Singing the Body Electric: How ePortfolios Empower College Musicians to Develop Creative Voices

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This is the slideshow of the presentation I gave at the AAEEBL ePortfolio conference on July 22, 2010.

Transcript of Singing the Body Electric: How ePortfolios Empower College Musicians to Develop Creative Voices

  • 1. Singing the Body Electric
    How ePortfolios Empower College Musicians to Develop Creative Voices

2. Introductions
Academic Discipline
Music?
Performing arts? Visual arts?
Humanities?
ePortfolio Usage
Presentation portfolio?
Assessment portfolio?
Learning/Teaching portfolio?
Hybrid of the above?
3. Introductions
Plans for Use?
Within Music Department?
Other areas?
Type of ePortfolio?
Motivation for adoption?
4. ePortfolios in Higher Education Music Programs
University-wide ePortfolio system (Presentation)
Music Education (Presentation and Learning)
Example Presentation Portfolio
Very few unit-based portfolio systems
Mostly Presentation Portfolios.
Ex.: University of Rhode Island Department of Music
Search of EPAC resources for music turns up virtually nothing (Electronic Portfolio Action and Communication )
5. University of Delaware Department of MusicePortfolio system:
Unit-based
Ordered by Programmatic Learning Goals [PLGs]
Used by all majors (performance, education, management)
Sakai-OSP
Teaching, Learning, and Assessment [TLA]
6. ePortfolios at the University of Delaware
7. Three Learning Outcome Sets for Assessment
General Education Requirements
8. UD General Education Requirements
Attain effective skills in a) oral and b) written communication, c) quantitative reasoning, and the d) use of information technology
Learn to think critically to solve problems.
Be able to work and learn both independently and collaboratively.
Engage questions of ethics and recognize responsibilities to self, community, and society at large.
Understand the diverse ways of thinking that underlie the search for knowledge in the arts, humanities, sciences and social sciences.
Develop the intellectual curiosity, confidence, and engagement that will lead to lifelong learning.
Develop the ability to integrate academic knowledge with experiences that extend beyond the boundaries of the classroom.
Expand understanding and appreciation of human creativity and diverse forms of aesthetic and intellectual expression.
Understand the foundations of United States society including the significance of its cultural diversity.
Develop an international perspective in order to live and work effectively in an increasingly global society.
9. Three Learning Outcome Sets for Assessment
General Education Requirements
Programmatic Learning Goals
10. Dept. of Music Programmatic Learning Goals
Express musical ideas through performing, composing, or improvising.
Communicate about music both orally and in written forms in an articulate and musically literate manner.
Demonstrate an appropriate level of sight reading both melodically and rhythmically.
11. Three Learning Outcome Sets for Assessment
General Education Requirements
Programmatic Learning Goals
Course Learning Goals
12. Coordination of Three Goal Sets
13. ePortfolios at the University of Delaware
14. Why Sakai OSP?
Close control over content
Connected with courses
Reflection form guidance
Possibilities for evaluation and feedback
Quantitative assessment of student growth
Integration of programmatic and institutional assessment
Shared platform, yet customizable to the needs of each particular unit
15. ePortfolios at the University of Delaware
16. Why a TLA Portfolio?
Reflective engagement
Ex. Ear-training reflections
17. Ear-training Reflective Blogs
List the specific practice sessions when youve worked on class material and with whom you have worked.(e.g. 2/12: 4-5pm with John and Kate, etc)
List the specific practice sessions when youve worked by yourself. (e.g. 2/16: 7-8pm alone with MacGamut or webpage X, etc.)
What specific topics/exercises did you work on for sight-singing?
What specific topics/exercises did you work on for ear-training?
Comment upon the time youve spent practicing? (How did your practice sessions go?Do you feel you are improving on the material?What topics/exercises are giving you trouble?etc.)
Based on the above, discuss any changes you want to incorporate into practice next week? (What are your strengths and weaknesses and which skills need the most improvement?How will you organize your limited practice time to improve your skills?Are there new approaches or exercises you want to try?etc.)
What in-class activities do you feel would best help you improve?We wont be able to accommodate every request, but will look for general trends in comprehension.
18. Why a TLA Portfolio?
Reflective engagement
