WELSH HOUSING

1
810 a similar but more severe attack occurred, during which he vomited at one time a teaspoonful of bright blood and for two days the stools were black. On admission he was in another attack. He had been ill two weeks with severe and paroxysmal pain which radiated upwards and to the left from the epigastrium with frequent vomiting. On one occa- sion he vomited about 2 ounces of bright blood. The pain was more severe late in the evening or at night. The stools were sometimes dark. On admission the temperature was 101’ 50 F. and the pulse was 108. There was slight epi- gastric tenderness. Chemical and microscopic tests showed that there was blood in the stools. The symptoms rapidly subsided, the tenderness disappeared, and he was dis- charged on Jan. 9th, 1909, to attend as an out-patient. On Feb. 20th he was readmitted. He had been attacked two days previously with epigastric distress and vomit- ing. There were small amounts of bright blood in the vomit. Attacks of pain occurred in sharp paroxysms. The temperature was 1020 and there were marked epigastric tenderness and muscular spasm. These symptoms subsided somewhat on the three following days. Bt was thought that subacute perforation of the ulcer had taken place. On the 24th a median incision was made above the umbilicus and a large indurated ulcer was found on the lesser curvature near the pylorus and firmly adherent to the liver. The adhesions were not disturbed. Posterior gastro-enterostomy was per- formed with a short loop. Recovery was uneventful save for slight bronchitis. After the operation the child was able to eat well and gained weight, and in November was in excellent condition. Dr. Lund claims that the boy is the youngest patient on whom an operation has been performed for gastric ulcer. - WELSH HOUSING. OUR columns have from time to time contained reports indicating serious deficiencies in the housing conditions of Wales, and we welcomed recently the formation of an influential society for the purpose of improving them materially. In our present issue will be found an interest- ing and lurid little communication from W. St.J. H. (p. 815), in which there appears ample confirmation from the published returns of the Registrar-General and other sources of the existence of a condition of things which calls for fuller inquiry and some action beyond that which is possible to private enterprise. The workers of Wales are entitled to attention that is too often denied to the patient and helpless toilers. The housing question is, however, not entirely a question for the working classes, since the general health and welfare of the community concern deeply the classes whose means enable them to select for themselves fitting housing amenities. The question has even a still wider aspect. Wales is so much the happy hunting ground of the health-seeker from English towns that the housing of the Principality becomes, to a consider- able degree, a concern of the nation, as well as of the native labouring hard for existence on his own soil. We are not ourselves committed to the figures given by our correspondent, but we have every reason to trust his accuracy, and it is evident from the references constantly appearing in the press of Wales that there is a primâ-facie case for the inference that the excessive mortality in Wales is in some measure due to the faulty housing of the people. Instances are not wanting- one authenticated case is now before us-of the occurrence of pulmonary tuberculosis contracted by even septuagenarians on removal to dwellings occupied by tuberculous patients. Obviously the conditions are entirely favourable for such occurrences, and, consequently, even more so for those of more susceptible ages. The work of the Housing Association for Wales requires the cooperation of a large number of benevolently-minded persons, and we have no doubt that the medical profession will become, as always, a powerful ally in promoting preventive, as well as remedial, measures. We shall need no excuse for returning to this important question if, on further inquiry, we are furnished with the fuller data which are now urgently needed. WE are informed that all those recently elected to the Beit Memorial Fellowships for Medical Research were required to resign their paid appointments. Two Fellows were allowed to retain honorary posts necessary in order to obtain material for their research. One Fellow was allowed to hold an appointment of quite minor importance not directly connected with the subject of his research. There is no intention of departing from the regulation requiring the Fellows to devote the whole of their time to their authorised research. The list of academic distinctions, contributions to science and medicine, and appointments held was published in order to indicate the status of the candidates elected to Fellowships. - THE Second International Congress on Occupational Diseases will be held in Brussels this year from Sept. 10th to 14th. A powerful British National Committee has been formed to promote the objects of the Congress under the honorary presidency of the Right Honourable Winston S. Churchill and the Right Honourable Herbert Samuel. The Presidents are Sir Thomas Clifford Allbutt and Professor Sheridan Delepine, and the secretaries Dr. T. M. Legge, H. M. Medical Inspector of Factories, and Mr. W. F. Dearden, honorary secretary of the Association of Certifying Factory Surgeons, to whom communications may be addressed at 15, Salisbury-buildings, Trafford-road, Manchester. WE regret to announce the death, at Dumfries, on March 8th, of Dr. James Rutherford, the distinguished alienist, who was physician-superintendent of the Crichton Royal Institution, Dumfries, for 25 years, until his retirement in 1907. He was in his 71st year. AN important International Exhibition of Hygiene, con- cerning which we shall publish particulars in a future issue, is announced to be held at Dresden in 1911. THE " ENSEIGNEMENT MÉDICO-MUTUEL INTER- NATIONAL."-The seventh post-graduate tour of this body, which is better known under the short title of the E. M. I.," will this year take place under the patronage of the Govern- ment of France between August 1st and 20th, the countries to be visited being Belgium aud Holland, and the return journey being made vii Luxembourg and Alsace. The meeting place will be Lille and the place of disbanding Vittel. The itinerary will include Ostend, Middelkirk, Blankenburg, Bruges, Ghent, Brussels, Louvain, Antwerp, Rotterdam, The Hague, Leyden, Amsterdam, the Ile de Marken, Utrecht, Liege, Spa, Bourgoumont, Luxembourg, Strasbourg, Munster, La Schlucht, and Gerardmer. The organising committee of the "E.M.I." has arranged for this year’s tour to coincide with the International Exhibition at Brussels, which the members of the tour will have full opportunities of visiting during their stay in the Belgian capital. The detailed programme of the tour will be found in the February number of the " ’ E. M. I., " which is published at 12, Rue François Millet, Paris, and will be sent to any- one who forwards a postage stamp voucher to the value of 15 centimes. We have much pleasure in commending this tour to the notice of our readers, seeing that some of its predecessors have been joined with enjoyment and profit by medical men from this country. The object of the tour is to visit the medical institutions at the various stopping places and to promote good-fellowship amongst medical men of different nationalities who may participate in it.

