Chap 5-Introduction to E-Business Systems

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Transcript of Chap 5-Introduction to E-Business Systems

1

Introduction to e-Business Systems

McGraw-Hill/Irwin

Copyright 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

2

Section I

Functional Business Systems

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Copyright 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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IT in BusinessBusiness managers are moving from a tradition where they could avoid, delegate, or ignore decisions about IT to one where they cannot create a marketing, product, international, organization, or financial plan that does not involve such decisions.

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Marketing SystemsMarketing Information Systems provide information technologies that support major components of the marketing function. Interactive Marketing Customer focused marketing process Based on using Internet, intranets, & extranets to establish two-way communications between customers or potential customers and the business Customers become involved in product development, delivery, & service issuesMcGraw-Hill/IrwinCopyright 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Marketing Systems (continued)

Targeted marketing Five targeting components Community Content Context Demographic/psychographic Online behavior

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Marketing Systems (continued)

Sales Force Automation The sales force is connected to marketing websites on the Internet, extranets, & the company intranet Increases productivity of sales force Speeds up the capture & analysis of sales data Allows management to provide improved delivery information & better support of the sales force.McGraw-Hill/IrwinCopyright 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Manufacturing Systems

Support the production/operations function Assists firms in planning, monitoring, & controlling inventories, purchases, & the flow of goods and services

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Manufacturing Systems (continued)

Computer-Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) Simplify Automate Integrate Supports the concepts of flexible manufacturing systems, agile manufacturing, & total quality management Computer-Aided Engineering (CAE) Computer-Aided Design (CAD) Material Requirements Planning (MRP)McGraw-Hill/IrwinCopyright 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Manufacturing Systems (continued)

Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) Automate the production process Manufacturing Execution Systems (MES) Performance monitoring systems for factory floor operations

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Manufacturing Systems (continued)

Process Control The use of computers to control an ongoing physical process Machine Control The use of a computer to control the actions of a machine. Also called numerical controlMcGraw-Hill/IrwinCopyright 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Human Resource SystemsHuman Resource Information Systems Support Planning to meet the personnel needs of the business Development of employees to their full potential Recruitment, selection, & hiring Job placementMcGraw-Hill/IrwinCopyright 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Human Resource Systems (continued)

Human Resource Information Systems (continued) Performance appraisals Employee benefits analysis Training and development Health, safety, & security

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Human Resource Systems (continued)

HRM and the Internet Allows companies to process most common HRM applications over their intranets. Allows companies to provide around-theclock services to their employees. Allows companies to disseminate valuable information faster. Allows employees to perform HRM tasks online.McGraw-Hill/IrwinCopyright 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Human Resource Systems (continued)

Staffing Supported by information systems that record and track human resources to maximize their use Training and Development Help human resource managers plan and monitor employee recruitment, training, and development programsMcGraw-Hill/IrwinCopyright 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Accounting Systems

Record and report business transactions and other economic events Online Accounting Systems

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Accounting Systems (continued)

Six widely used accounting systems Order processing Captures & processes customer orders and produces data needed for sales analysis and inventory control Inventory Control Processes data reflecting changes in items in inventory. Helps provide high-quality service while minimizing investment in inventory & inventory carrying costsMcGraw-Hill/IrwinCopyright 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Accounting Systems (continued)

Accounts Receivable Keeps records of amounts owed by customers from data generated by customer purchases and payments Accounts Payable Keeps track of data concerning purchases from, and payments to, suppliers

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Accounting Systems (continued)

Payroll Receives and maintains data from employee time cards and other work records General Ledger Consolidates data received from accounts receivable, accounts payable, payroll, & other accounting information systemsMcGraw-Hill/IrwinCopyright 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Financial Management SystemsSupports financial managers in decisions concerning The financing of the business The allocation & control of financial resources within the business.

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Financial Management Systems (continued)

Major financial management system categories Cash Management Collects information on all cash receipts and disbursements on a real-time or periodic basis

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Financial Management Systems (continued)

Investment Management Helps the financial manager make buy, sell, or hold decisions for each type of security Helps the financial manager develop the optimum mix of securities in order to minimize risk and maximize return

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Financial Management Systems (continued)

Capital Budgeting Involves evaluating the profitability and financial impact of proposed capital expenditures Allows financial managers to analyze longterm expenditure proposals for plant and equipment

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Financial Management System (continued)

Financial Forecasting & Planning Evaluate the present and projected financial performance of the company Help determine financing needs and analyze alternative methods of financing Explore what-if and goal-seeking questions

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Section II

Cross-Functional Enterprise Systems

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Cross-Functional Enterprise ApplicationsIntegrated combinations of information subsystems that share information resources and support business processes across the functional units A strategic way to use IT to share information resources & improve efficiency & effectiveness

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Cross-Functional Enterprise Applications (continued)

Enterprise Application Architecture

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Cross-Functional Enterprise Applications (continued)

Focused on accomplishing fundamental business processes in concert with the companys customer, supplier, partner, & employee stakeholders

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Enterprise Application Integration (EAI)Software enables users to model the business processes involved in the interactions that should occur between business applications. Also provides middleware that Performs data conversion & coordination Provides application communication & messaging services Provides access to the application interfacesMcGraw-Hill/IrwinCopyright 2004, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Enterprise Application Integration (continued)

Business value Integrates front-office and back-office applications to allow for quicker, more effective response to business events and customer demands Improves customer and suppler experience with the business because of its responsiveness.McGraw-Hill/IrwinCopyright 20