Ex. Ear-training reflections
Presentation portfolios lacking in student depth and faculty support
Difficult to change types of ePortfolios
Assessment portfolios missing a chance to explore benefits for learning/teaching
TLA portfolio closely connected with courses, thus encourages faculty engagement
19. UD Music ePortfolio Matrix Sakai Interface
20. How do ePortfolios Empower Students to Develop Creative Voices?
21. AAEEBL Jeopardy
22. AAEEBL Jeopardy
23. AAEEBL Jeopardy
24. AAEEBL Jeopardy
25. AAEEBL Jeopardy
26. AAEEBL Jeopardy
27. AAEEBL Jeopardy
28. AAEEBL Jeopardy
29. AAEEBL Jeopardy
30. AAEEBL Jeopardy
31. Who is the Body that Sings?
32. Who is the Body that Sings?
How does this clip frame the bodies that sing?Who are these bodies?
What does the larger trajectory of this clip in regard to the body that sings?
How might the effect of this clip be different had the movement been from greater to fewer numbers of people singing?
Do you perceive any hierarchies, and how are they treated over the course of this excerpt? Are there bodies that are marked or unmarked? Privileged or unprivileged?
What are the skill sets being demonstrated, and how do these relate to the bodies who sing?
33. Centered Model of Identity
34. Decentered Model of Identity
35. Decentered Model of Musical Identity
36. Centered Educational Model
37. Decentered Educational Model
38. Decentered Educational Model Better Yet
39. What is at stake?
40. How does one play the sunset?
41. Developing a Musical Identity:Two Examples of Integrative/Reflective Learning
Music Circles
42. UD Music ePortfolio Matrix
43. Music Circles
INSTRUCTIONS: Consider personal musical experiences that have impacted your life by filling in these categories and the impact they have had on your life by filling in the spaces below each category listed below. Then, on an unlined sheet of paper, create a music circle diagram. Label each circle with the category title. Inside the circle, write a short description of the music that fits within each category. Then, draw connecting lines between those circles that intersect in some way. Some circles may be related, or connected; others may stand alone. Once you have finished your music circle, upload it (either as a Word Doc or scanned PDF) to your ePortfolio using the prompt at the bottom of this form.
Early memoriessongs you remember being sung to you
Songs you recall singing in school
Musical works you have performed
Songs you can sing, or pieces you can play in their entirety from memory
Recordings you would not want to live without
Your least favorite music examples
Music you have heard or performed in the past 24 hours
Music you have taught, or love to teach, to others
Music that puzzles, intrigues, or challenges you
Music that others might be surprised to know you like
Additional categories
44. Example Music Circles Artifact
45. Developing a Musical Identity:Two Examples of Integrative/Reflective Learning
Music Circles
Improvising a Prelude
46. UD Music ePortfolio Matrix
47. Composing a Prelude
48. What is the role of the ePortfolio in (Higher-Ed) (Music) (Programs)?
To make the whole educational experience as integrative as its parts.
In other words, to make music education musical.
49. UD Music ePortfolio Matrix Performance/Academic Areas
50. Three Types of Reflection (after Van Manen, 1991)
Anticipatory Reflection planning, goals, decision making, anticipation of results
Active (or Interactive) Reflection occurs during an activity and may control how it unfolds
Recollective Reflection studies and synthesizes past experiences, giving them deeper meaning
51. Reflection Form:Sophomore Fall PLG1C - Improvisation
1. Upload the following two documents: 1) an mp3 recording of a complete piece or musical idea that represents your best improvising of the semester and 2) a PDF of the harmonic framework over which you improvised.2. What makes this recording representative of your best work in the area of improvisation? What features do you find particularly interesting or remarkable? Are there any moments that sound weak or less well conceived? As you discuss your improvisation, please point out particular passages by noting the minutes and seconds (for example, 2'35").3. Improvisation involves the spontaneous production of music within a set of pre-defined parameters governing harmonic structure, harmonic rhythm, rhythmic and melodic figuration, formal design, register, timbre, and dynamics. Describe the parameters you chose to focus on for this improvisation, and then discuss some of the ways that your improvisation explores these parameters. Did the parameters within which you improvised ultimately serve to inhibit your creativity, or rather did they focus it? Please explain.4. Having already worked on impr