Transcript of WELSH HOUSING

Page 1: WELSH HOUSING

810

a similar but more severe attack occurred, during which hevomited at one time a teaspoonful of bright blood and for twodays the stools were black. On admission he was in another

attack. He had been ill two weeks with severe and

paroxysmal pain which radiated upwards and to the leftfrom the epigastrium with frequent vomiting. On one occa-

sion he vomited about 2 ounces of bright blood. The painwas more severe late in the evening or at night. The stoolswere sometimes dark. On admission the temperature was101’ 50 F. and the pulse was 108. There was slight epi-gastric tenderness. Chemical and microscopic tests showedthat there was blood in the stools. The symptoms rapidlysubsided, the tenderness disappeared, and he was dis-

charged on Jan. 9th, 1909, to attend as an out-patient.On Feb. 20th he was readmitted. He had been attacked

two days previously with epigastric distress and vomit-

ing. There were small amounts of bright blood in the

vomit. Attacks of pain occurred in sharp paroxysms.The temperature was 1020 and there were marked epigastrictenderness and muscular spasm. These symptoms subsidedsomewhat on the three following days. Bt was thought thatsubacute perforation of the ulcer had taken place. On the

24th a median incision was made above the umbilicus and a

large indurated ulcer was found on the lesser curvature nearthe pylorus and firmly adherent to the liver. The adhesionswere not disturbed. Posterior gastro-enterostomy was per-formed with a short loop. Recovery was uneventful save forslight bronchitis. After the operation the child was able toeat well and gained weight, and in November was in

excellent condition. Dr. Lund claims that the boy is theyoungest patient on whom an operation has been performedfor gastric ulcer.

-

WELSH HOUSING.

OUR columns have from time to time contained reportsindicating serious deficiencies in the housing conditions ofWales, and we welcomed recently the formation of an

influential society for the purpose of improving them

materially. In our present issue will be found an interest-

ing and lurid little communication from W. St.J. H.

