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Transcript of FOX - Notice Animated Posters.pdf · PDF fileThe fox has a thick red-brown coat with...

  • PROTECT OUR WILDLIFE PLEASE DO NOT LITTER

    SIONNACHFOX

    Vulpes vulpes

    ENFO17 St. Andrew Street, Dublin 2. LoCall: 1890 200 191 Tel: (01) 888 3911 / (01) 888 3933Email: [email protected]: www.enfo.ie

    ENFO17 Srid San Aindrias, Baile tha Cliath 2.LoCall: 1890 200 191 Teil: (01) 888 3911 / (01) 888 3933R.phost: [email protected]: www.enfo.ie

    The Fox has been with us for a long, long time. Throughout the years, he has been hunted by man,but, because he is an intelligent animal, he has been able to survive all the trapping, hunting andshooting. The fox is still very common all over this country. You may not have seen these handsomeanimals because they usually spend the daylight hours sleeping, only coming out to hunt when itgets dark. The fox has a thick red-brown coat with white underparts and a long white-tipped tail orbrush. He and the female fox (a vixen) live in an earth or underground burrow. Sometimes they

    occupy a badgers sett or a rabbits burrow. The badgers neat home is soon turned into a bit of amess by the untidy fox family! In April, three to six cubs are born. Foxes are very good parents. Unlikesome other wild animals, the dog-fox is an excellent father. He provides food for the vixen and hercubs and helps his mate to rear the family. The cubs begin to leave home in the late summer. Theysoon go their own separate ways, for foxes are solitary animals and prefer to be on their own. Foxesdo a very important job of controlling the numbers of pests like rats and mice.

    The little stars on this maprepresent the distribution

    of Foxes throughout Ireland. Each square on the map is

    equivalent to 100 kilometresby 100 kilometres.

    INFORMATION ON THE ENVIRONMENT

    FOXSIONNACH

    Vulpes vulpes

  • IORA RUARED SQUIRREL

    Sciurus vulgaris

    PROTECT OUR WILDLIFE PLEASE DO NOT LITTERENFO17 St. Andrew Street, Dublin 2. LoCall: 1890 200 191 Tel: (01) 888 3911 / (01) 888 3933Email: [email protected]: www.enfo.ie

    ENFO17 Srid San Aindrias, Baile tha Cliath 2.LoCall: 1890 200 191 Teil: (01) 888 3911 / (01) 888 3933R.phost: [email protected]: www.enfo.ie

    Everyone loves the Red Squirrel because of the colour of its coat and beautiful big tail. These prettylittle creatures like to live in coniferous (or cone-bearing) woodlands. Squirrels are wonderfulacrobats, scampering up and down the tree and jumping from branch to branch. The male squirrelbuilds a big nest or drey in the tree and it is a cosy home for his family. The drey is made of twigs,leaves, mosses and bark. Squirrels do not hibernate in the winter but they avoid the cold and wetweather. They like a good sleep but they wake up if the weather improves. A squirrel eats nuts,

    acorns, pine seeds, fungi and berries. During the autumn, this food is stored away for winter use,carefully hidden in holes or hollows. But the forgetful creatures often cant remember where theyput the hidden food!There are also a large number of Grey Squirrels in this country. They were originally brought overhere from North America. Grey squirrels are bigger than our native red squirrels and can eat moretypes of food and so are replacing reds in many areas.

    The little stars on this map representthe distribution

    of Red Squirrels throughout Ireland.Each square on the map is

    equivalent to 100 kilometres by 100kilometres. INFORMATION ON

    THE ENVIRONMENT

    RED SQUIRRELIORA RUA

    Sciurus vulgaris

  • DOBHARCHOTTER

    Lutra lutra

    PROTECT OUR WILDLIFE PLEASE DO NOT LITTERENFO17 St. Andrew Street, Dublin 2. LoCall: 1890 200 191 Tel: (01) 888 3911 / (01) 888 3933Email: [email protected]: www.enfo.ie

    ENFO17 Srid San Aindrias, Baile tha Cliath 2.LoCall: 1890 200 191 Teil: (01) 888 3911 / (01) 888 3933R.phost: [email protected]: www.enfo.ie

    Not very many people have seen an otter. This is a pity, for it is one of our most graceful and attractive animals. Lookinglike an overgrown stoat, the otter has a long body and tail and short legs. It is a semi-aquatic creature, equally at homeon land or in the water. The otter is a wonderful swimmer with a body perfectly suited to underwater activity. Its coatis waterproof and with webbed toes and a long tail for a rudder, it can swim effortlessly in search of prey, such as coarsefish, eels and frogs, etc. Large lungs enable it to take a deep breath which keeps it going under the water for threeminutes or more. Out of the water, an otter will hunt for rabbits, mice, voles and birds. Otters live near water, besidelakes, rivers and streams. They make a home called a holt in a bank with the entrance under the water or it may be in

    an old rotten tree-stump. The mother otter has a litter of one to three whelps which are born blind. the babies remainin the holt for about eight weeks after birth and both parents hunt to feed them. After this period, the whelps aretaught to swim. The strange thing is that they are not too keen to take to the water. They have to be coaxed to followthe mother otter across shallow water. Sometimes the babies have to pushed down the river bank. Once in the water,they soon become expert at catching their own food. Otters are very playful and even when they are fully grown, theylove to slide down muddy banks into the water. Otters are a protected animal but are often harmed by water pollution,so make sure to never pollute water.

