Year 9 History homework In this booklet you will find all ... Year 9 History homework . In this...

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Transcript of Year 9 History homework In this booklet you will find all ... Year 9 History homework . In this...

  • 1

    Year 9 History homework

    In this booklet you will find all of your homework for this year. You will also find your end of unit knowledge tests, these will test all of the things that you have learnt about one topic. In Year 9, you will learn about the following topics:

    Year 9

    How did one man change the lives of so many people?

    WWI

    Why did people vote for Hitler?

    Why should we remember the

    Holocaust?

    What was the impact of WWII?

    How did the world change after WWII?

    How has Terrorism

    impacted the World?

    Name: Form: Teacher:

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    How did one man change the lives of so many people?

    Date due in Activities Re-read class notes on the LONG TERM CAUSES and GAVRILO PRINCIP Read through your knowledge organiser focusing on the causes of WWI. Create a revision mind map about what you have studied so far. Knowledge test questions:

    1. Which key term is defined by ‘countries building up their armed forces’? 2. Which key term is defined by ‘agreements between countries to support each other’? 3. What is the definition of Imperialism? 4. Which key term refers to people wanting to rule their own countries? 5. Name the countries in the Triple Alliance. 6. What is the name of the agreement between France, Britain and Russia? 7. Where was Archduke Franz Ferdinand assassinated? 8. When was Archduke Franz Ferdinand assassinated?

    Space to complete the activities and make your revision notes

    Knowledge test to be completed in class with your teacher

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    Question Response Which key term is defined by ‘countries building up their armed forces’?

    Which key term is defined by ‘agreements between countries to support each other’?

    What is the definition of Imperialism?

    Which key term refers to people wanting to rule their own countries?

    Name the countries in the Triple Alliance.

    What is the name of the agreement between France, Britain and Russia?

    Where was Archduke Franz Ferdinand assassinated?

    When was Archduke Franz Ferdinand assassinated?

    Total out of 8

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    Date due in Activities Read through article below taken from Spartacus History; I would like you to highlight the key facts about how, why and how many men joined up to fight in WWI and then answer the questions below: On the outbreak of war in August 1914, Britain had 247,432 regular troops. About 120,000 of these were in the British Expeditionary Army and the rest were stationed abroad. It was clear that more soldiers would be needed to defeat the German Army. On 7th August, 1914, Lord Kitchener, the war minister, immediately began a recruiting campaign by calling for men aged between 19 and 30 to join the British Army. At first this was very successful with an average of 33,000 men joining every day. Three weeks later Kitchener raised the recruiting age to 35 and by the middle of September over 500,000 men had volunteered their services.

    In 1914 David Lloyd George, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, was given the task of setting up a British War Propaganda Bureau (WPB). Lloyd George, appointed the successful writer and fellow Liberal MP, Charles Masterman as head of the organization. The WPB arranged for journalists like Bottomley to visit the Western Front. To persuade young men to join the armed forces Horatio Bottomley gave the impression that the war would be over in a few weeks. In a speech at the Bournemouth Winter Gardens in September, 1915, he argued: "Ladies and gentlemen, I want you to pull yourselves together. I want to assure you that within six weeks of to-day we shall have the Huns on the run. We shall drive them out of France, out of Flanders, out of Belgium, across the Rhine, and back into their own territory!”

    During the first few months of the war the War Propaganda Bureau published pamphlets such as the Report on Alleged German Outrages, which gave credence to the idea that the German Army had systematically tortured Belgian civilians. Other pamphlets published by the WPB that helped with recruitment included To Arms! (Arthur Conan Doyle), The Barbarism in Berlin (G. K. Chesterton), The New Army (Rudyard Kipling) and Liberty, A Statement of the British Case (Arnold Bennett). The British government also began a successful poster campaign. Artists such as Saville Lumley, Alfred Leete, Frank

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    Brangwyn and Norman Lindsay, produced a series of posters urging men to join the British Army. The desire to fight continued into 1915 and by the end of that year some two million men had volunteered their services.

    Why do you think the Government thought it was important to recruit new men to the armed forces? Use the article and your contextual knowledge to help you.

    Explain how the Government used Propaganda to try and help recruit soldiers to the Army.

    How far were the government’s recruitment methods successful between 1914 and 1915?

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    Date due in Activities Re-read class notes on the topics you have studied so far and through your knowledge organiser highlighting information about what the fighting was actually like. Create a revision mind map about what you have studied so far. Knowledge test questions:

    1. How many soldiers from across the British Empire fought in the British army? 2. What is the main area of trenches in the Great War known as? 3. How far did the trench system stretch? 4. What two medical conditions do we associate with Trench warfare? 5. Which force had the better trenches? 6. What was the main cause of Trenchfoot? 7. Give an example of someone who was suffering with Shellshock? 8. Name one part of the Trench system?

    Space to complete the activities and make your revision notes

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    Knowledge test to be completed in class with your teacher

    Question Response How many soldiers from across the British Empire fought in the British army?

    What is the main area of trenches in the Great War known as?

    Name one part of the Trench system?

    Which force had the better trenches?

    What two medical conditions do we associate with Trench warfare?

    What was the main cause of Trenchfoot?

    Give an example of someone who was suffering with Shellshock?

    How far did the trench system stretch?

    Total out of 8

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    Date due in Activities Read through the article below about The Battle of the Somme. Then I want you to complete exam skills below. The Battle of the Somme was one of the defining events of the First World War, resulting in over one million casualties. 2016 marks the centenary of the battle. The Battle of the Somme began on 1 July 1916. It is one of the most famous battles of the First World War because of the loss of 19,000 British troops killed in a single day (from a total of 58,000 casualties) – the first day of the battle. No other conflict, before or since, can state such a statistic. The battle began with an attack on a 25km front in France, north of the Somme river, between the towns of Arras and Albert. Fighting raged for almost five months, from 1 July to 18 November 1916. Originally planned as a joint British and French offensive, its aims were both to exhaust the German forces and to gain territory. At the start of 1916, however, the Battle of Verdun had drained France of most of their troops, thus the Somme attack became predominantly British and, in addition, was brought forward from August to relieve the pressure on the French. Sir Douglas Haig, the new British Commander in Chief, took over the planning and execution of the attack and worked with General Rawlinson, whose Fourth Army was to lead the assault. In preparation, the British bombarded the German lines for eight days in June 1916. They intended to destroy the German defences so that the British could attack over ‘no man’s land’ and capture the German lines.

    The Germans, however, had built heavy concrete bunkers together with ferocious barbed wire barriers – the British bombardment failed to destroy either. Many of the poorly constructed British munitions failed to work and the eight- day British assault alerted the Germans to the impending attack – they were armed, ready and solidly defended by concrete and barbed wire. The British, having been led to believe there would be little enemy opposition, were pushed back by the German machine guns or simply mown down as they crossed no man’s land, leading to the infamous statistics relating to the highest number of deaths ever on a single day of battle. Despite the losses, the British and French continued the attack. German troops were reinforced from Verdun and despite occasional Allied victories (Pozieres was captured by the Australians in July) most advances were rarely followed up and were quickly lost again. Poor weather, including snow, finally stopped the Somme offensive on 18 November 1916. During the attack, the Allies had gained approximately 12km of ground at an estimated cost of 620,000 casualties (420,000 British, 200,000 French). The Germans lost around 500,000 men.

    http://www.britishlegion.org.uk/remembrance/ww1-centenary/somme-100/

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    TASK 1: Read through and annotate the key parts of the question:

    “The main reason for the initial