Visitor Guide & Map - Heard Museum 20/04/2020 ¢  WELCOME TO THE HEARD MUSEUM COVER:...

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Transcript of Visitor Guide & Map - Heard Museum 20/04/2020 ¢  WELCOME TO THE HEARD MUSEUM COVER:...

  • Visitor Guide & Map HIGHLIGHTS FOR WINTER 2019

    On Display Through May 3, 2020

  • HEARD MUSEUM WINTER 2020 VISITOR GUIDE | 1

    For 90 years, the Heard Museum has attracted visitors from around the globe who come to learn about the arts and cultures of the Native people of the Americas. We hope you enjoy this campus of Spanish Colonial architecture, with courtyards, water features and sculpture gardens. The Heard Museum, which has more than 130,000 square feet of galleries, classrooms and performance space, is known worldwide for its exhibitions and programs celebrating Native artists, and for its Shop, which provides the opportunity to purchase museum-quality, authentic American Indian artworks.

    MUSEUM & SHOP HOURS 2301 N. Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85004 Main: 602.252.8840 Heard Hotline: 602.252.8848 Shop: 602.252.8344 n 1.800.252.8344

    Monday to Saturday, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

    Closed Easter Sunday, Independence Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas.

    MUSEUM INFORMATION GUIDED TOURS

    Public tours are free with museum admission and offered daily at 12, 2 and 3 p.m., beginning at the Information Desk just past the lobby. Additional Gallery tours are offered on a varying schedule. Private group tours are also available; call 602.252.8840 to schedule a private tour.

    OUTREACH PROGRAMS

    Special programs are available to groups of children and adults. Please call 602.252.8840 for more information.

    PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO n No flash, video light, tripods or selfie

    sticks are allowed in the galleries. No commercial photography.

    n Copyright for many works of art in the museum rests with the artists. The Heard Museum does not assume liability for violation of copyright law by a photographer (Title 17, United States Code). Photography may not be used for publication without written permission from the museum and/or artists.

    WELCOME TO THE HEARD MUSEUM

    COVER:

  • HEARD MUSEUM WINTER 2020 VISITOR GUIDE | 3

    Join today to receive special benefits including complimentary access to all exhibitions, including David Hockney's Yosemite and Masters of California Basketry. PLUS, Members receive skip-the-line privileges and members-only pricing for most programs and events, including the World Championship Hoop Dance Contest and the Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market.

    It’s easy to join – sign up when you arrive or stop by the Admissions Desk to redeem your same-day admission tickets towards the cost of a membership. Or, join online at heard.org/membership.

    Year-round Member Benefits Include:

    ■ Invitations to members-only events

    ■ Priority entrance on every visit

    ■ 10% discount in the café and shops

    ■ Subscription to the members-only

    publication Earth Song

    ■ Plus much more!

    Looking to deepen your connection with the Heard? Join our Circles of Giving program (starting at $2,000) by calling 602.251.0262 or emailing circles@heard.org.

    BOARD OF TRUSTEES

    Wick Pilcher, Chair John F. Lomax, Vice Chair

    James R. Huntwork, Secretary Karen Abraham, Treasurer

    David M. Roche, Dickey Family Director and CEO

    TRUSTEES Tony Astorga Arlene K. Ben-Horin Gregory H. Boyce John Coggins Adrian N. Cohen Dr. Craig Cohen Robert A. Cowie Elizabeth Murfee

    DeConcini Judy Dworkin John Furth John Graham David A. Hansen Carrie L. Hulburd Sharron Lewis Gov. Stephen R. Lewis

    Marigold Linton Janis Lyon John Melamed Robert Meyer Scott Montgomery Susan H. Navran Scott H. O’Connor Leland Peterson Trevor Reed William G. Ridenour Margo Simons Don Smith Sue Snyder Ginger Sykes Torres Christy Vezolles David Wilshin

    LIFE TRUSTEES Kay Benedict Howard R. Berlin James T. Bialac Dr. George Blue Spruce, Jr. Mark Bonsall Herbert J. Bool Robert B. Bulla F. Wesley Clelland, III Norma Jean Coulter Alice J. Dickey†

    Robert J. Duffy Mary G. Hamilton Barbara Heard Patricia K. Hibbeler Joel P. Hoxie Mary Hudak Dr. Thomas M. Hudak Carrie L. Hulburd

    Richard L. Johnes Edward F. Lowry Frederick A. Lynn Dennis H. Lyon†

    Carol Ann Mackay Clint J. Magnussen Robert L. Matthews Miriam J. McClennen Mary Ellen McKee James Meenaghan Dr. Wayne Lee Mitchell Dr. Arthur L. Pelberg David E. Reese William C. Schubert Sheryl L. Sculley Richard H. Silverman John B. Stiteler John G. Stuart

    MEMBERS EXPERIENCE MORE Leekya Deyuse (Zuni Pueblo), 1889-1966, silver and turquoise squash blossom necklace, 1939.

