ISSN 0738-9396 Mid-Atlantic Archivist...Volume 49 | No. 2 SPRING 2020 ISSN 0738-9396 Mid-Atlantic...

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Inside: 1 From the Chair 2 e Buchanan County Courthouse Flood of 1977 4 African American Artists in the Archives: e Alva Rogers Papers at NYU 6 An Archive is an Archive No Matter How Small: A Deeper Look into the Treasure Trove of Information in the Archives 8 19th Amendment Anniversary 9 Following in Famous Footsteps 10 Caucus News 15 Diversity and Inclusion Session Scholarship Debuts 16 MARAC Spring 2021: Saratoga Springs 17 Volunteer to Serve on a MARAC Committee 18 New Members 19 Treasurer’s Report 20 Image Credits Delaware | District of Columbia | Maryland | New Jersey | New York | Pennsylvania | Virginia | West Virginia Volume 49 | No. 2 SPRING 2020 ISSN 0738-9396 Mid-Atlantic Archivist

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Transcript of ISSN 0738-9396 Mid-Atlantic Archivist...Volume 49 | No. 2 SPRING 2020 ISSN 0738-9396 Mid-Atlantic...

  • Inside:1 From the Chair

    2 The Buchanan County Courthouse Flood of 1977

    4 African American Artists in the Archives: The Alva Rogers Papers at NYU

    6 An Archive is an Archive No Matter How Small: A Deeper Look into the Treasure Trove of Information in the Archives

    8 19th Amendment Anniversary

    9 Following in Famous Footsteps

    10 Caucus News

    15 Diversity and Inclusion Session Scholarship Debuts

    16 MARAC Spring 2021: Saratoga Springs

    17 Volunteer to Serve on a MARAC Committee

    18 New Members

    19 Treasurer’s Report

    20 Image Credits

    Delaware | District of Columbia | Maryland | New Jersey | New York | Pennsylvania | Virginia | West Virginia

    Volume 49 | No. 2

    SPRING 2020ISSN 0738-9396

    Mid-Atlantic Archivist

  • 1 | Mid-Atlantic Archivist

    Colleagues,

    This column marks my last as MARAC chair. I appreciate the opportunity I have had to serve in this role and want to thank

    several people for the contributions they have made

    to the organization over the past year. All of you made it a pleasure to

    be MARAC chair, and I hope to work with you again in the future.

    First and foremost, I could not have asked for a better chair-elect than Jennie Knies. Jennie was always willing to jump in and lend her expertise. I am excited to see what Jennie accomplishes as chair with our newly elected Chair-Elect Tara Wink. Jennie and Tara, along with the rest of the executive committee, Mary Mannix, Caitlin Rizzo, and Amanda Koss May, and MARAC Administrator Sara Predmore are going to make a wonderful team. MARAC is in very capable hands!

    I would also like to thank several people for their dedicated committee work during my term as chair. Josué Hurtado and members of the Diversity and Inclusion Committee, thank you for your work on our new Diversity and Inclusion Session Scholarship, which will first be awarded at our fall 2020 meeting in Long Branch, N.J. I look forward to attending the D&I-themed sessions that result and encourage all MARAC members to check out the new scholarship (more details on page 15) and consider applying.

    Another committee that deserves special attention is the Membership Committee chaired by Sara Borden. Membership along with D&I, Education, and the Meetings Coordinating Committee have been instrumental in making our 2020 Membership Survey a reality. Learning more about our members and what they hope to gain from our organization will be instrumental as we plan for the future.

    Speaking of the future, another important new venture is the Meeting Model Task Force headed up by Members-at-Large Elizabeth Scott and Hillary Kativa. Their work

    is just beginning, but I appreciate that both of them volunteered to lead this committee. Thank you also to our Historian Lauren Brown for the research he has done on the history of MARAC’s meeting model and Mary Mannix for the advice she has already provided.

    Thank you to all of our outgoing committee members and congratulations to everyone recently elected. I want to send a special thank you to Michael Martin, newly appointed co-chair of the Communications Committee. Michael recently stepped down as associate editor of the Mid-Atlantic Archivist. Current editor Jodi Boyle noted that Michael had been editor or associate editor of the MAA since the winter 2008 issue. That is a dozen years of service! Thank you again Michael, and we are so glad to have you continue on the Communications Committee.

    If you yourself feel like answering the call to service, please consider volunteering for one of the many appointed positions with current openings. See Chair-Elect Jennie Knies’s article on page 17 for a full list of opportunities.

    I will miss seeing all of you in Harrisonburg. It was unfortunate that we had to cancel the conference, but it was the right thing to do. In the meantime, please take care and be well. I hope we can all come back together in the fall.

    Rachel Grove RohrbaughMARAC Chair

    MARAC Chair

    RACHEL GROVE ROHRBAUGH

  • Mid-Atlantic Archivist | 2

    An earlier version of this article appeared in the summer 2019 issue of CCRP News, the Newsletter of Virginia’s Circuit Courts Records Preservation Program at the Library of Virginia.

    The Library of Virginia can trace its preservation efforts back to the Civil War, and possibly earlier (depending on how one defines preservation). One of the most significant conservation collaborations between the Library of Virginia and a Virginia clerk’s office occurred in Buchanan County in 1977.

    In 1971, Connis Brown, the archivist who would become the first head of the Local Records program, traveled across the state interviewing circuit court clerks and surveying the collections and the conditions at each courthouse. Brown’s surveys provide an unrestrained assessment of the courthouse, clerk’s office, condition of the records, environmental conditions in the records rooms and other storage areas, and, sometimes, even the clerks themselves.

