Leadership styles

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Transcript of Leadership styles

  • 1. LEADERSHIP STYLES Leadership is the process by which a person exerts influence over other people and inspires, motivates, and directs their activities to help achieve group or organizational goals.

2. LEADERSHIP STYLES Effective leadership increases an organizations ability to meet all challenges, including the need to obtain a competitive advantage, the need to foster ethical behavior, and the need to manage a diverse workforce fairly and equitably. (Moorhead & Griffin, 2004). 3. LEADERSHIP STYLES The leadership styles developed by Stogdill (1962) at the Ohio State University outlined four combinations of the two dimensions initiating structure behaviors and consideration behaviors . 4. LEADERSHIP STYLES Quadrant I Leaders Quadrant II Leaders Quadrant III Leaders Quadrant IV Leaders 5. Quadrant I Leaders

  • Low on considerationandhigh on initiating structure.This leader is production-oriented and interested in getting the work done; often forgetting in the process that he or she is dealing with human beings.

6. Quadrant II Leaders

  • Exhibits evidences of:
  • consideration.
  • initiating structure behaviors.
  • Such a leader is efficient and effective in managing both people and tasks.

7. Quadrant III Leaders

  • High on considerationbutlow on initiating structure.This leader maintains a friendly relationship with the subordinates and is concerned about subordinate welfare, butis ineffective in getting things done.

8. Quadrant IV Leaders

  • Low on both consideration and initiating structure.This leader's management is accompanied bygroup chaos and ineffectiveness .

9. LEADERSHIP STYLES House (1971) suggested that initiating structure leadership styles are most valuable when tasks that are stressful or dissatisfying, while the consideration styles are most appropriate for tasks that are clear and routine in nature. 10. LEADERSHIP STYLES The styles high in initiating structure are also related to higher productivity, but tend to generate higher employee grievance rates and turnover. The consideration styles, by contrast, have been associated with satisfied subordinates and fewer absences (Immegart, 1988). 11. LEADERSHIP STYLES However, Lunenberg and Ornstein (1991) point out principal leadership behaviors that are high both in consideration and initiating structure also result in high satisfaction and performance among school teachers. 12. LEADERSHIP STYLES However, Lunenberg and Ornstein (1991) point out principal leadership behaviors that are high both in consideration and initiating structure also result in high satisfaction and performance among school teachers. 13. LEADERSHIP STYLES Evidence also found by Chu and Fus (2004) that leadership styles are highly associated with employee PCs. That is, when leaders demonstrated quadrant II behaviors, the employees had better PC satisfaction.