Yiqi Luo, Josep Canadell, and Harold A. Mooney I. Yiqi Luo, Josep Canadell, and Harold A. Mooney

download Yiqi Luo, Josep Canadell, and Harold A. Mooney I. Yiqi Luo, Josep Canadell, and Harold A. Mooney

of 16

  • date post

    28-Sep-2018
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    213
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of Yiqi Luo, Josep Canadell, and Harold A. Mooney I. Yiqi Luo, Josep Canadell, and Harold A. Mooney

  • Yiqi Luo, Josep Canadell, and Harold A. Mooney

    I. Introduction

    There is now a clear understanding of the multiple-driver nature ofglobal change, and the need to address complex and nonlinear responsesas we try to predict the future function and structure of the world' s biomes.Furthermore, as we prepare to meet the demands of the Framework Con-vention on Climate Change, and particularly of the Kyoto Protocol, a soundunderstanding of the carbon cycle at the ecosystem, regional, and globallevel is urgently needed. In this respect, there is a necessity for improvingour knowledge on the temporal and spatial dynamics of sources aDd sinks ofcarbon. It is even more important to understand the controls of source-sinkdynamics and how they may change in the future as global change keepsprogressing (e.g., increase of atmospheric CQ2, N deposition, air temper-ature).

    The effects of carbon dioxide on plants and ecosystems have been exten-sively studied in the past two decades. These studies have provided greatinsights into potential changes in plant and ecosystem functions and struc-ture in the next century when atmospheric CQ2 increases to twice thecurrent CQ2 concentration. How the CQ2 effects on plants and ecosystemsare regulated by stresses has not been carefully examined. In the realworld, rising atmospheric CQ2 concentration is always interacting with otherenvironmental and biological stresses in determining actual changes in

    Copyright @ 1999 by Academic PressAll rights of reproduction in any form reserved.393Carlxm Dioxide and Environmental Stress

  • 394 Yiqi Luo, JoseP Canadell, and Harold A. Mooney

    material and energy fluxes in ecosystems. Itis critical to evaluate the interact-ive responses of plants and ecosystems to rising atmospheric CO2 andenvironmental stress. This chapter summarizes and synthesizes majorknowns and unknowns presented in the chapters compiled in this book.Built upon the synthesis, we propose future research needs in order toimprove our predictive understanding of the interactive effects of risingatmospheric CO2 and environmental stress.

    II. Interactive Effects of Carbon Dioxide and Stresses onPlants and Ecosystems

    Research on CO2 and stress interactions is needed to address one questionin two ways. One is whether or not elevated CO2 ameliorates or exacerbatesenvironmental stresses. The other is how environmental stress moderatesthe direct effect of elevated CO2 on plants and ecosystems. Results fromplant-level studies have suggested that elevated CO2 is likely to amelioratemild drought, salinity, UV-B, and ozone stresses, to exacerbate nutrientstress, and to interact with temperature in a complex fashion. Accordingly,direct effects of elevated CO2 on plants are likely to be amplified undermild drought and salinity stresses but dampened by nutrient stress. At theecosystem scale, we have very limited evidence to suggest one way or anotheron impacts of CO2 and stress interactions because major feedback mecha-nisms have not been evaluated using multifactorial experiments (Table I) .

    A. Water and CO2Extensive experimental data have generally supported a conclusion that

    rising atmospheric CO2 directly reduces stomatal conductance and thentranspiration per unit leaf area ( Chapter 1) .The magnitude of reductionin stomatal conductance varies with species and growth environments, by36% on average for 11 crop and herb species and 23% for 23 tree specieswhen growth CO2 increases from ambient to twice ambient levels. Stomatalconductance is generally reduced more for plants grown in growth cham-bers than in fields utilizing open-top chambers (OTC) or free-air CO2enrichment (FACE) facilities. Reduced stomatal conductance in elevatedCO2 is almost always associated with a decrease in water loss via leaf transpi-ration and an increase in leafwater potential and expansive growth (Chap-ter 1).

    Translation of reduced stomatal conductance and leaf transpiration toplant and canopy levels is complicated by numerous factors, including leafarea growth ( Chapter 1) , root growth, canopy structure and closure, canopywater interception and loss, soil surface evaporation, and species replace-ment (Chapter 2) (Table I) .Elevated CO2 generally results in larger leaves

  • 16. Interactive Effects of Carbon Dioxide and Stress 395

    and higher leaf area growth (Chapter 1) and more root growth (Chapter8) than ambient CO2 does. Increased leaf growth counteracts the reducedstomatal conductance in determining water loss, whereas increased rootgro~ explores more soil water resource. Both lead to more water con-sumption. Interactions of these physical and biological processes are sitespecific, leading to diverse responses of ecosystem hydrological cyclingto elevated CO2. Ecosystem-level measurements indicated that soil watercontent increased in agricultural forb ecosystems and in annual and peren-nial grasslands (Chapters 2 and 10). Results from FACE studies, however,did not indicate much change in soil water content in the elevated CO2plots compared to that in the ambient CO2 plots (Oren et at., 1998) (TableI) .Even if the ecosystem water consumption is similar between the twoCO2 treatments, gross primary productivity is expected to increase in ele-vated CO2 due to increased water use efficiency ( Chapter 1) .Whether ornot net primary productivity will consequently increase in elevated CO2depends on feedback processes of carbon allocation, carbon loss via respira-tion, leaf and root turnover, and carbon use efficiency associated withchanges in nonstructural carbohydrate storage and leaf and root mass perunit area (Luo et at., 1997).

