Enhancing Mathematics Teacher Educators' Technological ... Enhancing Mathematics Teacher Educators'...

Click here to load reader

  • date post

    22-Oct-2020
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    0
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of Enhancing Mathematics Teacher Educators' Technological ... Enhancing Mathematics Teacher Educators'...

  • Enhancing Mathematics Teacher Educators' Technological Pedagogical

    Content Knowledge through Collaborative Professional Development:

    Ethiopia

    by

    Seyum Tekeher Getenet

    BEd, MA, MSc

    Submitted in fulfilment of the requirements for the Degree of

    Doctor of Philosophy

    University of Tasmania

    August 2015

  • i

    Declaration of Originality

    This thesis contains no material, which has been accepted, for a degree or diploma by a

    University or any other institution, except by way of background information and duly

    acknowledged in the thesis. To the best of my knowledge and belief, it contains no material

    previously published or written by another person except where due acknowledgement is made

    in the text of the thesis.

    Seyum Tekeher Getenet

    2015

  • ii

    Authority of Access

    This thesis may be made available for loan and limited copying in accordance with the

    copyright Act 1968.

    Seyum Tekeher Getenet

    2015

  • iii

    Statement of Co-Authorship

    The following people and institutions contributed to the publication of work undertaken as

    part of this thesis:

    Paper 1 Seyum Getenet (80%), Kim Beswick (20%)

    University of Tasmania

    Getenet, S., & Beswick, K. (2015). Linking research and practice: Educational design

    research. In S. Fan, & J. Wells (Eds). What is next in educational research? Rotterdam: Sense

    Publishers. [Submitted for publication].

    Details of the Authors’ roles:

    Seyum Getenet contributed to the idea, its formalisation and development.

    Kim Beswick assisted with the refinement and presentation.

    Paper 2 Seyum Getenet (80%), Kim Beswick (15%), Rosemary Callingham (5%)

    University of Tasmania

    Getenet, S., Beswick, K., & Callingham, R. (2015). Conceptualising technology integrated

    mathematics teaching: The STAMP knowledge framework. Proceedings of the 39th Conference

    of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education and the 37th

    Conference of the North American Chapter of the Psychology of Mathematics Education, 13-18

    July, Hobart, Australia, pp. 321-328, ISBN 978-1-86295-829-6.

    Details of the Authors’ roles:

    Seyum Getenet contributed to the idea, its formalisation and development.

    Kim Beswick assisted with the refinement and presentation.

    Rosemary Callingham also assisted in the refinement and presentation

  • iv

    Paper 3 Seyum Getenet (80%), Kim Beswick (20%)

    University of Tasmania

    Getenet, S., & Beswick, K. (2014). Using ICT in teaching a specific mathematics concept:

    Graphs of logarithmic functions. In Liljedahl, P., Nicol, C., Oesterle, S., & Allan, D. (Eds.),

    Proceedings of the 38th Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of

    Mathematics Education and the 36th Conference of the North American Chapter of the

    Psychology of Mathematics Education, 15-20 July, Vancouver, Canada, pp. 153-160. ISBN 978-

    0-86491-363-0 (2014).

    Details of the Authors’ roles:

    Seyum Getenet contributed to the idea, its formalisation and development.

    Kim Beswick assisted with the refinement and presentation.

    Paper 4 Seyum Getenet (75%), Kim Beswick (25%)

    University of Tasmania

    Getenet, S., & Beswick, K. (2013). Measuring mathematics teacher educators' knowledge

    of technology integrated teaching: Instrumental development, Mathematics Education. In V.

    Steinle, L. Ball & C. Bardini (Eds.) Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow. Proceedings of the 36th

    Annual Conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia, 7-11 July

    2013, Melbourne, Victoria, pp. 354-361.

    Details of the Authors’ roles:

    Seyum Getenet contributed to the idea, its formalisation and development.

    Kim Beswick assisted with the refinement and presentation.

