be scored upon in their initial two encounters at Georgetown. They blanked the seniors, 20-0, and the sophs, 8-0. The juniors are 1-0, having a 22-6 win over the sophs.
Athlete of Week Vinton - Verdisco
For the second ·consceutive week, the victory Twins, Bob Vinton and George Verdisco, shared the athlete of the week honors. Also in the
Piron, frosh ________________ _ Voght, frosh _______________ _ DiMare, sen. _______________ _
14 competition were 1M football play- 12 ers Tom Boggs and Jim Schwab,
6 bDth sophs, and frosh, Mike Piron. Dwyer, jun. ________________ _ Seymour, jun. ___________ ~ __ _ Fenlon, sophs. ______________ _ Prest, jun. _________________ _ Mattimore, frosh ______ :... ____ _
6 Vinton and Verdisco repeated 6 their tie for first place in last 6 year's cross-country run against 4 St. Joseph's last Saturday on the 2 Georgetown course.
PIPE & DRUM
Corner of 34th & M Streets, N. W.
~rnrgrtnlUu QIarry (1)ut HOT
Hamburger-1/4 lb ....... , . .40 Italian Meat Ball ............ .55 Kosher Corned Beef .. ,_ .65 Romanian Pastrami ,."., .65 Steak Sandwich, F. F.
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MANY OTHER KINDS OF SANDWICHES, SUBMARINES AND
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froD1 6:00 P.M. - 10:00 P.M.
ORDERS TAKEN TILL 9:45
Opposite Georgetown Theater
, , )
GU'Runners',Lose Frosh Hoopster McGuill' Has To Hawks, 25-36 All-Star High Schoo! Reco;d
by George Kochnian ' , " ,I, " , ,
Last Saturday morning, a strong cross-country tea m from St. Joseph's in Phila­ delphia, defeated the ~oyas by a score of 25-36. Once again, Bob Vinton and George Verdisco showed the way, each turning in the time of 19:54.5, ex­ cellent for the muddy ground.
Owen McGuill; freshman, basket- ball player on scholarship, comes to Georgetown fro m Springfield, Massachusetts, where he played center for Cathedral High School.
Owen, who stands six feet, five inches, will probably pJoay the for­ ward position this year. While at Cathedral High he ,averaged 16 points per game. He also gives added support on the backboards, averaging 17 rebounds per game.
Owen was selected to various all-star teams including the all­ cilty and all-Western Massachusetts
squads. Coach Tommy O'Keefe thinks
a lot of Owen. "He is a good com­ petitor with a lot of enthusiasm," he says. O'Keefe adds th'at Owen "has good size 'and build f'Or a forward, with a lot of speed for his size, and works hard under the blackboard." McGuill is a student in the School of Business Admin­ istration.
OWEN McGUILL ... star high school player from Springfield, Mass.
Sailors Second Georgetown's sailing team finish­
ed second to Navy and one notch above George Washington in the Greater Washington Championships at Annapolis last Sunday. Navy pulled away from the field with six firsts in as many races.
Harv O'Connor led the Hoyas with four seconds and a third.
THE SHIELDS CUP ••. is presented to victorious Georgetown Polo team by Father Gerald Kernand, S . .J. Players are, left to right, .Jerry Shields, Mike Raoul-Duval, Carlos Rizo-Patron, and Rick otto.
The l"'ace started off with the St. Joe's men setting the early pace, but by the time the runners passed the half-mile mark, Vinton and Verdisco had taken the lead. Vin­ ton and Verdisco came past the two mile mark in 9:54, ,and they had a lead of 50 yards. However, following immediately behind was almost the entire St. Joseph's team. Vinton and Verdisco kept on in­ creaSing their le'ad and won easily. However, the nem eight places went to St. Joseph's with Kevin Quinn, John Lynch, Klaus Present, and Joe McAndres all tying for third place. Tom Cawley finished eleventh in 21:20, Chuck Rend 21:33, Joe Lee 22:00, Phil Banda 22:38, Ed Beachler 22:24, Scott Clendaniel 23:24, and Frank Treut- ;:=======================:=============:===========:=:=:=:===============================================================1 lein 26:12.
'Ilbis SaturdJay, Hap Hardell's runners travel to Annapolis for a triangular meet with Navy and Pittsburgh. Last year this race, over a fine mile course, was won by Bob Vinton, who will face good competition from evenly balanced Tar and Pitt teams.
~i!lunrt
~ttutiua
Classic Ties Silk Repps __________ 2.50 Wool Challis ______ 2.50 Foulards ______________ 2.50
Gifts froln Our
San tina Roma-Italia Georgetown
Dr_ Frood, Ph. T.T_
Dear Dr. Frood: When raccoon coats swept the campus, I wore a polo coat. When the English bobby cape came in, I wore a raccoon coat. I'm always in last year's style. How come? ,-
Dated
Dear Dated: This is an anxiety complex arising out of being a "late-diaper" baby.
De,ar Dr. Frood: I am irrationally, in­ calculably, irrevocably in love with a girl on campus. How can I tell her?
Lovesick
Dear Lovesick: Use small words.
Dear Dr. Frood: When I listen to stupid people or read anything boring, I fall asleep. What can I do?
Superior
Dear Superior: Yours is an extremely difficult prob mfh zzz
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• DR. FROOD"S MORAL OF THE MONTH
Most college students today do not know the meaning of the word "adversity." Those who do are just a handful of English majors.
Dear Dr. Frood: How can I leave my husband without making him happy?
Prof's Spouse
Dear Prof's Spouse: Leave a note say­ ing you'll be back.
DR. FROOD TELLS WHO HOLDS
HIS CIGARETTE HOW
I have noticed thatthe solid, conservative type carries his cigarette between his first two fingers. The noncon­ formist carries it locked in the bend of his arm. The self-conscious type holds his lighted cigarette in his pock­ et. The most intelligent spe­ cies of all carry Lucky Stri ke (usually between their lips).
Dear Dr. Frood: Our library is full of "no smoking" signs. When I want a Lucky, I have to go outside. Is this right?
Furiolls
Dear Furious: It's monstrous. But think of the poor souls who go outside only to smoke brand X or Y or Z.
Dear Dr. Frood: Boys are always whis­ tling at me. Do you think my clothes are too snug?
Prudence
Dear Prudence: It's impossible to teU without a picture. Send one. Please.
COLLEGE STUDENTS SMOKE MORE LUCKIES THAN
ANY OTHER REGULAR! When it comes to choosing their regular smoke, college students head right for fine tobacco. Result: Lucky Strike tops every other regular ~ _______ ~ sold. Lucky's taste beats all the rest because L.S./M.F.T.-Lucky Strike means fine tobacco:
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