Camera shots angles

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Transcript of Camera shots angles

  • CAMERA SHOTSIn this lesson well be learning about the main camera shots and camera angles that are used during filming.

  • A. Camera ShotsThere are 3 main types of shots that describe how near or how far the camera is from the subject:

    Any of these shots can show one subject or more at the same time.

    Long shot. Medium shot. Close-up shot.

  • A Long shot shows the whole subject: an entire boat on the water.

  • a car down the street.

  • The Long shot is used to show the full human figure and provides a clear view of the environment or setting where we find the character.

  • An Establishing long shot This shot will tell the viewer the geographical location of the scene, for example if the scene was inside a house, then the establishing shot might be, the shot of the town or city the house is in, then the shot of the house, then the scene inside the house.

  • A full shot is a variation on the long shot, showing the full subject in the forground, with the feet at the bottom on the frame and the head at the top of the frame.

  • An extreme long shot is used to show landscapes or provide a view of a whole world eg: A city, a town, or even a galaxy where the story is set.

  • 2. A medium shot shows about half of the subject.

  • Medium shot shows the human body from mid-shin or mid-thigh up and is often used to show interaction between two or more characters.

  • A medium shot shows the subject in relation to its immediate surroundings.

  • 3. A close-up only shows one part of the subject, usually in great detail.

  • A close-up or an extreme close-up, would include shots of a persons face, or the paws of a dog walking down a path, of a hand on a doorbell, or a tree branch.

  • In close-ups, we can understand how a character feels; get into the head of that character.

  • Close-ups of things may help to clarify action.

  • B. Camera AnglesIn addition to camera shots, the camera angle is also important. The angle from which a shot is taken is another way to give variety as well as information. High Angle Eye-level Low Angle Reverse Angle Oblique Angle

  • A high angle shot positions the camera above eye-level, looking down on the subject, which consequently appears insignificant, weak, helpless, or small according to how extreme the angle is.

  • Sometimes its just a good angle..

  • At eye level, the impression is neutral.

  • 3. A low angle shot has the camera looking up at the subject, which then appears important, powerful, or domineering, again depending on how exaggerated the angle is.

  • 4. Usually the camera looks at the subject, but with reverse angle the camera shows what the subject is seeing.

  • The most common type of reverse angle it the over the shoulder shot

  • 5. The oblique angle is shot by laterally tilting the camera frame and making the characters or objects look askew.

  • C. Camera MovementAnother way to give television programs and films variety is for the camera to move. Panning Tracking Elevating Dollying Tilting Zooming In/Out

  • 1. Panning: When the camera stays in the same position but turns left or right.

    2. Tracking: When the camera changes its position by moving left or right.

  • 3. Elevating: when the camera changes its position by moving up or down.

    4. Dollying: Changing the cameras position by moving it forward or backward.

  • 5. Tilting: When the camera stays in the same position but turns up or down.

    6. Zooming In/Out: Even when the camera is stationary it can appear to move closer to, or further from, its subject by using a special ring or lever on the lens.