    In his 1971 examination of the Buchanan County Courthouse

    in Grundy, Va., Brown noted in his report that the bulk of the court records were lost in an 1885 fire. His survey also indicates that, in addition to the first floor clerk’s office, a portion of the records were stored in the basement with court exhibits. During his visit, he noted that the courthouse’s masonry construction appeared to be fireproof. Grundy is located at the confluence of the Levisa Fork River and Slate Creek. When heavy rains fell in 1977, the town experienced the worst flooding in its history and the fireproof masonry construction could not stop the rising floodwaters that rushed into the first floor records room and the overflow storage area in the basement.

    As a result, Buchanan County’s court records were under nearly three feet of water for two days and subject to dampness for nearly a week before State Library staff members were able to make their way into the disaster area. During their time underwater, the 300 affected volumes worked like sponges, absorbing so much moisture that they had to be pried from the roller-shelving units. By the time the water receded, the records in the basement were a total loss and those on the first floor were thoroughly saturated.

    The Buchanan County Courthouse Flood of 1977By Eddie Woodward

    All photographs for this article depict records salvage operations following flooding in Buchanan County in 1977. Records Salvage Operations Buchanan County Flood (1977) and Green County Fire (1979), Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia.

  • 3 | Mid-Atlantic Archivist

    After assessing the situation, State Archivist Louis Manarin determined that freeze-drying was the only acceptable solution. The records were then transported to Richmond, where they were stored at Richmond Cold Storage at below-zero temperature for nearly a month.

    In the meantime, Manarin negotiated the use of the space simulation (or decompression) chambers at the General Electric Space Center in Valley Forge, Pa. The books were then transported in a refrigerated truck to Pennsylvania, and, once there, were placed on rolling racks and pushed into the chamber. The pressure in the chamber was then lowered, causing the rapid evaporation of water. The “GE experts also used small auxiliary heaters originally designed to be used on water beds” to speed up the process, according to the report. At the end of the freeze-drying process, approximately one gallon of water was extracted from each of the 300 volumes. After they were removed from the chamber, the books were sterilized and treated to help reduce the growth of mold and mildew. The volumes were then returned to the county courthouse.

    Today, a large number of these records are stored at the Library of Virginia, where one can still find remnants of “flood mud” on the volumes. The Buchanan County Courthouse was renovated and expanded in 1982 and the clerk’s office was moved to the second floor of the building (just in case).

  • As a dual degree student of New York University and Long Island University’s MA/MLIS program, I am currently working to get both my Master of Arts in English Literature and my Master of Library and Information Science. This is because, along with my love of the archives, I have a passion for African American literature. As an aspiring Black archivist, it is personally and professionally important to me to preserve the history of African American writers, artists, and cultures.

    I am currently nearing the end of a year-long fellowship with the American Research Libraries’s (ARL) Mosaic program. As a part of the program, I have been working as an intern in New York University’s (NYU) Archival Collections Management Department (ACM). The ACM team manages the collections of NYU’s Special Collections, which consists of three repositories: Fales Archives, New York University Archives, and the Tamiment Library & Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives. The goal of my internship is to participate in ACM projects around inclusive description and access by arranging and describing collections from underrepresented groups.

    My first large collection is the papers of African American artist, playwright, vocalist, actress, and songwriter, Alva Rogers. Rogers is best known for her role as Eula Peazant in the 1991 film Daughters of the Dust, the first feature film directed by an African American woman in the United States. However, Rogers has been involved in numerous creative endeavors throughout her career. As a playwright, Rogers wrote plays such as Nightbathing, The Doll Plays, and Scooping the Darkness Empty, which are inspired by themes of surrealism and magic realism. Rogers was also a vocalist in the New York City alternative rock band Band of Susans. The collection is mostly comprised of various ephemera relating to Rogers’s theatrical performances and art shows as well as scripts and sheet music written by her. The collection documents Rogers’s creative processes with notated manuscripts, research, and source materials. Included in the collection are original, unpublished scripts for her popular Doll Plays, a score for her musical Sunday: a Musical Fable, and a full-length audio recording of a 1995 performance of Nightbathing. Also included are personal materials such as journals, letters, and photo albums, mostly relating to her life in New York City.

    When I first began, I felt honored to have the opportunity to process the Rogers Papers, but at the same time was completely overwhelmed. There are so many silences in archives where the

    Nicholas Caldwell pictured working on the Alva Rogers Papers in NYU’s Archival Collections Management office. Photograph courtesy of Nicholas Caldwell.

    African American Artists in the Archives:The Alva Rogers Papers at NYU By Nicholas Caldwell

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    history of Black people, of women, of underrepresented voices should be. Knowing this, I made it a goal to diligently arrange and describe the collection to make it discoverable to researchers. However, the act of surveying the material, creating a processing plan, and describing a collection were all very new skills to me. A particular challenge of this collection was the various mediums included in the collection: paper; photographs; born-digital materials; and audiovisual materials including cassettes, VHS tapes, and open-reel audio tapes. Through close attention to detail and in-depth research using online and print sources, the story of each object was slowly revealed to me.

    I found a new discovery in every box I surveyed. Going through correspondences and original scripts, seeing Polaroids of gallery exhibitions, and listening to live performances—it was inspiring to me to create a plan to process the collection. I found editorial notes from interlocutors such as Kerry James Marshall, a hand-written note from Gwendolyn Brooks, and a recommendation by Spike Lee. As a scholar of African American literature and culture, the story of this collection and Rogers’s work was amazing to discover. It made me put forth my best efforts to inclusively describe the collection and work to make the finding aid as accessible as possible. I look forward to soon publishing the completed finding aid to exhibit everything that the collection has to offer for researchers of African American art and culture.

    My ultimate career goal is to work as an archivist for collections pertaining to underserved and oppressed communities. Specifically, I want to work with cultural special collections to expand access to knowledge that is often obscured and to preserve cultural history for those who need it most. I want to use my skills to increase community engagement with these collections and their materials. I hope that by working with the ACM team to make the Alva Rogers Papers visible to students, faculty, and researchers that I can help to preserve the work of this great artist for the future.