    † deceased

  • HOME

    4 | HEARD MUSEUM WINTER 2020 VISITOR GUIDE

    WE ARE HERE: ARIZONA'S FEDERALLY RECOGNIZED TRIBAL NATIONS

    Arizona is fortunate to have within its borders

    22 sovereign tribal nations whose people have

    called this land HOME for thousands of years—

    long before there was a United States and long

    before there was an Arizona. After centuries

    of colonization, warfare, forced removal and

    dispossession, the federal government created

    reservations, consisting of a small portion of

    traditional tribal lands. Today, approximately 28

    percent of Arizona land is tribal land.

    Within the HOME exhibition that encompasses the

    region of the Southwest, we have featured special

    artworks made by people from the 22 federally

    recognized tribal nations of Arizona. Many of those

    artworks were created within recent decades,

    underscoring the ringing statement, We Are Here!

    Timothy Terry, Jr. (b. 1965)

    Akimel O’otham, Gila River Indian

    Community

    Calendar stick, 2004

    Heard Museum Collection

  • HEARD MUSEUM WINTER 2020 VISITOR GUIDE | 5

    NATIVE PEOPLE IN THE SOUTHWEST

  • THE HOPI TRIBE

    Federally Recognized: 1882 The Hopi have lived continuously in northern Arizona

    since 500 C.E. They are one of the oldest living cultures in

    documented history; the village of Old Orayvi is the oldest

    continuously inhabited village in North America. Today, Hopi

    tribal lands encompass 2,410 square miles in northeastern

    Arizona, with 12 villages located on three mesas. Each village

    is an autonomous government, but the Hopi Tribal Council

    makes laws for the tribe and sets policies to oversee tribal

    business. The tribal lands are located entirely within the

    Navajo Nation. Of the many ancient cultural arts of the Hopi

    people—basketry, ceramics, weaving and carving—silver

    jewelry is a 20th-century development. To learn more, visit

    https://www.hopi-nsn.gov/

    Morris Robinson (1900-1987)

    Hopi Tribe

    Necklace, 1950s

    Gift of Mareen Allen Nichols

    6 | HEARD MUSEUM WINTER 2020 VISITOR GUIDE

    HOME

    PUEBLO OF ZUNI

    Federally Recognized: 1877 Traditional homelands of the A:shiwi (Zuni) stretch from

    the Grand Canyon to the Rio Grande in central New Mexico.

    For the past 300 years, many of the A:shiwi have lived in

    the Pueblo of Zuni in New Mexico. The A:shiwi have worked

    successfully since the 1960s to secure sacred ceremonial

    lands, including land located in Apache County in eastern

    Arizona. The A:shiwi A:wan Museum and Heritage Center

    presents both two- and three-dimensional arts and

    defines itself as an “ecomuseum” in harmony with Zuni’s

    environmental values. A:shiwi ceramics and jewelry often

    express artists’ thoughts of rain and animals associated with

    water. A:shiwi jewelers are known for their excellent lapidary

    work. To learn more, visit http://www.ashiwi.org/Josephine Nahohai (1912-2001), Milford Nahohai (b. 1953),

    Randy Nahohai (1958-2015)

    Pueblo of Zuni

    Jar, 1983

    Heard Museum Collection

  • 8 | HEARD MUSEUM WINTER 2020 VISITOR GUIDE

    HOME

    THE NAVAJO NATION

    Federally Recognized: 1868

    The Diné (Navajo) are the largest tribal nation in the United States in land area. With 275,000 enrolled members and lands in New Mexico and Utah, in addition to Arizona, Diné Bikéyah (Navajoland) is larger than 10 of the 50 U.S. states. For more than three centuries, the Diné have lived within their four sacred mountains. In 1863, more than 10,000 Diné were forced to march from their land on the Long Walk to imprisonment by the U.S. government at Bosque Redondo in New Mexico. In 1868, a treaty with the federal government allowed the survivors to return to a much-reduced portion of their land, however still within the four sacred mountains. Among Navajo arts, textiles are best known. Navajo textiles have changed over centuries, but whether created as garments or artworks, they continue to represent the finest of textile creations. Visitors to the Navajo Nation can learn more about Diné history at several museums including the Navajo Nation Museum in Window Rock, Arizona; the Ned A. Hatathli Cultural Center at Dine College, Tsalie, Arizona; The Navajo Code Talkers Museum and the Navajo Interactive Museum both in Tuba City, Arizona. To learn more on the web, visit http://www.navajo-nsn.gov/

    KAIBAB BAND OF PAIUTE INDIANS

    Federally Recognized: 1934

    With lands located about 50 miles north of the Grand Canyon along the Arizona/Utah border and tribal headquarters in Fredonia, the Kaibab-Paiute number approximately 250 enrolled members. Pipe Spring National Monument is located entirely within the tribe’s