Ltr2 - Gaming and Libraries

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Transcript of Ltr2 - Gaming and Libraries

OPEN HOUSE

Gaming and Libraries:Learning From the Intersections

By Jenny Levine

Charlie Terng, Darlene Davis, Ryan Dement, Jen Lemke, Elizabeth Dunn

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Lessons Weve Learned From Society

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Lessons Weve Learned From Society

Violence and VideogamesMost people assume a causal link between violence and videogames.In 2007, only 15% of videogames sold were rated M or adult.Just as not every PG-13 movie is appropriate for every 13 year old, not every E or T game may be appropriate for every child or teen.

Lessons Weve Learned From Society

Grand Theft Childhood: The Surprising Truth About Video GamesIn 2004, Drs. Kutner and Olsen initiated the largest and most in-depth unbiased study of video games in the U.S.Over 1,200 middle school students and 500 parents surveyed over a two year periodReport described some behavior problems linked to videogamesbut not how most people would expect

Lessons Weve Learned From Society

Grand Theft Childhood: The Surprising Truth About Video GamesGirls more than boys (12% vs. 3%) were more likely to report bullying, being in fights, or trouble in the classroom.Only one problem behavior (hitting) was significantly linked to near-daily game play.The vast majority of M-gamer kids did not report the behavior problems long associated with violent video games.Boys who didnt regularly play video games were more likely to get into fights than any other group.M-game players were significantly more likely to play games in social settings, with one or more friends in the same room.

Lessons Weve Learned From Society

Grand Theft Childhood: The Surprising Truth About Video Games

www.grandtheftchildhood.com

Lessons Weve Learned From Society

Benefits of Playing Video GamesAllow teens to try on roles and behaviors in a safe environmentProvide practice in planning and anticipating consequencesMay help teens manage difficult emotionsMay promote involvement in sports/exerciseCan improve visual/spatial skillsProvide a focus for socializingMay provide a source of self-esteem and pride

Lessons Weve Learned From Society

Pew/Internet study Teens, Video Games, and Civics, released September 2008Only 24% of teens ONLY play video games alone.Some qualities of game play have a strong and consistent positive relationship to a range of civic outcomes.Teens who take part in social interaction related to games are more engaged socially and civically

Lessons Weve Learned From Society

The Civic Potential of Video Games A must-read for any library offering or considering offering game playGaming in public spaces help nurture democratic values and political engagementModel John Deweys conception of democratic community, therefore can be useful learning tools, especially in a school setting

Lessons Weve Learned From Society

What does any of this have to do with libraries?Dont have the constraints of schools (time, No Child Left Behind)No barrier to entrySafe, noncommercial spaceDiversityLibraries offering this kind of space and experience are seeing success

Libraries, Videogames and Civic Engagement

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Libraries, Videogames and Civic Engagement

A Pew/MacArthur study found that playing video games can offer opportunities for positive civic experiences for youth and foster connections to the community.

Providing opportunities for youth to play games together in a safe, non-commercialized space gives kids a place outside of school to come together, meet new people and learn to resolve their differences without adult intervention.

Libraries, Videogames and Civic Engagement

The focus groups interviewed for the report maintain that key appeal of libraries was the transformative power of libraries to make people better human beings.This transformative powernot booksis our brand as libraries, and this happens in relation to people, communal spaces, social programs and a wide variety of services beyond books. Gaming programs draws in patrons otherwise unlikely to visit the library and encourages them to use the library for purposes other than gamingeven checking out books!

Libraries, Videogames and Civic Engagement: Case Study #1

Case Study #1John C. Fremont Library in small rural town of Florence, Colorado serves about 5,000 peopleIn the 4,000 square foot library, small space in corner devoted to gaming which contains a TV, an Xbox, a Game Cube and Play Station 2There is no video game or movie rental store in the areavideo games are the second highest circulating collection of library

Libraries, Videogames and Civic Engagement: Case Study #1

Gaming has truly transformed the library into a youth friendly place and improved the communitys opinion of the library.

