Midtown Tokyo

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Tác giả Roppongi

Transcript of Midtown Tokyo

  • Tokyo Midtown

  • Open space fl ows easily into the Tokyo Midtown site from surrounding streets and sidewalks, creating a strong sense of being on the ground, in touch with the earth and nature. Interior and exterior spaces are characterized by a feeling of interconnectedness. Major view corridors, windows, bridges, and plazas open out onto open spaces, orienting the viewer relative to the park and to nature.

    Multiple and layered design ideas have blended at Tokyo Midtown to create a unique sequence of open spaces. The designs starting point involved building upon and emphasizing existing site characteristics, such as topography and a lush, mature tree canopy. These elements were reconfi gured and layered with new elements that reinterpret the sites cultural and natural histories, carefully focused to create rich experiential qualities and a distinct sense of place.

    Design Ideas

    Our design approach created streams of connective landscapes, from the most urbane to the most gardenesque, melding cultural design infl uences from Rockefeller Center to the gardens of Kyoto. The emphasis is on experience over visual composition. JOE BROWN, EDAW CEO

  • Wa: as I understand it, this word translates as the essence of Japanese-ness. The goal was to capture that in a modern way in the landscape and the architecture. The design touches on, but doesnt stem from, a deep understanding of Japanese culture.I think thats exactly what Mitsui Fudosan wanted to achieve by hiring an American design fi rm. STEVE HANSON, EDAW PRINCIPAL, DESIGN LEAD

    A historic stream that once traversed the site is reinterpreted as a contemporary, romanticized water feature, drawing people into the park and leading down though meandering pathways to the 21_21 Design Museum, the Great Lawn, and the traditional Japanese Garden.

    Pedestrian bridges jut out to meet the park spaces, reinforcing the notion of interpenetration and connectedness. The juxtaposition and weaving of architectural landscape and abstracted natural formsthe curving architecture of the skylights in the plaza and straight lines overlaid onto the meandering stream in the parkcreates tension between elements.

  • At a Glance Our intent was to establish a town where a novel collection of Japanese values, sensibilities, and capabilities is continuously created, built up, and delivered to the world. We also wanted to celebrate nature and hospitality; entertaining and showing respect for the guest is very important in Japan. TOSHIHIDE ICHIKAWA, MITSUI FUDOSAN CO., LTD. GENERAL MANAGER

    Tokyo Midtown is a mixed-use development located in the heart of the Roppongi District.

    Project design began August 2002, with construction documentation completed in February 2004.

    Archaeological exploration was conducted from March 2002 to August 2003. Over fi fty thousand pieces of Edo-period (1596-1698) pottery were found, along with two gold coins.

    Construction began on May 18, 2004.

    Over 50% of the projects total area is dedicated to open space.

    Over 140 mature, existing trees were transplanted.

    The projects total cost: $3.1 billion US.

    The central building, Tokyo Midtown Tower, is the second tallest building in Japan at 248 meters (814 feet).

    The total development is 10.1 hectares (25 acres), including a refurbished, 400-year-old site Hinokicho Park.

    Total fl oor area of 563,800 square meters (6 million square feet):

    - Commercial: 71,000 sq m / 764,000 sq ftOffi ce: 311,200 sq m / 3,350,000 sq ftHousing: 117,500 sq m / 1,265,000 sq ftHotel: Ritz-Carlton, top 9 fl oors of main tower, 248 roomsRetail: 130 stores and restaurants (22,000 sq m / 237,000 sq ft)Museums / Other: 20,300 sq m / 219,000 sq ft Parking: two fl oors below grade

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  • The close collaboration between SOM and EDAW from the very beginning of the Tokyo Midtown work is evident in the seamless, holistic integration of the sites elements. The projects organization blends Japanese landscape design through-out the complex to create a unique urban environment.MUSTAFA ABADAN, FAIADESIGN PARTNER, SKIDMORE OWINGS & MERRILL

  • Tokyo Midtowns great lawn is a particularly unusual feature in Japan; the standard for Japanese design is usually on a more intimate scale. It is an architectural expression in the landscape, overlaid onto the softer, stream-like forms of the park. The designers wanted to provide open, inviting green spaces that can be programmed for events as well as ones more conducive to solitude and horticultural interest.

    40 mature cherry trees were preserved and transplanted on site, linking the entryway to Hinokicho Park and creating a cherry promenade. Cherry-blossom season is a storied time of celebration in Japan. When the trees are in bloom, people take off time from work to gather at their favorite tree with a blanket, picnic, and drinks. During this season, Tokyo Midtown can expect thousands of visitors attracted by the opportunity to celebrate the cycle of seasons and the beauty of the trees.