    Nicholas Caldwell is a 2019-2020 MARAC Graduate School Archival Education Scholarship recipient.

    Alva Rogers. Copyright Alva Rogers. Courtesy of Fales Library, New York University.

  • Mid-Atlantic Archivist | 6

    At first glance, the Chatham University Archives & Special Collections is quaint and unassuming. The doorway leading into the processing/reading room is nestled in a corner of the basement of the Jennie King Mellon Library, where there are no windows and cell phone reception is non-existent. The collections are small, and all of them describe one collective record - the history of Chatham University. The average researcher might think that they won’t find anything useful in this archive, unless they were researching Chatham University history. But that researcher would be incredibly mistaken. When it comes to the Chatham University Archives & Special Collections, there’s more than meets the eye.

    I began working at Chatham in August 2019 as part of my graduate studies at the University of Pittsburgh. I’m working on my Master of Library and Information Science, seeking to make my career about increasing access to and interest in archival collections. One of the ways that is done in our increasingly digitized world is by digitizing archival collections. This process involves scanning the object into a digital image, describing the object by creating what is known as metadata, and then finding some way to publish the collection (most places use a repository like JSTOR Forum, as we do at Chatham, but there are lots of ways to handle this step!). One of my first projects when I stepped on campus was to finish up the digitization process for the student newspapers (which was supported by the Council of Independent Colleges, Consortium for Digital Resources for Teaching and Research, Consortium Development Grant), and now that most of them are available online, one thing I want to draw attention

    to is how this particular collection fits the description “more than meets the eye.”

    The student newspapers collection is fascinating. Spanning over one hundred years, it is certainly a fantastic source of Chatham history, but I think many would be surprised to know that it’s a great source of general history as well. Chatham students certainly wrote about more than what was for lunch in the cafeteria in their newspaper; in one of the earlier newspapers, called Sorosis, from the late 1800s, a student wrote an opinion piece about why she thought the women’s suffrage movement was bad and why she thought women shouldn’t have the right to vote. More recent editions of student newspapers at Chatham feature

    articles on topics like the recent Bill Cosby criminal trial and United States-Russia relations.

    Also, each newspaper in the collection features advertisements for more than just university services. One could use these newspaper advertisements to track the history of local Pittsburgh businesses. Some of them are just entertaining in and of themselves and could be used in a larger study of the history of advertising in America. Before there were cell phones, telephone companies rented personal landline phones to students for use at school, and some of their advertisements in the student newspapers were comical. One advertisement in particular compared renting a live chicken to renting a phone, by, of course, emphasizing how comparatively easy it was to rent a phone as opposed to a chicken.

    The kind of archive and collection I’m describing isn’t unique, I’m sure. Not all archives are large A portion of an opinion article against women’s suffrage from the April 1895

    edition of Sorosis. Chatham University Archives & Special Collections.

    An Archive is an Archive No Matter How Small: A Deeper Look into the Treasure Trove of Information in the Archives

    By Emily Ahlin

  • Mid-Atlantic Archivist | 7

    repositories. We are all different shapes and sizes, and our focus might be narrow or wide. Either way, each of us has something unique to offer researchers, and I would venture to say that we can each offer our holdings to more researchers than we think. It’s amazing how many vastly different research topics can be derived from a single archival collection that seems to fit a narrow research scope.

    Whatever institution I end up in after graduation, I hope that continuing to think through how to help more researchers with different topics and increasing access to collections through digitization is how I get to spend my career. As archivists, we hold the keys to accurate histories—all the primary sources. And having an accurate picture of history is one of the most important things we can have as a civilization. To explain using the words of Maya Angelou, “You can’t really know where you are going until you know where you have been.”

    So next time you think to yourself, “Oh, our archive is too specific, it won’t have what they need,” or “Oh, our archive is too small, it won’t have what they need,” think again. There’s so

    much to learn from even the most unlikely places. I can almost imagine Dr. Seuss writing about archives instead of people in his book, Horton Hears a Who: “An archive is an archive no matter how small.”

    Emily Ahlin is a 2019-2020 MARAC Graduate School Archival Education Scholarship recipient.

    Emily Ahlin. Image courtesy of Emily Ahlin.

  • Mid-Atlantic Archivist | 88 | Mid-Atlantic Archivist

    19th Amendment Anniversary

    Votes for Women. Edith Tait Deedrick Photograph Collection of the Socialist Party, ca. 1910-1920, AIS.1978.20, Archives & Special Collections, University of Pittsburgh Library System.

    Calling all MARAC members! As the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th amendment is celebrated across the country, the Communications Committee welcomes members to share their suffrage-related activities on the MARAC social media platforms. Regardless of whether your suffrage-related activities are grand or small, digital or analog, instruction-related or stand alone, your work may help to inspire and ignite ideas in your colleagues. Spread the word on your displays, lectures, coloring pages, or guides that integrate archival materials into the study and celebration of the suffrage movement in the MARAC region. Whether it’s an event that might warrant a little extra promotion or just the benefit of sharing suffrage-related collection materials, MARAC can be a great resource for shining a light on this important anniversary.

    Descriptions, photos, and results from suffrage anniversary programs may be shared via the MARAC Twitter feed (@MARACtweets), the MARAC Facebook group, or even be

    expanded for a longer post on the MARAC Blog! If you’re interested in sharing stories about your suffrage-related programs, feel free to tag us in your tweets or reach out to the Communications Committee via email at [email protected] With more than 600 members in the Facebook group and hundreds more followers on Twitter, this is the perfect opportunity to share your efforts and accomplishments relating to the celebrations surrounding the 19th amendment’s 100th anniversary and its continuing legacy. We look forward to hearing about what’s happening in the region!

  • 9 | Mid-Atlantic Archivist

    When arriving at MARAC Fall 2020 in historic Long Branch, N.J., you will be following in the footsteps of the rich and famous, as well as seven presidents of the United States. From the 1830s to the 1920s, Long Branch was home to the vacation cottages of notables from the business and political worlds while also being an entertainment resort.

