The New Food Guide Pyramid Table of Contents 1.Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2.The New Food Guide...

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Transcript of The New Food Guide Pyramid Table of Contents 1.Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2.The New Food Guide...

  • Slide 1
  • Slide 2
  • The New Food Guide Pyramid
  • Slide 3
  • Table of Contents 1.Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2.The New Food Guide Pyramid 3.Servings Sizes 4.Incorporating Exercise in your life
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  • Dietary Guidelines for Americans (also known as ) Published jointly every 5 years by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Department of Agriculture (USDA).
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  • Federal Governments Statement: The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2005, gives science- based advice on food and physical activity choices for health. Consist of a 80 page report Can be retrieved at www.healthierus.gov/dietaryguidelines
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  • Dietary Guidelines for Americans Americans (> 2 years) Focus on: Maintaining health and preventing chronic disease How has the focused changed? Aim for a healthy weight
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  • Dietary Guidelines for Americans Be physically active each day Let the Pyramid guide your food choices Eat a variety of grains daily, especially whole grains
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  • Dietary Guidelines for Americans Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables daily Keep food safe to eat Choose a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol and moderate in fat
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  • Dietary Guidelines for Americans Choose beverages and foods that limit your intake of sugars Choose and prepare foods with less salt If you drink alcoholic beverages, do so in moderation
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  • Dietary Guidelines for Americans Physical Activity Recommendations For health To limit weight gain To lose weight
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  • is in one neat package.. The New Food Guide Pyramid Dietary Guidelines for Americans
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  • Food Guide Pyramid Purpose: To help consumers put the Dietary Guidelines into action in their daily food choices. Allows flexibility and practicality within diets along with providing a visual tool Focus is on specific nutrients in foods
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  • Do you really know the FGP? Why is it shaped like that? Why so many colors? What is a serving size? Where is that person going?
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  • Food Guide Pyramid Changes 1992-2004 2005 Food Guide Pyramid
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  • Why use a pyramid shape? Emphasizes three key messages Variety Proportion Moderation
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  • Why is the pyramid multi-colored? Inside the pyramid there are a variety of colors. Each color is associated with a different food category.
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  • Grains Vegetables Fruits Oils Milk Meats & Beans
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  • What are Grains? Includes any foods made from wheat, rice, oats, cornmeal, barley or another cereal grains. Grains are divided into 2 subgroups, whole grains and refined grains. Whole Grain contains the entire grain kernel - the bran, germ and endosperm. Refined Grains have been milled which removes the bran, germ, fiber, iron and many B vitamins.
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  • Examples of Whole Grains Whole-wheat flour Bulgur (cracked wheat) Oatmeal Whole Cornmeal Brown rice Popcorn Wild rice Whole rye Whole wheat pasta Whole wheat bread Whole wheat sandwich buns and rolls Whole grain cornmeal Whole wheat tortillas
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  • Examples of Refined Grains White flour Degermed cornmeal White bread White rice Crackers Pretzels Pasta Flour tortillas Cornbread Corn tortillas Couscous Grits Noodles Spaghetti/Macaroni Pitas Corn flakes
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  • A little something about Refined Grains Most refined grains are enriched. Certain B vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folic acid) and iron are added back after processing.
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  • What are Vegetables? Includes any vegetable or 100% vegetable juice. Vegetables can be raw or cooked; fresh, frozen, canned, or dried/dehydrated; and may be whole, cut-up, or mashed. Broken down into five subgroups!
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  • Vegetable Sub-groups 1.Dark Green Vegetables 2.Orange Vegetables 3.Dry beans and Peas 4.Starchy Vegetables 5.Other Vegetables
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  • Dark Green Orange Vegetables Vegetables Bok choy Broccoli Collard Greens Dark green leafy lettuce Mustard greens Spinach Turnip Greens Watercress Romaine Lettuce Acorn Squash Butternut Squash Carrots Hubbard Squash Pumpkin Sweet potatoes
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  • Dry Beans and Peas Lentils Peas Black-eyed Split Beans Black Kidney Lima Pinto Soy White Garbanzo
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  • Starchy Vegetables Corn Green peas Lima beans (green) Potatoes
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  • Other Vegetables Artichokes Asparagus Turnips Bean sprouts Beets Wax Beans Brussels sprouts Cabbage Zucchini Cauliflower Celery Cucumbers Eggplant Green Beans Green/Red peppers Iceburg Lettuce Mushrooms Okra Onions Parsnips Tomatoes Tomatoes Tomato/Vegetable Juice
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  • What are Fruits? Includes any fruit or 100% fruit juice. May be fresh, canned, frozen or dried, or may be whole, cut-up, or pureed.
