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Transcript of Creating Meaningful Outdoor Experiences Creating Meaningful Outdoor Experiences v ¢¨...

  • Creating Meaningful Outdoor Experiences

    v

    ¨ Cleaning up Great Lakes Areas of Concerns ¨ Preventing and Controlling Invasive Species ¨ Reducing Nutrient Runoff that Contributes to

    Harmful Nuisance Algal Blooms ¨ Restoring Habitat to Protect Native Species

    B-WET PROGRAM

  • G-GOAL Common Unit | Table of Contents

    Contents

    Introduction 1

    Unit organization and sequence 2

    Lesson plans and related materials

    Lesson 1: Introduction to Environmental Stewardship and the Great Lakes 3

    Lesson 2.A: Great Lakes Literacy 7

    Lesson 2.B: Great Lakes Literacy 14

    Lesson 3: Issue Selection 21

    Lesson 4: Background Research 26

    Lesson 5: Outdoor Research to Inventory Invasive Plants in Study Site 31

    Lesson 6: Outdoor Research to Investigate Patterns of Stormwater Runoff 34

    Lesson 7: Outdoor Water Quality Research 40

    Lesson 8: Brainstorming Solutions 63

    Lesson 9: Developing an Action Plan 71

    Lesson 10: Reflect, Share, and Celebrate! 77

    Glossary of terms ​81

  • G-GOAL Common Unit Introduction

    This common unit is intended to provide students with a Meaningful Watershed Educational Experience (MWEE) centered on the Great Lakes Watershed. By the end of the unit, students will implement a stewardship project within their community and will have a better understanding of their role in the Great Lakes Ecosystem.

    These units guide students through the four stages of a Meaningful Watershed Educational Experience. The sequence of a MWEE, outlined by the NOAA Bay Watershed Education and Training (B-WET) Program, is:

    1. Issue definition and background research 2. Outdoor field activities 3. Stewardship action projects 4. Synthesis and conclusions

    Lessons were designed for students in fifth grade through high school. This unit addresses Michigan K-12 Science Standards, developed from the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), and Michigan K-12 Social Studies Standards. Place-based examples of these standards will be supplemented with Great Lakes Literacy Principles and with an emphasis on the four major focus areas of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) Action Plan:

    1. Cleaning up Great Lakes Areas of Concern 2. Preventing and controlling invasive species 3. Reducing nutrient runoff that contributes to harmful/nuisance algal blooms 4. Restoring habitat to protect native species

    Tips on using the lessons:

    ● Many of these lessons will require longer than one class period to complete. Each lesson is arranged by important components of a MWEE rather than by traditional class periods. This unit is intended to span across the whole school year, culminating with a community display of student work to share the impact of their stewardship project.

    ● Student reflection time is intentionally built in throughout many of the lessons. When embarking on a place-based, stewardship-focused unit of study it is crucial to have student buy-in and investment. Dedicating time for students to process the experiences and reflect upon their personal growth and attitude can support these goals.

    Best of luck in your work facilitating student-led environmental stewardship!

    Erin Koren Learning Specialist Grand Rapids Public Museum | ​Be curious. 272 Pearl Street NW Grand Rapids, MI 49504

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  • Unit Organization and Sequence

    MWEE Step 1: Issue Definition and Background Research

    Lesson 1: Introduction to Environmental Stewardship and the Great Lakes

    Lesson 2.A: Great Lakes Literacy

    Lesson 2.B: Great Lakes Literacy

    Lesson 3: Issue Selection

    Lesson 4: Background Research

    MWEE Step 2: Outdoor Field Activities. This second step calls for students to get outside and gather information about the issue they’ve chosen to research. Lessons 5 through 7 are examples of ways to get students outdoors and investigate different focus areas in the Great Lakes Ecosystem. They do not need to be completed in order, and you are encouraged to conduct outdoor field activities related to the issue your students are passionate about.

    Lesson 5: Outdoor Research to Inventory Invasive Plants in Study Site

    Lesson 6: Outdoor Research to Investigate Patterns of Stormwater Runoff

    Lesson 7: Outdoor Water Quality Research

    MWEE Step 3: Stewardship Action Projects

    Lesson 8: Brainstorming Solutions

    Lesson 9: Developing an Action Plan

    MWEE Step 4: Synthesis and conclusions

    Lesson 10: Reflect, share, and celebrate!