(p. 815), in which there appears ample confirmation fromthe published returns of the Registrar-General and other

sources of the existence of a condition of things whichcalls for fuller inquiry and some action beyond that

which is possible to private enterprise. The workers of

Wales are entitled to attention that is too often denied to the

patient and helpless toilers. The housing question is,however, not entirely a question for the working classes, sincethe general health and welfare of the community concerndeeply the classes whose means enable them to select

for themselves fitting housing amenities. The questionhas even a still wider aspect. Wales is so much the happyhunting ground of the health-seeker from English townsthat the housing of the Principality becomes, to a consider-able degree, a concern of the nation, as well as of the nativelabouring hard for existence on his own soil. We are notourselves committed to the figures given by our correspondent,but we have every reason to trust his accuracy, and it is

evident from the references constantly appearing in the pressof Wales that there is a primâ-facie case for the inference thatthe excessive mortality in Wales is in some measure due tothe faulty housing of the people. Instances are not wanting-one authenticated case is now before us-of the occurrence of

pulmonary tuberculosis contracted by even septuagenarianson removal to dwellings occupied by tuberculous patients.Obviously the conditions are entirely favourable for suchoccurrences, and, consequently, even more so for those ofmore susceptible ages. The work of the Housing Associationfor Wales requires the cooperation of a large number of

benevolently-minded persons, and we have no doubt that themedical profession will become, as always, a powerful ally inpromoting preventive, as well as remedial, measures. Weshall need no excuse for returning to this important questionif, on further inquiry, we are furnished with the fuller

data which are now urgently needed.

WE are informed that all those recently elected to theBeit Memorial Fellowships for Medical Research were

required to resign their paid appointments. Two Fellowswere allowed to retain honorary posts necessary in order toobtain material for their research. One Fellow was allowedto hold an appointment of quite minor importance not

directly connected with the subject of his research. Thereis no intention of departing from the regulation requiring theFellows to devote the whole of their time to their authorisedresearch. The list of academic distinctions, contributions toscience and medicine, and appointments held was publishedin order to indicate the status of the candidates elected to

Fellowships. -

THE Second International Congress on OccupationalDiseases will be held in Brussels this year from Sept. 10th to14th. A powerful British National Committee has beenformed to promote the objects of the Congress under thehonorary presidency of the Right Honourable Winston S.Churchill and the Right Honourable Herbert Samuel. The

Presidents are Sir Thomas Clifford Allbutt and ProfessorSheridan Delepine, and the secretaries Dr. T. M. Legge,H. M. Medical Inspector of Factories, and Mr. W. F. Dearden,honorary secretary of the Association of Certifying FactorySurgeons, to whom communications may be addressed at 15,Salisbury-buildings, Trafford-road, Manchester.

WE regret to announce the death, at Dumfries, on

March 8th, of Dr. James Rutherford, the distinguishedalienist, who was physician-superintendent of the CrichtonRoyal Institution, Dumfries, for 25 years, until his retirementin 1907. He was in his 71st year.

AN important International Exhibition of Hygiene, con-

cerning which we shall publish particulars in a future issue,is announced to be held at Dresden in 1911. -

THE " ENSEIGNEMENT MÉDICO-MUTUEL INTER-NATIONAL."-The seventh post-graduate tour of this body,which is better known under the short title of the E. M. I.,"will this year take place under the patronage of the Govern-ment of France between August 1st and 20th, the countriesto be visited being Belgium aud Holland, and the returnjourney being made vii Luxembourg and Alsace. The

meeting place will be Lille and the place of disbandingVittel. The itinerary will include Ostend, Middelkirk,Blankenburg, Bruges, Ghent, Brussels, Louvain, Antwerp,Rotterdam, The Hague, Leyden, Amsterdam, the Ile de

Marken, Utrecht, Liege, Spa, Bourgoumont, Luxembourg,Strasbourg, Munster, La Schlucht, and Gerardmer. The

organising committee of the "E.M.I." has arranged forthis year’s tour to coincide with the International Exhibitionat Brussels, which the members of the tour will have fullopportunities of visiting during their stay in the Belgiancapital. The detailed programme of the tour will be foundin the February number of the " ’ E. M. I., " which is publishedat 12, Rue François Millet, Paris, and will be sent to any-one who forwards a postage stamp voucher to the value of15 centimes. We have much pleasure in commending thistour to the notice of our readers, seeing that some of itspredecessors have been joined with enjoyment and profit bymedical men from this country. The object of the tour is tovisit the medical institutions at the various stopping placesand to promote good-fellowship amongst medical men ofdifferent nationalities who may participate in it.