Nrich department meetings A teacher’s perspective

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    12-Jan-2016
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Nrich department meetings A teacher’s perspective. Asnat Doza. What it should be. An opportunity to discuss maths with colleagues An opportunity to share teaching ideas with fellow teachers Another lesson plan done!. 3 things it should not be. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Transcript of Nrich department meetings A teacher’s perspective

  • Nrich department meetingsA teachers perspectiveAsnat Doza

  • What it should beAn opportunity to discuss maths with colleaguesAn opportunity to share teaching ideas with fellow teachersAnother lesson plan done!

  • 3 things it should not be

  • A session in which the focus is on solving a set of mathematical problems

  • An opportunity to show off your maths skills

  • Competition time

  • Key to a successful meetingEveryone should feel comfortable and welcome to contribute

  • Suggested meeting formatWorking in small groupsLooking at a new Nrich problemBrain storm/sharing ideas on how go teach this problemSharing ideas with all the departmentImplementing in class

  • Todays problem:Consecutive sumsMany numbers can be expressed as the sum of two or more consecutive integers: 15=7+810=1+2+3+4

    What can you say about numbers which canbe expressed in this way? Try to prove your statements

  • Which class or classes would you teach this problem to?Nrich asks: What can you say about numbers which can be expressed in this way? Can you think of other questions you might ask your learners in relation to this problem?How will you differentiate?Which department resources can you use to teach this problem to lower and higher ability groups?

  • The hints: Start by trying some simple cases. Which numbers can be written as the sum of two consecutive numbers? Which numbers can be written as the sum of three consecutive numbers? Which numbers can be written as the sum of four, five, six... consecutive numbers? Can all numbers be written as the sum of consecutive numbers? 1+2+3=6 so 2+3+4 must add up to 3 more.

  • Will you introduce the hints to your classes? If so, how and when will you do this?