    Around 1830, steamboat service to the New Jersey coast became a convenient mode of transportation from the financial center of New York City with Long Branch accessible in an hour. By the Civil War era, the Elberon section of Long Branch contained many coastal summer cottages inspired by the Villa Norman style popular on the northern coast of France as well as the English Queen Anne style. It was not until the advent of rail service via the New York and Long Branch Railroad in 1860 that the resort blossomed into prominence.

    Mary Todd Lincoln began the presidential period of Long Branch by visiting the resort for 10 days in 1861. In 1869, Ulysses S. Grant established a summer White House at 991 Ocean Avenue when prominent summer residents Moses Taylor, George W. Childs, and George W. Pullman purchased the property and gifted it to Grant. Presidents Hayes, Garfield, Arthur, Harrison, McKinley, and Wilson all followed Grant and spent summer

    vacation time in Long Branch. President James A. Garfield was shot in Washington, D.C., in July 1881 and while attempting to recover from his wounds, asked to be moved to Long Branch that September. Railroad track was hastily laid from the Elberon train depot to Francklyn cottage to help facilitate Garfield’s movement there, where he died on September 19. His funeral service was held at Saint James Chapel, where all seven presidents worshipped. The Chapel is now known as the Church of the Presidents, preserved by the Long Branch Historical Museum Association. The Garfield Tea House, made from the railroad ties that led to Garfield’s cottage, is also on the museum grounds.

    Long Branch attracted a who’s who in the financial and entertainment worlds during the Gilded Age. Financiers Victor Newcomb, James Fisk and Diamond Jim Brady as well as the Guggenheim and Bloomingdale families joined poet Oscar Wilde and actresses Lillie Langtry and Lillian Russell as vacationers in Long Branch. Winslow Homer produced paintings of Victorian women strolling the boardwalk. The resort, with its numerous adult temptations, including gaming casinos, became known as “America’s Monte Carlo.” However, with the onset of Prohibition in 1920, the city fathers decided to follow the letter of the law

    Contiuned on page 20 ▶

    Casino Annex, Ocean Park, Long Branch, N.J. 1905. Glass plate negative. Pach Brothers Photographers Glass Plate Negatives. Monmouth County Historical Association.

    FOLLOWING IN FAMOUS FOOTSTEPS

  • Caucus News

    Mid-Atlantic Archivist | 10

    DELAWARESIGNIFICANT INDUSTRIAL FILM ARCHIVE COMES TO HAGLEYHagley Museum and Library in Wilmington, Del., is pleased to announce the arrival of its largest ever motion picture acquisition—the Cinecraft

    Productions film collection. Founded in 1938, the Cleveland-based Cinecraft is the country’s longest-surviving commercial producer of industrial and sponsored motion pictures, a sector that included thousands of companies at its high point during the mid-20th century. Among the many prominent Cinecraft clients were DuPont, Hercules Powder, Standard Oil of Ohio, Firestone, Goodyear, Bethlehem Steel, Ohio Bell Telephone, General Electric, American Greetings, Carling Brewing, and Republic Steel. A number of well-known actors and celebrities appeared in Cinecraft film projects including Alan Alda, Merv Griffin, Tim Conway, Chet Huntley, and Danny Kaye. Richard Nixon appeared in a Republic Steel film produced by Cinecraft in 1966. Starting in the 1940s, Cinecraft developed and employed a 3-camera production technique that would later become standard for shooting television shows.

    The collection of more than 6,000 film cans and accompanying paper archives is among the most comprehensive collections from an industrial film company in the country. Hagley staff spent six days over two weeks on-site at Cinecraft to prepare the collection for relocation; eventually it filled a 53-foot trailer for shipment to Delaware. Considering its size and complexity, the move went perfectly. Digitization has already begun, with films anticipated to begin going into the Hagley Digital Archives by mid-year. The entire effort is expected to last a decade.

    Caucus Representative Diane E. Bockrath (302) 658-2400 ext. 328 [email protected]

    DISTRICT OF COLUMBIAJANICE RUTH NAMED MANUSCRIPT DIVISION CHIEF Janice E. Ruth has been appointed chief of the Manuscript Division at the Library of Congress. Michelle Light, director of special collections, announced Ruth’s appointment on December 4.

    Ruth has held progressively responsible positions at the Library over the past 38 years. She began as an archives technician and worked as a library technician, manuscript reference librarian, writer-editor, specialist in women’s history and Veterans History Project program officer before becoming assistant chief of the Manuscript Division in 2009.

    As assistant chief and later as acting chief, Ruth oversaw security and facility upgrades, as well as played a pivotal role in important acquisitions, including the papers of Supreme Court Justices Sandra Day O’Connor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Speaker of the House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi, Rep. Patsy T. Mink and journalists Mary McGrory, Nancy Dickerson and Helen Thomas.

    Ruth also initiated an arrearage reduction plan in the Manuscript Division that helped launch a larger Library-wide effort, and she led projects to digitize and provide online access to more than 3.4 million images in dozens of collections, including the papers of 14 presidents, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, Civil War statesmen and military figures, Walt Whitman, Rosa Parks, Sigmund Freud and women’s suffrage leaders and organizations. She also provided leadership as part of the team that launched the Library’s By the People crowdsourcing transcription initiative.

    Earlier in her career, Ruth helped to develop the international encoding standard for archival finding aids, known as Encoded Archival Description.

    Caucus Representative Anne McDonough (202) 516-1363 x309 [email protected]

    Cinecraft Productions set, 1965. Paul Culley (left), Ray Culley (sitting on dolly), and Harry Horrocks (right) with actor Reed Hadley.