    Chapter 2 pointed out that plot-level studies using OTCs and FACEfacilities may not capture hydrological processes that operate at landscape,regional, and continent scales. These processes include CO'l"inducedchange in regional precipitation, within-continent water cycling betweenthe biosphere and the atmosphere, and planetary boundary layer. Experi-mental studies by manipulating atmospheric CO2 at the landscape or largerscales are beyond our technical capability. It may be a viable, alternativeapproach to analyze long-term watershed hydrological data. Chapter 2analyzed 40-yr watershed hydrological data during the 1956-1996 periodfrom the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in the White MountainNational Forest, New Hampshire, and concluded that watershed evapotrans-piration may have slowed with rising atmospheric CO2 in only one of fiveforested watersheds. That approach deserves more exploration in address-

    ing large-scale, long-term impacts resulting from CO2 and water interac-tions.

    B. Temperature and CQ2

    Temperature affects numerous physiological and ecological processes atseveral hierarchical levels and thus interacts with CO2 in a complex fashion(Chapters 3 and 4). At the biochemical level, temperature regulates mem-brane permeability, enzyme kinetics, synthesis, and stability. For example,

    temperature differentially affects carboxylation and oxygenation kineticsof ribulose-l,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and then

  • ..NOO"CQ

    )ro>Q

    )illJ::-.~cn

    ~'-Q)

    -CroJ::f-cncnQ)'--(/)~EQ

    )Eca'-.>cwa-cnQ)cncaa.cnQ)

    c:EQ)

    "iii>-cnau

    w"Cc~-c~c:~.ccaf-

    ~~0~"'~~e':!.

    ~Ou~~c00-"'~;~

    'A'3"'~~

    ]c:~8.c~~>

    -

    ~~

    o.uo

    ~'tU

    ~~

    ~

    ~

    ~~

    U

    =

    =.Q

    orJ~

    ~

    .~

    N

    =.."

    .-OC

    Q =

    .rJ

    'Q:i .9

    GJ .rJ

    =O

    UG

    J.-U

    ;

    ~

    sci-s0 ~

    0

    =

    .rJ ,0

    U

    .E

    ~

    E rJ'

    i~~

    ';j

    -;u.s -;

    Q.I u

    ~

    .bou

    00-

    .-0.0

    .-"'"'

    ~

    Q.I

    =

    ~

    ~0

    0. Q

    .I10. -UQ

    .I 0

    e c:

    10.=

    ~

    0.

    ZQJ

    ""3~QJ~e~

    ~.c~0,~10.

    ~~~~u~~~'t;-=";rn

    ~

    ~

    ~

    ~~

    ~

    "".I:u

    u

    E

    ~"'

    ~

    ~~

    ~~

    t=t=

    > ~

    ..,

    -;~"C

    "' ~

    t=

    -~

    ~~

    o

    o o

    .

    (/)ua

    "' ~

    v .!J

    ~

    v

    ...~~

    o

    t0

    v v

    .., v

    ..tie ~

    ~

    ...~

    .C

    -~.g

    .-v S

    .!.

    ~

    ~a-

    =~

    "'ij= e

    .~

    E

    v ~

    =

    ...0

    ~

    ~..

    ~~

    .., "'

    ~

    0 ...v

    ,Q"'

    u -\..

    .....rJvO

    . ~

    0.~O

    \..e

    ~

    "' 0

    ~v.-

    ~5\..

    u~~

    ...~

    ObO

    bO~

    ~\..~

    v ...\..~

    VoV

    v~

    \.IEv.!J

    ~oo.-v

    ~

    ~~

    ~,Q

    ev.E

    ~-g~

    ~\.Io.~

    'Eo~

    \.1o..s

    ;:J z

    .s

    "0' ~

    ~",bO

    t;-

    ~

    "' ~

    .>

    Q

    J.-bO

    O

    .-.;j

    'ca 10.

    "' "0'

    ~

    S

    u"' E

    ~

    ~

    ;.:=u!U

    ~

    ~

    U

    'ca ~

    ~

    >

    .. ;i:

    "0' .-~

    ~

    .-QJ

    u 10.

    8 t;-

    'tJ~

    ~

    2:g ~

    .>

    "'

    QJ

    ~

    5 ~

    "'

    r .;j

    t;- ~

    Io. O

    .E

    ~

    ~

    U

    .-!J.~

    ~

    ~

    ~

    ~

    M

    ~

    ~

    c;s:

    .-u ~

    Q

    J O

    !J

    M

    "0' ~

    O

    "0' Q

    J -<

    ~

    10. c.=

    ~

    .C

    8 S

    0..

    ~~

    ~

    ~~

    "0'"0'"0'

    QJ

    ~

    ~

    Su

    ~~

    ~~

    ~

    QJQ

    JS"O

    ' O

    ~

    'ca ~

    .c

    ~o~

    ~