Holding tournaments and making games available for checkout draws people who would normally never set foot in a library.

Video gaming is not just marketing strategy but a supplement to other library activities.

Libraries, Videogames and Civic Engagement: Case Study #1

Tournament StructureOpen to all ages, but mostly frequented by teensIn order to compete, must have a library card and no outstanding fines Two or three gaming stations are availableNormally held Saturdays at 2:30, 30 min. after closingA bracket system used to determine when people playFood is always availableOnly rule is NO MATURE-RATED GAMES ALLOWEDSince inception, held every other month

Libraries, Videogames and Civic Engagement: Case Study #1

The library often collaborates with other community organizations and schools for gaming tournamentsTournaments have been held for middle school and high school as incentive for academic achievement

Libraries, Videogames and Civic Engagement: Case Study #2

Case Study #2Ann Arbor District Library in downtown Ann Arbor, Michigan serving a much larger population (millions)Averages 3 event gaming weekends per month , with different games and format for different audiences, which all began with a Mario Kart tournament for teens in August 2004One of the first public libraries to experiment with gaming to attract kids and teens

Libraries, Videogames and Civic Engagement: Case Study #2

AfterThe library is awesome!The library has exactly what Im into!The library does it better than anyone!The library give me something I cant get anywhere else!

BeforeThe library sucks.The library has nothing of interest.The library would do it wrong.Who needs libraries anymore?

Key part of the experience is a redefined understanding of the library

Libraries, Videogames and Civic Engagement: Case Study #2

CommunityAADL found that their events and gaming blogs have allowed a tight-knit community of players to form with the library at its center and library staff as sought-after nodes in that network. Gaming can help young patrons view library staff in a more favorable lightProviding an online forum allows community formed to continue

Libraries, Videogames and Civic Engagement

2008 Pew Internet and American Life Project report Teens, Video Games, and Civics

Many experiences in game play are similar to classroom-based civic learning opportunities. Those playing games often simulate civic action, help or guide other players, participate in guilds or other groups associated with the game, learn about social issues, and grapple with ethical issues.

Libraries, Videogames and Civic Engagement

It has been found that the more frequently players had civic gaming experiences, the more likely they were to be engaged in their community.Playing games with others IN PERSON was related to civic and political outcomes, but playing with others ONLINE did not.In these gaming situations, kids and teens help each other, the foundation of civil engagement.Gaming can provide opportunities for healthy pride in the community and the library.

A Powerful Draw Beyond Youth Culture

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A Powerful Draw Beyond Youth Culture: Case Study#3

Oak Park Public LibrarySuccessful Game Nights for Teens and ElderlyGenre XBlog and Book ClubHi/Lo Tech NightHop On Pop

A Powerful Draw Beyond Youth Culture: Case Study#3

AccomplishmentsHigher Profile and Enhanced Image for LibraryStaff Experience with New TechnologyEstablished New RelationshipsContribution to Community

The Benefits of a Planned Approach

A case study in project planning and management.

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The Benefits of a Planned Approach:Case Study #4

By Rod Wagner and the staff of the Nebraska Library Commission (NLC)

The Benefits of a Planned Approach: Case Study#4

NLCs Project DevelopmentKept a record of ALL emailsOpenly blogged about processMade a formal proposal in writing to the commission director requesting funds.

The Benefits of a Planned Approach:Case Study #4

Auditors FindingsThe purchase of gaming equipment was a questionable use of public funds.The games were not complicated so did not require the Commission to demonstrate their use to library staff.The Commission is using social networking sites on State time and with State computers which appears to be an inappropriate use of public funds.Photos and videos are posted to websites using State computers on State time without managements approval.The Commission paid sales tax on the gaming equipment ($29.26).

The Benefits of a Planned Approach:Case Study #4

NLCs RebuttalsRegarding the games were not complicated issue, librarians in the state vary widely in terms of their comfort level with technology and equipment.The NLC is not the only state agency using Web 2.0 sites.

The Benefits of a Planned Approach: Case Study#4

SummaryMake goalsDocument decisions