  • Mid-Atlantic Archivist | 10 11 | Mid-Atlantic Archivist

    MARYLAND Caucus Representative

    Matthew Testa (667) 208-6661 [email protected]

    NEW JERSEY ESSEX COUNTY PARKS 125TH ANNIVERSARY EVENTSDuring its annual meeting on April 23, the Board of the National Association for Olmsted Parks is scheduled to tour the Archives of the Essex County Park System. Both the meeting and a public symposium on April 24-25 are being hosted by Essex County as part of the celebration of the 125th anniversary of the Essex County Parks. Olmsted’s involvement in the first county parks system began even before it was established in 1895. From 1898 until the 1950s, the Olmsted Brothers firm designed all of the county’s parks and reservations. A related exhibit, curated by the archives staff will be on display at Newark Public Library from April through August. Visit essexcountyparks.org for more information.

    Caucus Representative Donald Cornelius (609) 633-8304 [email protected]

    NEW YORK Caucus Representative

    Katherine Palm (212) 284-7380 [email protected]

    PENNSYLVANIABIG MOVE AT THE AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETYThe Library & Museum of the American Philosophical Society (APS) has received the collections of the David Library of the American Revolution (DLAR). While the DLAR’s originals of the Sol Feinstone Collection of Revolutionary War-centric manuscripts were already at the APS, after the two institutions agreed to partner in 2019 (the David Library becoming the David

    Center for the American Revolution at the APS), moving the rest of its collections to Philadelphia was a crucial step and logistical challenge. There was a wealth of material: 7,000 books, around 100 late 18th century newspaper issues, and the DLAR institutional records. Perhaps the biggest task was how to move and where to put 9,000 reels of microfilm.

    The DLAR was founded in 1959 by Bucks County businessperson and philanthropist Sol Feinstone. Feinstone established the institution at the Washington Crossing Historic Park, and later moved it to his farm on River Road in 1974. He named the library in honor of his grandson, David Golub.

    Over the years, the DLAR collected microfilm so that researchers could access as wide a range of Revolutionary War material in one place as possible. Associate Director of Collections David Gary was named manager of the project, tasked with coordinating with DLAR staff, hiring movers, and overseeing the move. Finding a place to put the 7,000 volumes was a challenge, but what does one do with 9,000 reels of microfilm? Nowhere was there enough wall space for the cases. The environmental conditions in the attic fluctuated too much.

    The solution was to consolidate and relocate some paper records and remove shelves from the freed stacks. Measurements of the microfilm cases proved they would fit, through-shelved, in the freed-up space. The accompanying photograph shows the result.

    Microfilm cases in newly freed storage space at American Philosophical Society.

  • Caucus News

    Mid-Atlantic Archivist | 12

    As part of the agreement with the DLAR, the microfilm will be digitized.

    GRANT UPDATE FROM THE HISTORICAL MEDICAL LIBRARY—COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS OF PHILADELPHIAThe Historical Medical Library is pleased to announce that over 30,000 pages of lecture notes and related material has been digitized to date as part of the “For the Health of the New Nation” grant. “For the Health of the New Nation: Philadelphia as the Center of American Medical Education, 1746-1868” is a two-year project funded by CLIR and organized by the Philadelphia Area Consortium for Special Collections Libraries (PACSCL). The initiative will digitize, describe, and provide access to 140,000 pages of lecture tickets, course schedules, theses, dissertations, student notes, faculty lectures notes, commencement addresses, opening addresses, and matriculation records, sharing not only the voices of the medical greats, but also the often unheard voices of students.

    Some of the highlights included in the first batch of uploads to the Internet Archive include the Samuel Knox notes on lectures from the University of Pennsylvania (1783-1785), a two-volume set of notes on topics such as midwifery, symptoms of pregnancy

    and labor, typical and atypical births, and postnatal care. These volumes are some of the earliest lecture notes in the collection. The Forster family papers (1819-1880) include letters from James H. Stuart to his mother and brother, Benjamin, which concern his training and experiences as a medical student in Philadelphia at the University of Pennsylvania. Check out these and other items digitized as part of the grant here: http://bit.ly/cpp_fhnn, and be sure to follow the Library on Twitter @CPPHistMedLib for future updates!

    PENN STATE OUTREACH INITIATIVESThe Pennsylvania State University Special Collections Library is excited to announce a number of new outreach initiatives in 2020.

    Recent outreach initiatives include the launch of the Judy Chicago Research Portal in collaboration with Schlesinger Library for the History of Women in America at Harvard and the National Museum of Women in the Arts. The Judy Chicago Research Portal aggregates the work of feminist artist Judy Chicago from across all three repositories and provides a gateway for researchers interested in her extensive work in the intersection of visual arts, feminism, and arts education.

    So WHAT ARE YOU DOING ABOUT

    ?That’s our question for you.

    We’re sure you have questions for us.

    Your Researchers want tofind it, request it, see it.

    www.atlas-sys.com/aeon

    HOW WILL AEON HELP US GATHER BETTER,

    MORE MEANINGFUL STATISTICS ON OUR

    COLLECTIONS AND USERS?

    HOW HAVE OTHER INSTITUTIONS MADE THE CASE FOR AEON WHEN THEIR BUDGET

    IS CAPPED OR LIMITED?

    HOW WILL AEON HELP US

    ENHANCE SERVICE?

    HOW IS AEON DIFFERENT THAN

    WHAT WE CAN DO USING OUR VARIOUS

    LOCAL SYSTEMS?

    See us at the MARAC Spring Conference April 16-18, 2020 or email us for the answers to these and other questions about Aeon.

    [email protected]

  • Mid-Atlantic Archivist | 12 13 | Mid-Atlantic Archivist

    The Special Collections Library would also like to announce the re-description and re-publication of a series of finding aids, which aim to help expose the hidden Latinx voices represented by various collections in our archive. Among the new resources which have been made available to researchers are the following: Guide to the Dominican Republic political and cultural publications, Guide to the William T. Sanders papers, Guide to the William T. Sanders collection on Pedro Armillas, and the Guide to the Luis Alberto Sánchez papers (available in English and Spanish).

