Worker Safety

download Worker Safety

of 50

  • date post

    09-Feb-2016
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    36
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

description

Worker Safety. Click to advance the presentation. How to Use this Presentation. You should be seeing a window like the one shown below. Click the buttons at the lower left to advance the presentation. Click here to advance the presentation. Be sure to read the notes wherever they appear. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Transcript of Worker Safety

1.5 Worker Safety PPT

Worker Safety Click to advance the presentationHello, and welcome to the online portion of worker safety. In this presentation, you will learn about preparing for safe home visits, driving to home visits, staying safe at home visits, and staying safe while in the office.

To continue this presentation, click the Play button. 1

Click here to advance the presentation Be sure to read the notes wherever they appear.How to Use this PresentationYou should be seeing a window like the one shown below.Click the buttons at the lower left to advance the presentation.

Before reading presentation: Do worksheet Part 1 (in Canvas)Read the PresentationComplete worksheet Part 2, using what you learned in the presentationDiscussion with your coach (and in some cases, your new coworkers)You are HereGo back to CanvasTalk with coach Youve completed thisThis self-paced presentation is part of an instructional sequence.(Click the step buttons at lower left to advance the presentation)How to Use this PresentationCompetencies

SW122-01 Understands the provisions of agency policies, procedures, and formal protocols designed to ensure the safety of staff members

Curricular competencies:

Awareness of potentially dangerous conditions in workplace and/or in the fieldAbility to recognize potentially dangerous conditions in workplace and/or in the fieldAbility to react appropriately and safely when faced with dangerous situationsKnows the emotional and behavioral indicators of escalating violence and potential dangerousness and safety strategies, including developing an exit plan to protect oneself during home visits Click Play to advanceHeres the developmental competency for this session: Understands the provisions of agency policies, procedures, and formal protocols designed to ensure the safety of staff members.

What does this mean? Well, these curricular competencies spell out what it means. After reading them, click the Play button to advance to the next screen.4Worksheet Activity

If you have not already downloaded and filled out the Worker Safety Worksheet, do so now. (The worksheet is in Canvas)

Keep the worksheet open as you proceed through this presentation, and amend your entries as you learn.

Click Play to advance the session

If you havent already done the prelearning journaling activity in Canvas, now is the time to do it.

5Why be Concerned about Worker Safety?

Psychological or physical aggression

Driving hazards

Trip or fall hazard

Methamphetamine

Dangerous animalsWhy be concerned about worker safety? As a social worker, you might encounter psychological or physical aggression, dangerous animals, driving hazards, trip or fall hazards, or hazardous substances.

6Why be Concerned about Worker Safety?

Psychological or physical aggression

Dangerous animals

Driving hazards

Trip or fall hazard

Hazardous substancesBy learning about these hazards and how to prevent or protect yourself from them, you can keep yourself safe.But most importantly, by learning about these hazards and how to prevent or protect yourself from them, you can keep yourself safe. By keeping yourself safe you decrease the likelihood of incurring physical/psychological harm that can contribute to burnout and/or feelings of stress around your job.

7Self Awareness

Boundaries / Limit setting behaviors Communication Feelings Intuition Problem solving skills Conflict Management

The first step in being able to keep yourself safe is to become aware of your own responses (both physical & emotional), behavior, hot buttons, bias, etc. Sometimes we can unintentionally escalate situations by the way we respond (or fail to respond).8Think about Boundaries

What is acceptable behavior? How to set limits Maintaining limits

Think for a minute about boundaries. What is acceptable behavior? How to set limits-letting people know consequences up front (example: if you choose not to let me in to see your home environment, I will have to rely on information Ive received from other people when Im making an assessment of your childs safety OR if you choose not to go to your evaluation I am obligated to report that back to the court and it will likely influence decision making around the reunification of your child) Maintaining limits-Be consistent in the messages you send to people. If you allow individuals to be hostile to you (regardless of the situation) once, you may be setting up a dynamic where they think that is okay, particularly with individuals who have a tendency to be manipulative. Be firm, but fair.