    OTTERDOBHARCH

    The little stars on this maprepresent the distribution

    of Otters throughout Ireland. Each square on the map is

    equivalent to 100 kilometresby 100 kilometres.

    INFORMATION ON THE ENVIRONMENT

  • LUCH FHIRFIELD MOUSE

    Apodemus sylvaticus

    PROTECT OUR WILDLIFE PLEASE DO NOT LITTERENFO17 St. Andrew Street, Dublin 2. LoCall: 1890 200 191 Tel: (01) 888 3911 / (01) 888 3933Email: [email protected]: www.enfo.ie

    ENFO17 Srid San Aindrias, Baile tha Cliath 2.LoCall: 1890 200 191 Teil: (01) 888 3911 / (01) 888 3933R.phost: [email protected]: www.enfo.ie

    The Field Mouse is one of our prettiest little animals. It has a coat of brown and white fur with anorange spot on the chest. This tiny, timid creature has a long tail, large oval ears and huge short-sighted eyes. In spite of its name, it can also be found in hedgerows, scrub, woods and even sand-dunes. Field Mice sleep during the day and move around at night. They are very active animals,running, hopping and climbing, always on the look-out for seeds, berries, nuts and insects. They liketo save food and sometimes they scramble up a tree to use an old birds nest as a food store. TheField Mouse makes a burrow about three feet below the surface. This burrow has three entrances.

    The breeding nest is made of shredded grass and is found at the end of the burrow. The mother FieldMouse produces a litter of four to eight babies and she may have three or more litters in one year.The young are born blind and they open their eyes in about a fortnight. They remain in the familyburrow even when they are fully-grown, sharing it with brothers and sisters and other relatives. FieldMice have good reason to be nervous for they have many enemies such as cats, dogs, stoats, foxesand crows. Field Mice do not hibernate although they are less active in the winter. They have the foodwhich they stored in burrows or holes during Autumn.

    The little stars on this maprepresent the distribution of

    Field Mice throughout Ireland. Each square on the map is

    equivalent to 100 kilometres by 100 kilometres.

    INFORMATION ON THE ENVIRONMENT

    FIELD MOUSELUCH FHIR

    Apodemus sylvaticus

  • EASGSTOAT

    Mustela erminea

    PROTECT OUR WILDLIFE PLEASE DO NOT LITTERENFO17 St. Andrew Street, Dublin 2. LoCall: 1890 200 191 Tel: (01) 888 3911 / (01) 888 3933Email: [email protected]: www.enfo.ie

    ENFO17 Srid San Aindrias, Baile tha Cliath 2.LoCall: 1890 200 191 Teil: (01) 888 3911 / (01) 888 3933R.phost: [email protected]: www.enfo.ie

    The Irish stoat is an elegant little animal with a long slender body and neck, short legs and a black-tipped tail.Many people call it a weasel but there are not weasels in Ireland. Its coat is reddish-brown above with white oryellowish underparts. Stoats live in woods, high moorland, mountains and open country where there are walls,hedges and ditches. Like other furry animals, stoats spend a lot of daylight hours sleeping, emerging at night tohunt. However, they can sometimes be seen frolicking in the sunshine, jumping dancing, turning somersaults andwriggling like a snake. Although stoats are so playful, they are very skilled and fierce killers! They will attack rats,mice, birds, leverets and animals such as rabbits which are much bigger than themselves. When confronted by a

    stoat, a rabbit is often so terrified that it becomes paralysed with fear and may even die of fright! Because theydestroy huge numbers of rodents in this way, stoats are much more beneficial than harmful. The stoat itself hasenemies such as owls, foxes, cats, dogs and people who tend poultry and game. Stoats breed once a year, motherstoat producing a litter in March/April. The stoat nursery may be a hold in a bank, a hollow tree trunk, a rockcrevice or a rabbits burrow. There may be up to ten babies in a litter, blind for the first nine days. They developvery quickly and, in no time at all, they can follow their mother when she goes hunting. Stoats are very inquisitiveanimals and, if anything catches their attention, they will stand upright folding their paws over their chests.

    The little stars on this maprepresent the distribution

    of Stoats throughout Ireland. Each square on the map is

    equivalent to 100 kilometresby 100 kilometres.

    INFORMATION ON THE ENVIRONMENT

    STOATEASGMustela erminea

  • GRINNEOGHEDGEHOG

    Erinaceus europaeus

    PROTECT OUR WILDLIFE PLEASE DO NOT