    Finally, the Special Collections Library is happy to welcome all to the upcoming exhibition “Earth Archives: Stories of Human Impact” which will open on April 2, 2020 and run through December 20, 2020. The exhibition will include many varied materials: a manuscript diary of detailing glaciers encountered on the Harriman Alaska Expedition of 1899; Suminagashi marbling prints made from polluted waterways by the artist Sto Len; an album of seaweeds collected by women off the English coast in the 19th century as an example of a record of biodiversity; an Earth Day poster from the year of its founding (1970); and the records of Eco Action, a student environmental activist group at Penn State, amongst others.

    NATIONAL MUSEUM OF INDUSTRIAL HISTORYThe National Museum of Industrial History (NMIH) kicked-off a month-long commemoration of the 100th Anniversary of Women’s Suffrage in March with International Women’s Weekend on March 7-8. Women’s Weekend celebrated the voices and stories of women in industry through a full schedule of youth educational activities, guided tours and exhibit enhancements, live historical reenactments, Girl Scout badge programs, film screenings, and lectures.

    Speaker highlights included “Packaging with PEEPS®!,” a presentation with Charlotte Edwards, a senior packaging engineer at Just Born that detailed how America’s favorite marshmallow chicks go from the factory to the consumer, as well as “Changing Lives,” a look at women in industry with Lisa Jane Scheller, the chairman and president of Silberline Manufacturing Co., Inc. Other guests included Dr. Louise Krasniewicz of the University of Pennsylvania’s Department of Anthropology who discussed Emma Allison, a 19th century steam engineer who made headlines in 1876, and Constance Thompson, the senior director of Women’s Engagement at the National Manufacturing Institute.

    UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH LIBRARY SYSTEM NEWSThe University of Pittsburgh’s Library System will present The Homestead Steel Strike and the Growth of America as an Industrial Power, an NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture workshop that will be hosted in Pittsburgh July 12-18

    and July 19-25.

    Presented by the Archives & Special Collections Department at the University of Pittsburgh Library System and Rivers of Steel National Heritage Area, the goal of The Homestead Steel Strike and the Growth of America as an Industrial Power is to provide teachers with a full accounting of the circumstances that led to the Battle of Homestead and what its lasting impact has been in the United States. This program will provide a framework for participants to immerse themselves in the battle from both sides by examining primary sources related to Carnegie and Frick’s business practices, worker conditions, the direct aftermath of the battle, and what came in later years as U.S. business took stock of the relationship between management and labor. The availability of pertinent online resources through the University of Pittsburgh’s Library System will ensure that teachers will be able to bring home to their schools what they have discovered.

    For more information: homesteadstrike.library.pitt.edu.

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  • Caucus News

    Mid-Atlantic Archivist | 14

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    “ We don’t have the server capacity to run the application, or our IT department doesn’t want to deal with it.”

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    VALERIE METZLER ARCHIVIST/HISTORIAN CELEBRATES 35 IN BUSINESSValerie Metzler Archivist/Historian is celebrating 35 years in private practice this year. Begun in Evanston, Ill., in 1985, the business moved to rejoin MARAC in 1994 and has been based in Altoona since 1998.

    Caucus Representative David Grinnell (412) 648-3243 [email protected]

    VIRGINIA Caucus Representative

    Jessica Johnson (804) 628-2548 [email protected]

    WEST VIRGINIA Caucus Representative

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  • Mid-Atlantic Archivist | 14 15 | Mid-Atlantic Archivist

    Diversity and Inclusion Session Scholarship DebutsBy Josué Hurtado

    The Diversity and Inclusion Committee is excited to announce the new Diversity and Inclusion Session Scholarship.

    This scholarship was created to promote and support program sessions that center on issues of inclusion, diversity, and social justice. The presenters of the winning session will be eligible for a collective total of up to $1,200, paid up-front for travel expenses, two nights hotel, and complimentary registration. First-time presenters and new and student members are strongly encouraged to apply.

    This Session Scholarship will be awarded for one session at each conference. The winning session must be dedicated to addressing issues of inclusion and diversity within the archival profession. Anyone submitting a session proposal will have a chance to indicate on the submission form if they would like their proposal to be considered for this award.

    Proposals should draw explicit and well-articulated connections between archival topics and issues of inclusion, diversity, and social justice. The winning session will be chosen by the Diversity and Inclusion Committee from among the proposals submitted and accepted by the conference Program Committee, using criteria set out in an award selection rubric.

    Winners will be required to submit their anticipated expenses and signed commitment that they intend to present at the conference so that the MARAC treasurer may disperse the funds before the conference.

    The MARAC Steering Committee established the Diversity and Inclusion Committee in 2017. Membership voted to approve the committee by an amendment to the Bylaws in 2018. The committee facilitates, sponsors, and promotes diversity and inclusiveness within the archival profession in general, and the meetings and activities of MARAC particularly.

    As chair of the Diversity and Inclusion Committee, I would be glad to answer any questions anyone may have about this session scholarship, the application process, or any other question that may arise. You may email me at [email protected] Please help spread the word and consider applying.

  • Mid-Atlantic Archivist | 16

    Congress Park, Saratoga Springs, view toward gate. 1916. Lantern slide. A3045-78_A10065. New York State Archives.

    WE'LL SEE YOU NEXT APRIL IN

    Saratoga Springs! APRIL 8-10, 2021

    MARAC SPRING 2021

    WWW.MARAC.INFO/SPRING-2021-CONFERENCE

  • 17 | Mid-Atlantic Archivist

    VOLUNTEER TO SERVE ON A MARAC COMMITTEEBy Jennie Levine Knies, Chair-elect

    Are you looking for ways to get more involved and make a difference in our organization? If so, please contact me at [email protected] and volunteer to serve on a MARAC committee! Several non-elected committee positions will be open this spring and summer, and I am on the lookout for energetic and talented MARAC members, especially individuals who have never previously served. Fresh perspectives from people like you keep our organization vibrant and meaningful to all members.