9Boundaries

Boundaries set the tone for a professional relationship Know your triggers What would a reasonable person do?Do you bend your rules?Talk with your supervisor about limits

Think about boundaries, which set the tone for a professional relationship. Some individuals will purposely test you to find out what they can get away with. Set the tone early in the relationship that you want to partner with them, but will be unable to do so if they are engaging in threatening, aggressive, or manipulative behavior towards you.10Communication

Awareness of ALL communication

Verbal Nonverbal Paraverbal

Be aware of how you are communicating. Verbally avoid common pitfalls such as: talking down/talking to them like a child, matching their aggressive/hostile tone, using power language, sugar-coating, talking in overly professional jargon (avoid acronyms), etc.Non-Verbally avoid common pitfalls such as: sighing, being distracted by something else (answering your cell while in the middle of an interview-unless absolutely necessary!), rolling your eyes, laughing at inappropriate times, etcParaverbal means what we relay through the tone, pitch, and pacing of our voices.11Check Is it OK for a client to yell at me?

Is it OK for me to yell at a client?

Is it OK for a client to threaten me?

Is it OK for me to threaten a client?

Is it OK for a client to lie to me?

Is it OK for me to lie to a client?

Are any of these OK? Be aware of the impact your behavior might have on the situation. Many individuals are testing us to see how we respond to pressure. This might set up a pattern of interaction that does not benefit the overall goals of our work with families.12PowerDo not be defensiveDo not defend yourself or anyone elseDo not make the client show you that they must be respected; show them respect no matter whatAvoid putting clients in positions that embarrass themHelp them Save face not sure what this means

Dont get into a direct power struggle with an angry client. You are in a position of power, however, we need to set up a dynamic in our relationships with individuals that is focused on mutual respect and that starts with how we communicate. Our practice model offers some effective ways to help move beyond the power struggle to focus on partnership in finding solutions to the everyday life tasks that the family needs to accomplish safely for their child(ren).13Messengers of Intuition

Nagging feelings Persistent thoughts Sarcasm Wonder Anxiety Curiosity Hunches Gut feelings Doubt Hesitation Suspicion Apprehension

Although we dont want to rely entirely on our intuition in our work with families, it can be a useful tool in conjunction with information gathered prior to meeting, and current behavioral indicators, to help us assess the safety of a situation.14Personal Safety Risk Assessment

One of the most effective interventions to ensure worker safety is to assess for safety before ever leaving the office.

In fact CA Operations Manual 8612 mandates it. Click here to read the policy.

15Personal Safety Risk Assessment

Before making client contact, staff will make ongoing assessments of situations based on the nature of the allegation(s) or changing case characteristics and risk factors. The following are issues for social workers and supervisors to consider before making field visitsAre firearms or other weapons noted in the referral or record?Is there a previous history of domestic violence or other violent behavior towards others (this includes adults and youth)?Is there a history of criminal activity, mental illness, substance abuse, and ritualistic abuse or cult practices?Is the family's geographic location isolated or dangerous and is there cell phone coverage in that location?Is the contact scheduled after normal working hours?Are there aggressive animals on or near the premises?Is there a "danger to worker" notification screen on the referral?Is there lack of available information?16Common Risk Factors

Prior ViolenceDefensive FeelingsPhysical Risk FactorsSituational FactorsThere are some common factors that should be considered when assessing for worker safety. Research has identified a number of traits and factors that may increase the risk of violence.

Prior Violence. Each time someone commits a violent act, it is more probable that violence will happen again. Since this is the single best predictor of violence, it is a good idea to ask questions about past or current violent behavior during your initial contact with a child or family member. Specifically, you want to know about a person's most violent act, and how often he or she has violent thoughts. Defensive Feelings. Several internal factors have been associated with aggressive encounters. These include fear, humiliation, boredom, grief, and a sense of powerlessness. To reduce risk, avoid putting clients in positions that embarrass them. Rather, give them knowledge that empowers them and help them see other, nonviolent options. Physical Factors. Physical factors increase the risk of violence as