Ensuring quality in blended

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Presented at Sloan-C Blended, Milwaukee, WI, July 8th, 2013 With the increase in the diffusion of blended and online programming across higher educational institutions, stakeholders are looking for ways to ensure the quality of the student experience. Quality of blended programs can be ensured through faculty and instructional development and training, faculty and instructor evidence of competence and recognition for excellence, constructive evaluation and feedback on blended and online course design and delivery, and community-building opportunities among instructors and staff. Blended learning is becoming a prominent mode of programming and delivery in education. It is swiftly emerging and transforming higher education to better meet the needs of our students providing them with more effective learning experiences. This movement is leading to a renovation in the way courses are taught and programs support their students. Instructional and faculty development provides the core foundation to institutional programming in providing a framework for implementing blended and online learning pedagogy in the classroom. This student-centered, active learning pedagogy has the potential to alter the traditional classroom by enhancing course effectiveness through increased interactivity leading to superior student outcomes. A recent study reported that "Respondents ... anticipated that the number of students taking online courses will grow by 22.8% and that those taking blended courses will grow even more over the next 2 years" (Picciano, Seamen, Shea, & Swan, 2012, p. 128). As the demand for blended learning opportunities increases, so does the need for development of instructors to teach and design blended courses and mechanisms to ensure the quality of courses and programs. The University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee (UWM) has been providing instructional development and blended learning opportunities to students for over a decade. Since 2001, UWM has developed 8 blended degree programs. In the fall of 2012, UWM offered approximately 100 blended courses and enrolled 7,655 students (26%) in at least one blended course. UWM continues to see growth, as the nation does, and continues to provide opportunities for students to best meet their needs.

Transcript of Ensuring quality in blended

  • 1.Ensuring Quality in Blended Courses Through Faculty Development and Engagement July 8, 2013 - 8:30am, Lakeshore A Dylan Barth, Tanya Joosten, and Nicole Weber Learning Technology Center, LTC@uwm.edu University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