    The time commitment required varies quite a bit from one position to another and not all appointments require regular meeting attendance. Just let me know your interests and availability, and we can likely find a committee that is the right fit for you. We will need people for:

    • COMMUNICATIONS• DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION• MEETINGS COORDINATING• MEMBERSHIP

    • MENTORING SUBCOMMITTEE• WEB TEAM

    For more information on the work of these specific committees, see www.marac.info/committees and also the MARAC Operations Manual: https://tinyurl.com/w8jqb2c. There are two positions in particular that I should highlight because they require specific skills and a more significant time commitment. Let me know if you think you are the right fit for any of these positions or know someone who is.

    ADVERTISING EDITOR, MID-ATLANTIC ARCHIVISTThe advertising editor serves as a liaison between MARAC and the advertisers appearing in each quarterly issue of the Mid-Atlantic Archivist. For a full description, please see: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1ZZD63HXpJlSL3-WP8dW9WxYjcx1IvGGR

    PARLIAMENTARIANMARAC’s parliamentarian interprets Robert’s Rules of Order and serves as the chair’s advisor and consultant on procedural matters. The parliamentarian attends all regular and special business meetings of MARAC. When requested by the chair, the parliamentarian also attends Steering Committee meetings. For a full description, please see: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1l4mIGaU0W0iec3j6ZqM8RdlLyuzjtquw

    If you have any questions about these positions or any general questions about the appointment process, please do not hesitate to contact me. I look forward to hearing from capable and enthusiastic volunteers like you!

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    Welcome New Members!DECEMBER 2019Belinda Harris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carilion Clinic

    Jenifer Monger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Institute Archives and Special Collections

    Pamela Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Penn State Dickinson Law

    JANUARY 2020Alan Arellano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . University of Maryland

    Bruce Brooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bruce E. Brooks & Associates

    Monica Hurd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Library of Congress

    Taylor Mason . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pennsylvania House of Representatives Archives

    Patrick McCall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Seton Hall University

    Matthew Perelli . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Student

    Nancy Poehlmann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . University at Albany

    Cora Teel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Retired (Marshall University)

    Robert Vay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . George Mason University

    Ashley Williams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hagley Museum and Library

    FEBRUARY 2020Michelle An . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Library of Congress

    Juber Ayala . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Jersey Hispanic Research & Information Center, The Newark Public Library

    Flynn Collins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . University of Pittsburgh

    Lynsey Crantz Allie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Allie Archival Consulting

    Elise DeAndrea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .SUNY Upstate Medical University

    Allison Fischbach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Towson University

    Charles Hosale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Library of Congress - American Folklife Center

    Stacey Lavender . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . University of Virginia

    Maria Leighton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Southern Maryland Studies Center, College of Southern Maryland

    John Marden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . National Archives and Records Administration

    Rachel McNellis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Library of Congress

    Marvin Muhlhausen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yelland Research Library & Archives, Hanover Area Historical Society

    Jennifer Piegols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Salisbury University

    Max Thorn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Queens College, City University of New York

  • (October 1, 2019 to December 31, 2019)

    Treasurer’s Report Fiscal Year 2020, 2nd QuarterFY 2020, 2nd Quarter (October 1, 2019 to December 31, 2019)

    CATEGORY Budget 1st Quarter 2nd Quarter 3rd Quarter 4th Quarter Total % Budget

    INCOMEMembership Dues $41,000.00 $23,781.00 $2,930.00 $26,711.00 65%Conference Registration $90,000.00 $24,198.00 $20,380.00 $44,578.00 50%Conference Vendors $15,000.00 $3,700.00 $5,700.00 $9,400.00 63%Conference Sponsorship $7,000.00 $500.00 $0.00 $500.00 7%Publication Advertising $4,000.00 $1,600.00 $1,256.00 $2,856.00 71%Publication Sales $1,150.00 $45.00 $180.00 $225.00 20%Mailing List Sales $100.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 0%Off-Meeting Workshops $5,500.00 $1,710.00 $285.00 $1,995.00 36%Bank Interest $125.00 $35.52 $34.79 $70.31 56%Investment Interest $2,000.00 $751.43 $438.34 $1,189.77 59%Gifts to Operations $500.00 $305.00 $231.00 $536.00 107%Miscellaneous $0.00 $0.00 $200.00 $200.00 0%

    Total Income $166,375.00 $56,625.95 $31,635.13 $0.00 $0.00 $88,261.08 53%

    EXPENSESAdministrator $20,000.00 $5,857.98 $3,182.71 $9,040.69 45%Web Services $6,000.00 $5,657.40 $0.00 $5,657.40 94%Archivist $1,000.00 $0.00 $1,000.00 $1,000.00 100%Accountant $1,500.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 0%Advocacy $2,870.00 $1,500.00 $0.00 $1,500.00 52%Insurance Policy $1,100.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 0%Phone $650.00 $166.36 $167.14 $333.50 51%Postage $905.00 $349.48 $289.11 $638.59 71%Office Supplies $150.00 $0.00 $62.64 $62.64 42%Food $2,730.00 $546.79 $151.80 $698.59 26%Travel $2,450.00 $1,171.72 $492.02 $1,663.74 68%Equipment $330.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 0%Printing and Design $6,150.00 $0.00 $2,597.55 $2,597.55 42%Conference $108,000.00 $1,922.81 $74,133.28 $76,056.09 70%Lodging $2,540.00 $417.89 $725.66 $1,143.55 45%Honoraria $2,500.00 $0.00 $1,200.00 $1,200.00 48%Awards and Prizes $1,300.00 $0.00 $575.00 $575.00 44%Scholarships $0.00 $0.00 $1,000.00 $1,000.00 0%Banking Fees $6,000.00 $1,483.98 $2,214.38 $3,698.36 62%Investments $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 0%Disaster Assistance $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 0%Miscellaneous $200.00 $0.00 $245.00 $245.00 123%