    Open & Inviting

    Midtown is a new touchstone for regeneration of the Roppongi district. It will infl uence new development throughout Tokyo, Japan and beyond. TODD KOHLI, EDAW SENIOR ASSOCIATE

    In a contemporary, dense urban environment, it is critical to have space that feels welcoming and attractive in order to stimulate the cultural and social interaction that gives the place life. AKI OMI, EDAW SENIOR ASSOCIATE

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    EDAW Inc - San Francisco150 Chestnut Street, San Francisco, CA 94111, USATel: (415) 955-2800 Fax: (415) 788-4875

    LEFT TO RIGHT: Steve Hanson Principal - Design Lead,Todd Kohli Senior Associate - Landscape Architect,Joe Brown CEO, Aki Omi Senior Associate

    CLIENT: Mitsui Fudosan Co., Ltd.

    Skidmore, Owings and Merrill (New York, USA)Communication Arts, Inc. (Colorado, USA)Fisher Marantz Stone (New York, USA)Buro Happold (New York, USA)Nikken Sekkei, Ltd. (Tokyo, Japan)Kengo Kuma & Associates (Tokyo, Japan)Sakakura Associates Architects and Engineers (Tokyo, Japan)Jun Aoki and Associates (Tokyo, Japan)Tadao Ando Architect and Associates (Osaka, Japan)Construction Team: Takenaka Corporation and Taisei Corporation (Tokyo, Japan)

  • www.edaw.comwww.edaw.com

    Printed on recycled paperPrinted on recycled paper

  • 94 U R B A N LA N D A P R I L 2 0 0 7

    Traditionally, green space in Tokyo is in the form ofprivate gardens and sacred spaces: landscapes designed tobe looked at rather than used. Tokyo is not thought of as a cityof public parks like those found in New York or Paris, but withthe opening last month of developer Mitsui Fudosan Co., Ltd.sTokyo Midtown project, that perception soon may change.

    Situated on two main roads within the Roppongi District,this new mixed-use development includes Class A officespace, high-end retail, restaurants, residential units, a RitzCarlton hotel, a museum, and a convention center. A distinc-tively unusual feature is that 50 percent of the projects 25acres (ten ha) is made up of parks, promenades, street-scapes, and plazas.

    Developer Mitsui Fudosan acquired an exceptionally raresite. Then, six organizations, with Mitsui as the lead repre-sentative, partnered to purchase the Tokyo Midtown land.One of the sites most valuable attributes is its continuity,

    which allowed the developers to skip the customary processof purchasing several disparate abutting parcels and cob-bling them together. The site was originally the estate of anEdo-period feudal lord where past archaeological investiga-tions turned up hundreds of pieces of pottery and other arti-facts, including several 15th-century gold coins. The Japanesearmy subsequently used the property in various ways; afterWorld War II, the U.S. Army had barracks on the site, and inits last incarnation, the Japanese Defense Agency occupiedit. The government decided to sell the land in 2001, and theconsortium led by Mitsui Fudosan won it at auction in Sep-tember of that year.

    Mitsui Fudosan was looking for a decidedly nontraditionalattitude toward the open-space program and chose a designteam from outside Japan that included design architectsSkidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) and landscape architectsEDAW, Inc. Local touchstones for the open-space program

    Tokyos new

    green, mixed-use

    midtown project is

    designed to create

    an urban oasis.

    T O D D K O H L I FOUND INTranslation

    EDAW

    /TODD

    KOHLI

    The Tokyo Midtown project includes a great lawn, an unusual feature in Japan where greenspace traditionally has been confined to private gardens and sacred spaces. Fifty percent ofthe projects 25 acres (ten ha) is made up of parks, promenades, streetscapes, and plazas.

    EDAW

    /TODD

    KOHLI

  • A P R I L 2 0 0 7 U R B A N LA N D 95

    were more difficult to find. The largest public open spacewithin Tokyo is the Imperial Palace, the walls of which are sur-rounded by parklands. Although the palace grounds are avaluable cultural and historic asset, they are cut off from thecitys context by a wide, encircling road. Essentially, the palaceis an island, with no associated development adjacent to theproperty. The palaces grounds are a political landscape,explains Steve Hanson, EDAWs principal-in-charge of the proj-ect. By design, they