VinE Back to School Newsletter #1

download VinE Back to School Newsletter #1

of 12

  • date post

    02-Apr-2016
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    214
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

description

 

Transcript of VinE Back to School Newsletter #1

  • BACK TO S

    CHOOL Presents ISSUE 1

  • Tan Yang En President of the 8th VinE Committee, Studying Economics at LSE

  • Introducing LeonarD Royce Yong Having graduated from VJ in 2009, Leonard is now reading Economics at University College of London (UCL) and will be beginning his third year this September. Approachable and funny, feel free to talk to him about climbing too!

    Which city are you living in? I live in Central London, which makes it really convenient for me to go to campus (UCL). What were you most concerned with about this city (e.g. safety, hygiene, food, being homesick, making friends)? My main concern when first coming over to London was the cost of living, safety, and then followed by the lack of local food (where to find my Char Kway Teow?!?!). But the great thing about London is that it is much more an International City than a British City. So almost any kind of cuisine can be found here. On top of that, the general culture of the people here is a lot more open. Opportunities to meet people of different origins and interest are abundant.

    What do you like most about your city? There is never a boring moment for me in London, there is always something to do. Cost of living remains a concern but can be managed with some savvy discount-hunting and frugal student budgeting. What do you dislike most about your city? But perhaps the most annoying thing about London are the tube strikes (transport workers go on strike). This is most inconvenient especially during the exam period. Is there a must-do or must-see or must-eat (being Singaporeans)? Must-do visit Brick Lane on a Sunday. Must see Les Miserables. Must-eat a proper Full English Breakfast.

  • How did you approach your parents regarding the financing of your tertiary education? Were you concerned about the costs of an overseas education? What were the pros and cons that went through your parents and your mind? Thus far, do you think the financial cost of an overseas education is worth it? What makes it worth/ not worth it? What are the intangible benefits, in your opinion, that you may have gained from your years abroad thus far? My parents and I agreed for a long time that an overseas education would broaden my horizons in ways that a local university will not be able to do so. The issue of cost was always a concern. Considering that the British pound is almost twice as strong as the Singapore dollar, things are naturally much more expensive here than in Singapore. This concern was compounded by the fact that London property prices and rents have recently been skyrocketing; living here was not going to be cheap. In the end, we agreed that I should only come here to pursue a degree if the university, course and city was indeed worth the premium. I would say that the experience thus far has assured me greatly that the cost spent to pursue a BSc. Economics at UCL is worth every penny paid. Its not just about the education proper per se, it is also about the opportunity to network and establish a career overseas (if an overseas working experience is on your mind). And these are the things which are immeasurably valuable and unquantifiable. Are you living comfortably based on your current monthly allowance either from parents/ scholarship provider? (Please indicate how much per month if you are comfortable with it) How do you manage your finances? What do you spend most and save on most? Any tips for budgeting? 600/mth (excluding rent) This amount is sufficient for me to live comfortably and eat out occasionally. Cooking your own meals is really the most economical way to live. But the occasional sushi platter is within my means. I check my account balance online regularly to keep track of my spending. I can still save up for travelling as well.

  • Introducing Lim Cheng Yee Reading Politics, Philosophy and Economics at the University of Warwick, Cheng Yee graduated from VJ in the class of 2012 and will be starting her second year this fall. Shes also a recipient of the Public Service Commission (PSC) scholarship. Which city are you living in? Im currently studying in University of Warwick but living in Coventry. It is a common misconception is that University of Warwick is in Warwick, but its actually in Coventry. What were you most concerned with about this city (e.g. safety, hygiene, food, being homesick, making friends)? Nothing much, Coventry is relatively safer than most cities but also less busy. The variety of food and shopping is not as extensive as bigger cities. But if youre really itching for some shopping, you can always drop by Birmingham Bullring Shopping Centre, one of the busiest malls in UK. What do you like most about your city? University of Warwick is actually a bus ride away from Coventry city centre, so we are away from the hustle and bustle of a city. I really appreciate the fact that we have a campus university and theres a lot of greenery on campus! Is there a must-do or must-see or must-eat (being Singaporeans)? A good place to travel to from Coventry is Stratford upon Avon. For those of you interested in English Literature, Stratford is Shakespeares birthplace so you can visit the houses he lived in and also catch a Shakespeare play at the theatre there!