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  • ApplesApricotsAvocadoBanana CantaloupeHoneydewWatermelonBlueberry GrapefruitGrapesKiwiLemons LimesMangoesCocktailNectarine OrangesPeachesPearsPapaya PineapplePlumsPrunesRaisins TangerinesStrawberryRaspberryCherries
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  • What are Oils? Oils are fats that are liquid at room temperature, like the vegetable oils used in cooking. Oils come from many different plants and from fish.
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  • Common Oils Canola Oil Corn Oil Cottonseed Oil Olive Oil Safflower Oil Soybean Oil Sunflower Oil Foods naturally high in oils: Nuts Olives Some fish Avocados
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  • Solid Fats Include fats that are solid at room temperature. Examples are: Butter Beef fat Chicken fat Pork fat Stick Margarine Shortening
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  • What are these Trans Fats? They are man-made or processed fats, which are made from a liquid oil. When you add hydrogen to liquid vegetable oil and then add pressure, the result is a stiffer fat, like the fat found in a can of Crisco. Trans fats are also called hydrogenated fats. The shape of the fat molecule.
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  • What are these Trans Fats? Many manufacturers started including trans fats in their processed foods about 20 years ago to prolong their products' shelf life, but public health experts warn that these kinds of fats clog arteries and cause obesity. They can be found in cookies, crackers, icing, potato chips, margarine and microwave popcorn.
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  • What are these Trans Fats? "Numerous studies have found that trans fats raise our risk of heart disease," said Cynthia Payne, a registered dietitian at the University of Maryland Medical Center. "They can also contribute to an increase in total cholesterol levels and a drop in the healthy HDL cholesterol. These man-made fats are much worse for you than any other natural fat, even the saturated fats found in butter and beef." Listed on Food Labels
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  • What is in the Milk group? Includes all milk products and many foods made from milk.
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  • Milk, yogurt and cheese include: Milk - fat free, low-fat (1%), skim (2%), whole Yogurt - fat-free, low-fat, reduced fat, whole milk yogurt Cheese - cheddar, mozzarella, Swiss, parmesan, ricotta, cottage cheese, American Milk-based desserts - puddings, ice milk, ice cream, frozen yogurt
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  • Whats in the Meats & Beans? Includes all foods made from meat, poultry, fish, dry beans or peas, eggs, nuts and seeds. Most meat and poultry choices should be lean or low-fat. Fish, nuts, and seeds contain healthy oils, so choose these foods frequently instead of meat or poultry.
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  • Whats in the Meats & Beans? Beans Black Kidney Lima Pinto Soy White Garbanzo Meats - lean Beef, Ham, Lamb, Pork, Veal Bison, Rabbit, Venison Liver, Giblets Chicken, Duck, Goose, Turkey Chicken Eggs, Duck Eggs
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  • Whats in the Meats & Beans? Nuts & Seeds Almonds Cashews Hazelnuts Mixed nuts Peanuts Peanut Butter Pecans Pistachios Pumpkin Seeds Sesame seeds Sunflower seeds Walnuts
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  • Dont forget the fish? Shellfish - Clams, Crab, Crayfish, Lobster, Mussels, Octopus, Oysters, Scallops, Squid, Shrimp Canned Fish - Anchovies, Clams, Tuna, Sardines Finfish - Catfish, Cod, Flounder, Haddock, Halibut, Herring, Mackerel, Pollock, Porgy, Salmon, Sea bass, Snapper, Swordfish, Trout, or Tuna
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  • Choose lean or low-fat meats Go skinless Limit eggs, liver and other organ meats Watch sodium content Select fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids (salmon, trout, herring) often Sunflower seeds, almonds, and hazelnuts are preferred for increasing your vitamin E intake!
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  • Grains - Eat 6 oz. every day Vegetables - Eat 2 1/2 cups every day Fruits - Eat 2 cups every day Milk - Drink 3 cups every day Meats & Beans - Eat 5 1/2 oz. every day
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  • What does a 2,000 calorie balanced diet meal plan look like? Pyramid ItemBLD Grains 222 Vegetables 23 Fruits 211 Milk 111 Meats & Beans 1 oz2 oz3 oz
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  • Grains 1 slice of bread 1 cup of cereal 1/