2. Overview Introduction to UWM and Blended Overview of activity Blend13.wikispaces.com Breakout discussion Reporting out Conclusions 3. Introductions 4. University of Wisconsin -Milwaukee Dylan Barth, djbarth@uwm.edu Tanya Joosten, tjoosten@uwm.edu Nicole Weber, nicolea5@uwm.edu Gerry Bergtrom, Matt Russell, Bara Omari, and Megan Haak 5. About us 6. TechEnhanced Blended Online Traditional Self-paced MOOCs Flex Faculty development programs and pedagogical consultation Technology training and support Evaluation and research The LTC provides faculty development and pedagogical consultation, technology training and support, and evaluation and research of an array of course delivery modes, including tech enhanced, blended, and online. What we do? 7. Delivery modes TechEnhanced Blended Online Traditional Self-paced MOOCs Flex Content Text Images Audio Video Interactivity Discussions Groups Feedback Assessment Written and oral examination Discursive Portfolio Pedagogical considerations For each delivery mode, there are pedagogical considerations to be made with regard to content delivery, interactivity, and assessment. The UWMLTC faculty development program and pedagogical consultations with our team guide instructors in making decisions about these considerations. 8. About UWM 9. blended learning is growing 10. What is blended? 11. Hybrid (blended) courses are courses in which a significant portion of the learning activities have been moved online, and time traditionally spent in the classroom is reduced but not eliminated (Aycock, Garnham, and Kaleta, March, 2002, para. 1). 12. Blended learning: 1) courses that integrate online with traditional face-to-face class activities in a planned, pedagogically valuable manner; and, 2) where a portion (institutionally defined) of face-to-face time is replaced by online activity (Picciano, 2006, p. 97). 13. What is blended for UWM? 14. Web-enhanced 0 - 20% Blended 21 - 99% Online 100% Blended 1 21 - 50% Online with commensurate reduction in seat time Blended 3 81 - 99% Online with commensurate reduction in seat time Blended 2 51 - 80% Online with commensurate reduction in seat time 15. Why does your campus need to define blended? Who needs to be involved in defining blended for your campus? What is blended? How is it different from face-to- face? online? others? Where will the definition live? How will it be communicated to the community? 16. Why teach blended? 17. What are we doing today? 18. Blend13.wikispaces.com 1.) Login or create an account 2.) Request access to the wiki to edit 19. 1. How do you foster faculty awareness and interest in blended teaching? How do you motivate faculty to design effective blended courses that include pedagogical or technological innovation? What incentives are in place for course redesign? 20. 2. What makes for an effective blended learning model? What opportunities should be available to help instructors learn effective practices in design and delivery of blended courses? What experiences should be provided to faculty to effectively teach blended courses? How can you develop a community of blended practitioners on campus? 21. 3. How will instructors know when they are providing quality blended courses? How will faculty, programs, or the campus know whether the course was a good course? What tools or services could be provided for evaluating the effectiveness of blended courses? How will quality be communicated to the larger campus (e.g., students, faculty, administration, etc.) ? 22. Reporting out 23. 1. How do you foster faculty awareness and interest in blended teaching? How do you motivate faculty to design effective blended courses that include pedagogical or technological innovation? What incentives are in place for course redesign? 24. The Information Technology Policy Committee encourages divisions and individual departments to ensure that their tenure, promotion, and merit processes value innovative forms of publication, research, and teaching 25. 2. What makes for an effective blended learning model? What opportunities should be available to help instructors learn effective practices in design and delivery of blended courses? What experiences should be provided to faculty to effectively teach blended courses? How can you develop a community of blended practitioners on campus? 26. UW-Milwaukee Faculty Development Program: Purpose | Format | Outcomes 27. Overall purpose or goals Design, develop, teach, and advocate for blended courses A practical approach Get started Redesign course Develop course material Acquire teaching skills 28. Program format Taught in a blended format and in multiple formats during the academic year Face-to-face meetings and online assignments Model good blended practices Experience blended course as a student Effective teaching model Experienced blended teachers are program facilitators 29. Program Structure F2F 1 2.5 hrs Online 1 F2F 2 2.5 hrs Online 2 F2F 3 2.5 hrs Showcase 2.5 hrs Post- Program 30. Program activities Presentation, demonstration, small-group activities, facilitator feedback, peer feedback, online discussion, consultation Emphasis on faculty active learning Discussing Questioning Developing 31. Main Program Outcomes 1. Start of a redesigned course 2. New teaching skills and knowledge 3. Re-examine both face-to-face and online component 4. Faculty know what to expect 5. Faculty get their questions answered 32. The 10 questions 1. As you think about your course redesign, which of your course objectives might be met more successfully online than in a traditional face-to- face classroom? In consequence, what new learning activities do you think you might introduce into your course? 2. Since you will be reducing seat time partially or wholly in your course, you need to identify alternative ways to deliver course content. Think about a specific topic that you usually present to your face-to-face class. How might you make that portion of your course content available online? 3. Traditional testing is not the only way to assess your students work in an online environment. What other means of assessing or documenting student learning might you decide to use online? see professorjoosten.blogspot.com for the full 10 questions or visit hybrid.uwm.edu 33. Ten questions Online vs. F2F - Integration Designing learning modules Decision rubric for content choices Learning objects Course Content Progressive/summative Before, during, and after Self evaluation Peer evaluation Student evaluation Course Evaluation Rubrics CATs Templates Traditional formats Assessment Plan Synchronous/asynchronous Establishing voice Discussion forums Small groups Online Learning Community Managing expectations Time management Technology support Helping Your Students Staying organized Managing workload Avoiding course and a half Course Management Course Redesign Transitioning to blended teaching 34. Program evaluation Progressive & summative Classroom assessment techniques Reality check survey Anonymous survey at end of program Ongoing Queries from instructors Follow-up interactions Formal debriefings Certificate Program for Online and Blended 35. Eight lessons weve learned 1. Incentives & time for participation 2. Participants with prior experience using technology 3. Blended format for faculty development program 4. Involve experienced blended teachers as facilitators 5. Plenty of time for participant interaction (face-to-face) 6. Provide regular, fast, and positive feedback 7. Focus on pedagogy (redesign conversations) more than technology (support solutions) 8. Open door policy: Provide continuous support and maintain contact 36. Eight ongoing challenges 1. Identification of blended courses 2. Quality control of courses 3. Certification of participants 4. Workload issues 5. Cohorts and stragglers 6. Following up & measuring success 7. Working with math, computing, engineering, and the natural sciences 8. Scalability 37. Online and Blended Teaching Group (OBTG) User-driven, monthly meetings for sharing questions, concerns, and resources Demonstrations, presentations, discussions Online community of instructors 38. 3. How will instructors know when they are providing quality blended courses? How will faculty, programs, or the campus know whether the course was a good course? What tools or services could be provided for evaluating the effectiveness of blended courses? How will quality be communicated to the larger campus (e.g., students, faculty, administration, etc.) ? 39. Faculty Development Resources 40. Peer Evaluation Handbook 41. Student Evaluation Data Enter slides 42. Certification Program 43. Communicating Quality 44. Conclusions Blend13.wikispaces.com