    Total Expenses $166,375.00 $19,074.41 $88,036.29 $0.00 $0.00 $107,110.70 64%

    Net Income or (Loss) $37,551.54 ($56,401.16) $0.00 $0.00 ($18,849.62)

    Account Balances Opening Credits Debits ClosingPNC Checking $64,923.93 Operating $37,551.54 $31,635.13 ($88,036.29) ($18,849.62)PNC Savings $76,695.06 Restricted $142,805.00 $196.00 ($2,209.64) $140,791.36Vanguard Bonds $85,527.03 Reserve $58,231.25 $0.00 $0.00 $58,231.25Total $227,146.02 Surplus $46,724.84 $0.00 $0.00 $46,724.84

    Totals $285,312.63 $31,831.13 ($90,245.93) $226,897.83

    Summary - Second Quarter FY 2020Opening Balance $285,312.63Total Income $31,831.13Total Expenses ($90,245.93)Closing Balance $226,897.83

    Restricted Funds Opening New Gifts Spending ClosingPNC Savings $55,264.33 Disaster Assist. $13,393.00 $161.00 $0.00 $13,554.00Vanguard Bonds $85,527.03 Education $122,561.00 $25.00 ($959.64) $121,626.36Total $140,791.36 Graduate Schol $1,255.00 $5.00 ($1,000.00) $260.00

    Finch Award $5,596.00 $5.00 ($250.00) $5,351.00Total $142,805.00 $196.00 ($2,209.64) $140,791.36

  • Mid-Atlantic Archivist | 20

    IMAGE CREDITS

    FRONT COVER IMAGEJohnston, Francis, Benjamin. “Cragston,” John Pierpont Morgan house, Highland Falls, New York. Spring bulbs. ca. 1913. Glass lantern slide. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. http://www.loc.gov/. 13 March 2020.

    FRONT COVER, TOP LEFTHarris & Ewing. May Day flowers for First Lady. May 1938. Glass plate negative. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. http://www.loc.gov/. 16 March 2020.

    FRONT COVER, BOTTOM RIGHTHighsmith, Carol M. The Japanese Lantern is a stone statue in West Potomac Park. Washington, D.C. [between 1980 and 2006]. Color transparency. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. http://www.loc.gov/. 13 March 2020.

    BACK COVER, LEFT TO RIGHTJohnston, Francis, Benjamin. “Lyndhurst,” Finley Johnson Shepard house, 635 South Broadway, Tarrytown, New York. Spring bloom. ca. 1914. Glass lantern slide. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. http://www.loc.gov/. 16 March 2020.

    Highsmith, Carol M. View of Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, one of the premier horticultural display gardens in the United States. 2019. Digital tiff file. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. http://www.loc.gov/. 16 March 2020.

    Harris & Ewing. Washington youngsters surprise Mrs. Coolidge with May Day basket of flowers. April 1927. Glass plate negative. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. http://www.loc.gov/. 16 March 2020.

    PAGE 15People vector created by pikisuperstar - www.freepik.com

    “Following in Famous Footsteps” Contiuned from page 9

    and eliminated vice, causing an exodus of the rich and famous to more permissive resorts. The mansions began to disappear, and Long Branch evolved into a vacation destination for the masses. The new Garden State Parkway not only spread the tourist crowd further south, it also encouraged commuters to take advantage of the easy accessibility to New York and northern New Jersey and make their year-round homes in Long Branch.

    The northern shore area is notable for its contributions to literature, music and pop culture. Writers and activists Dorothy Parker and Norman Mailer were born in Long Branch as was rock legend Bruce Springsteen, who wrote all eight songs for the 1975 album Born to Run while staying at a house on West End Court. HBO’s The Sopranos filmed on location twice in Long Branch, including once at our host hotel, the Ocean Place Resort.

    You are invited to follow these famous footsteps and explore the history of this legendary shore resort while attending MARAC Fall 2020 on October 22-24. The autumn ambience of the northern Jersey shore and the Ocean Place Resort in Long Branch is sure to please. Visit the conference web page at https://marac2020longbranch.wordpress.com or contact the LAC co-chairs, Tara Maharjan or Melissa Ziobro at [email protected] or [email protected] for more information.

  • EditorJodi Boyle

    Associate EditorMelissa Nerino

    TIME VALUE MAIL

    Dickinson CollegeP.O. Box 1773Carlisle, PA 17013

    ISSN 0738-9396The Mid-Atlantic Archivist (MAA) is the quarterly newsletter of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Archives Conference (MARAC). MARAC membership includes interested individuals who live and work in Delaware, the District of Columbia, New Jersey, New York, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. MARAC seeks to promote the professional welfare of its members; to effect cooperation among individuals concerned with the documentation of the human experience; to enhance the exchange of information among colleagues working in the immediate regional area; to improve the professional competence of archivists, curators of textual, audio-visual and related special research collections, and records managers; and to encourage professional involvement of those actively engaged in the acquisition, preservation, bibliographic control and use of all types of historical research materials.

    Individual annual membership dues are $45. The dues year runs from July 1 through June 30. Membership is not open to institutions, but institutions may purchase subscriptions to MAA at $45 per year.

    Membership applications should be addressed to:MARAC Dickinson College, P.O. Box 1773, Carlisle, PA 17013;Phone: (717) 713-9973; Email: [email protected] http://www.marac.info/membership

    Deadlines are March 1, June 1, September 1, and December 1.

    Advertising rates and requirements may be obtained from Melissa Nerino, Associate Archivist, Industrial Archives & Library, 18 West Fourth Street, Bethlehem, PA 18015, 610-868-1115, [email protected]