    Sequence based on: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association. (2017). Meaningful Watershed Educational Experiences (MWEEs)

    for Students. Retrieved from https://www.noaa.gov/education/explainers/noaa-meaningful-watershed-educational-experience

    2

    https://www.noaa.gov/education/explainers/noaa-meaningful-watershed-educational-experience

  • Lesson 1: Introduction to Environmental Stewardship and the  Great Lakes  Overview 

    This introductory lesson is intended to encourage students to reflect on the uniqueness of the Great  Lakes and on their personal connection to the natural world. This lesson will introduce the term  stewardship ​and ask students to discuss their feelings upon starting a Groundswell unit that will  culminate in a meaningful stewardship project.  

    Curriculum Connections 

    Michigan K-12 Science Standards  ● Earth’s Systems

    ○ MS-ESS2-4. Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth's systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.

    Michigan K-12 Social Studies Standards  ● 6 – G1 .3 .3 Explain the different ways in which places are connected and how those

    connections demonstrate interdependence and accessibility. ● 6 – G5 .1 .3 Identify ways in which human-induced changes in the physical environment in one

    place can cause changes in other places.

    Great Lakes Literacy Principle(s) 

    #1 - The Great Lakes, bodies of fresh water with many features, are connected to each other and to  the world ocean.  #6 - The Great Lakes and humans in their watersheds are inextricably interconnected. 

    Focus Areas of GLRI Action Plan 

    N/A 

    Key Questions 

    ● What is the Great Lakes Ecosystem (GLE)? ● What does it mean to be an environmental steward? ● How are the Great Lakes interconnected?

    Student Objectives 

    ● Students will begin to think about their relationship to their natural environment. ● Students will reflect on their personal responsibility to protect the Great Lakes. ● Students will be able to explain how the Great Lakes are connected to each other and to the

    ocean. ● Students will discuss their pre-existing ideas about stewardship, as well as what they expect

    the Groundswell project to be like.

    Vocabulary 

    Stewardship  Great Lakes Ecosystem 

    Materials List and Setup 

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  • ● Computer ● Projector ● YouTube “Water | Great Lakes in Michigan | Pure Michigan” (0:32)

    https://tinyurl.com/yc6l4rtg ● YouTube “Long Live Summer: Experience the Lake Effect | Pure Michigan” (0:59)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xbtXsORiW_g ● Google map: “Journey to the Atlantic Ocean”

    https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/embed?mid=1QA17L4H_yKYAdyrNAxOQq_bNYarqC7ZT ● Student journals or papers for writing prompt

    Program Activities 

    1. Engage: a. Materials:

    i. Computer ii. Projector iii. YouTube “Water | Great Lakes in Michigan | Pure Michigan” (0:32)

    https://tinyurl.com/yc6l4rtg iv. YouTube “Long Live Summer: Experience the Lake Effect | Pure Michigan”

    (0:59) ​https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xbtXsORiW_g v. Student journals or papers for writing prompt

    b. Procedures: i. Watch the short Pure Michigan videos about the Great Lakes. ii. Discuss: How do you feel after watching these? These types of videos are

    meant to emphasize the special features of our state, most importantly the great fresh water resource of the Great Lakes.

    1. The instructor is encouraged to share a memory about the Great Lakes that is significant to them. Share something that makes you proud to live near the Great Lakes.

    iii. Journal Prompt: 1. Describe the experiences you’ve had with the outdoors growing up and

    any memories surrounding the Great Lakes. 2. What would you say your attitude is toward nature?

    2. Explore: Introduce the path water takes as it moves from the Grand Rapids Public Museum (GRPM) in downtown Grand Rapids all the way through to the Atlantic Ocean!

    a. Materials: i. Computer ii. Projector iii. Google map: “Journey to the Atlantic Ocean:

    https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/embed?mid=1QA17L4H_yKYAdyrNAxOQ q_bNYarqC7ZT 

    b. Procedures: i. This Google Map follows the path of a drop of water through the entire

    journey from falling as precipitation on an urban sidewalk, downtown Grand Rapids, all the way out to the Atlantic Ocean.

    ii. Walk students through the map on a projector. Start with the broad, zoomed out view to show there is an interconnected system all the way from the pavement around us to the Atlantic Ocean! Each stop along the map is numbered and labeled.

    iii. This is intended as an introduction to the interconnectedness of the Great Lakes system