  • How did you approach your parents regarding the financing of your tertiary education? Were you concerned about the costs of an overseas education? What were the pros and cons that went through your parents and your mind? Thus far, do you think the financial cost of an overseas education is worth it? What makes it worth/ not worth it? What are the intangible benefits, in your opinion, that you may have gained from your years abroad thus far? Definitely, cost was a concern. My parents and I googled the cost of living in different cities, and universities often include cost of living in their respective cities in their prospectus. That will be a good way for you to gauge your expenses in your time abroad. However, studying overseas has been an eye-opening experience. Ive only been abroad for a year and Ive been exposed to countless new experiences that I wouldnt have done back home. Theres lots to do and lots to learn abroad, especially learning to grow out of your comfort zone as a minority and living independently.

    Are you living comfortably based on your current monthly allowance either from parents/ scholarship provider? (Please indicate how much per month if you are comfortable with it) How do you manage your finances? What do you spend most and save on most? Any tips for budgeting? Im living comfortably with my current monthly allowance from my scholarship provider, the allowance is more than sufficient to cover basic necessities and some travelling! I definitely spend most on travelling and exploring Europe so it will be important to save more during school terms as you usually end up overbudget during the holidays. Thats the time you take long holidays exploring Europe with new and old friends! I save most from cooking my own dinners either by myself or at our friends kitchens!

  • Introducing Le Qin Having graduated in 2011, Le Qin is at Cambridge University on a Loke Cheng Kim Scholarship. She will be majoring in zoology in the coming year.

    Which city are you living in? Cambridge! What were you most concerned with about this city (e.g. safety, hygiene, food, being homesick, making friends)? I was most concerned about fitting in since we stay in colleges which are smaller communities of the student population, and I was worried I couldnt find a group of friends I could identify with. It turned out alright in the end though, since our college has quite a large international student community and I got to know my other British friends who were taking the same subject as me. (Note: Colleges are where we stay and have our tutorials (called supervisions in Cambridge) whereas we have our lectures in department.)

    What do you like most about your city? I love the atmosphere in Cambridge, where historical buildings and modern shops stand side by side, and cobblestone paths and narrow, haphazard alleys give off this quaint, scholarly feel. The people here are generally very helpful and friendly, which makes it an even more pleasant place to live in. It is also probably one of the safest towns in the UK for its population size. What do you dislike most about your city? If I really had to dislike something, it would be that there are no Singaporean restaurants here. But its alright, Londons just a one hour train ride away! Is there a must-do or must-see or must-eat (being Singaporeans)? Must-do: Punting, which involves using a long pole to push off the river bed in order to propel a flat bottomed boat along the river Cam. Highly inefficient mode of transport but you get to see the scenic College Backs. Must-see: Kings College. Its a very iconic view. Must-eat: Nah, not much in Cambridge.

  • How did you approach your parents regarding the financing of your tertiary education? I didnt really. I just knew I had to get a scholarship if I wanted to go overseas. Were you concerned about the costs of an overseas education? What were the pros and cons that went through your parents and your mind? Yes, definitely! It costs quite a lot, and would have been out of reach for me if I hadnt managed to get a scholarship. Luckily for me, I did! There werent many pros and cons that we considered because the decision was quite clear-cut for me. Thus far, do you think the financial cost of an overseas education is worth it? What makes it worth/ not worth it? I do think that studying overseas offers a wider range of experiences and novelty that studying at home cannot provide, such as having formal dinners with the Fellows (aka teachers), having smaller class sizes (2-3 students to a teacher, making t