  • v

    We the undersigned agree with the above stated, “proportion of work undertaken” for each

    of the above published (or submitted) peer-reviewed manuscripts contributing to this thesis:

    Signed:

    (Professor Kim Beswick) (Associate Professor Karen Swabey)

    Supervisor Head of School

    Faculty of Education Faculty of Education

    University of Tasmania University of Tasmania

    Date: _25 August 2015___________ Date: _____________________

  • vi

    Statement of Ethical Conduct

    “The research associated with this thesis abides by the international and Australian codes

    on human and animal experimentation, the guidelines by the Australian Government's Office of

    the Gene Technology Regulator and the rulings of the Safety, Ethics and Institutional Biosafety

    Committees of the University.”

  • vii

    Abstract

    This study documented the design, development and refinement of a professional

    development program, which improved teacher educators’ knowledge, to facilitate their effective

    use of technology in teaching mathematics. The study was conducted in two Ethiopian Colleges

    of Teacher Education. It involved 16 mathematics teacher educators, four Information

    Communication Technology coordinators, and 247 elementary pre-service mathematics teachers.

    The study was undertaken across three phases. The first phase comprised a contextual and

    problem analysis and development of a conceptual framework based on a literature review that

    provided the basis to design the first professional development program prototype. The second

    phase involved setting out design guidelines and optimising the professional development

    program prototype through two cycles of design, formative refinement and revision. The last

    phase of the study was an evaluation of the extent to which the professional development

    program that took place over 5 months had met its objectives. The study used a mixed methods

    approach, which involved the collection of both quantitative and qualitative data informed by an

    educational design research methodology. Data were collected using questionnaires, observation

    checklists, semi-structured interviews, focus group discussions and professional learning

    workshops.

    One of the findings of the study in the first phase showed that the teacher educators

    believed they had little knowledge of technology and its effective use in their teaching of

    mathematics, and that this was a major barrier resulting in limited technology use in their

    teaching. The first phase of the study informed the design of the professional development

    program in the second phase of the study.

  • viii

    The designed professional development program was characterised by its focus on the

    pedagogical use of technology, provision of exemplar material, the use of available and web-

    based technologies, the formation of teams, support from Information Communication

    Technology (ICT) coordinators, and an emphasis on informality in the professional development

    arrangements. The results in the third phase of the study showed that the professional

    development program contributed to increased use of technology by the mathematics teacher

    educators and their pre-service teachers. The teacher educators’ perceived knowledge of how to

    use and integrate technology teaching practices in their teaching of mathematics was improved

    and this was associated with positive changes in their effective technology integrated

    mathematics teaching as evidenced by the classroom observations.

  • ix

    Dedication

    This thesis is dedicated to my father, Tekeher Getenet, who was everything for my family

    and me. You left fingerprints of grace on my lives. You will be in my heart forever!

  • x

    Acknowledgment

    First, I would like to express my sincere thanks to the University of Tasmania, Faculty of

    Education for giving me a scholarship to undertake this PhD program.

    This thesis would not have been possible without the guidance and the help of several

    individuals who in one way or another contributed their valuable assistance in the preparation

    and completion of this study. I am heartily thankful to my supervisors, Professor Kim Beswick,

    Associate Professor Rosemary Callingham and Dr. Tracey Muir, whose encouragement,

    supervision and support from the preliminary to the concluding level enabled me to develop an

    understanding of the subject. Their intellectual skills, comments, advice, commitments and close

    supervision including introducing me in conferences were quite remarkable towards successful

    completion of my study. My supervisors were also champions in making sure that my social life

    is going well.

    I would like to extend my heartfelt gratitude to participants of this study who generously

    co-operated with me in providing all the necessary information in each step of the study.

    I am highly indebted to Diane Nailon, and Allison Trimble for their tireless efforts to

    ensure that my life at the University of Tasmania was as smooth as possibl