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Transcript of Use of Lean Manufacturing by applying a kit preparation ... 1.1 A definition of Lean manufacturing...

  • POLITECNICO DI TORINO Collegio di Ingegneria Meccanica, Aerospaziale, dell’Autoveicolo e della

    Produzione

    Corso di Laurea Magistrale in Automotive Engineering – Management of Industrial Processes

    Tesi di Laurea Magistrale

    Use of Lean Manufacturing by applying a kit preparation process in Formula 1

    composites production

    Relatore Candidato Prof.ssa Anna Cagliano

    Matteo Ruffatto

    Supervisore aziendale Ing. Daniel Lacide

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    Table of Contents 1. Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 4

    1.1 A definition of Lean manufacturing ................................................................................. 4

    1.2 The history of Lean Manufacturing: the Toyota production System ............................... 5

    1.3 The Toyota Production System revolution ....................................................................... 6

    1.3.1 The 7 wastes of Toyota Production System ............................................................... 7

    1.3.2 The TPS house: an organic description of the Toyota Production System ................ 9

    1.3.3 TPS house’s pillars: the tools sustaining the system ................................................ 10

    1.3.4 Foundations of the TPS house: the base of the system ............................................ 12

    1.3.5 The cultural side of TPS: the Toyota way ................................................................ 15

    1.4 From TPS to the Lean Manufacturing ............................................................................ 19

    2. Literature review: an evaluation of the field of interest .................................................... 24

    2.1 Lean manufacturing in Formula 1 environment ............................................................. 24 2.2 Lean manufacturing in High-Mix-Low-Volume production ..................................... 25

    3. Company presentation ....................................................................................................... 34

    3.1 Product portfolio – GT cars ............................................................................................ 34

    3.2 Manufacturing facilities .................................................................................................. 36

    3.3 Formula 1 participation .................................................................................................. 37 4. Kit preparation project ...................................................................................................... 39

    4.1 Composites division in Ferrari GeS................................................................................ 39

    4.2 Context and problems detected in the composites plant................................................. 40

    4.3 Analysis of the AS IS process ........................................................................................ 46 4.3.1 Clean Room 1: information flows ............................................................................ 47

    4.3.2 Clean Room 1: material flows .................................................................................. 53

    4.3.3 Body shop: information flows .................................................................................. 62

    4.3.4 Body shop: material flows........................................................................................ 67

    4.4 Design of the TO BE process ......................................................................................... 80

    4.4.1 Clean room 1: information flows ............................................................................. 80

    4.4.2 Clean room 1: material flows ................................................................................... 84

    4.4.3 Body shop: information flows .................................................................................. 94

    4.4.4 Body shop: material flows........................................................................................ 96

    4.5 Practical implementation .............................................................................................. 101

    4.5.1 Planned introduction steps ..................................................................................... 101

    4.5.2 Physical process design .......................................................................................... 104

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    4.5.3 Analysis of the logics for grouping materials in kits ............................................. 104

    5. Conclusions ..................................................................................................................... 111 5.1 Expected results and benefits for the company ............................................................ 111

    5.2 Limitation of the thesis project ..................................................................................... 113

    5.2.1 Time availability .................................................................................................... 113

    5.2.2 Debug of the developed software tool.................................................................... 113

    5.3 Next steps for the company .......................................................................................... 115

    6. Bibliography .................................................................................................................... 117

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    1. Introduction The following thesis provides the analysis and design of a kit preparation process as a strategy to reduce wastes associated with operators’ movement in the context of Formula 1 composites

    parts’ production. As part of a Lean manufacturing implementation strategy, the designed kitting process is aimed at presenting to the point of use materials needed for manufacturing in pre-assembled kits, so as to avoid time wasted in searching for materials and reduce the risk of out-of-stocks discovered just-in-time for production. The kit preparation process is made possible by a redesign of the current information flows aimed at the development of a software tool able to generate a dashboard giving the status and position of any searched item required for manufacturing. Given the inherent extreme variability of a Formula 1 production plant, the designed traceability software tool aims at supporting both the picking operations and the daily planning of the shops involved in the project.

    As an introduction to the development of the thesis, a description of the Lean manufacturing concept is given, analysing its origin and development path from the original system to the modern Lean methodologies. Afterwards, in the chapter 2 the literature review will be introduced, analysing the wider sector of Engineer-to-Order manufacturing systems and the research gap in which the topic of this thesis will be developed. Chapter 3, then, will introduce Ferrari, the company in which the project has been developed, and its core business.

    The analysis and design of the kit preparation process is presented in Chapter 4, in which the context and issues found in Clean Room 1 and Body shop, i.e. the two shops involved in the improvement plan, are introduced. Starting from a description of the AS IS situation, a TO BE scenario featuring the kit preparation process and the newly designed software tool will be presented. Chapter 4 ends with the planning and description of the practical implementation steps required, with the additional design of a suitable logic to group materials in the kits.

    Finally, Chapter 5 will introduce the conclusions of the project, with the expected benefits for the company, the issues found during the development and implementation phase, and the next steps to pursue the Lean ideal in the context of Ferrari’s Formula 1 production plants.

    1.1 A definition of Lean manufacturing “Lean production is an integrated socio-technical system whose main objective is to eliminate waste by concurrently reducing or minimizing supplier, customer and internal variability.” [1] Conceptualized by Toyota with its Toyota Production System (TPS), Lean manufacturing is not only a set of acknowledged technical tools to be used in manufacturing and operational management for waste minimization, but it is, most of all, a cultural mindset aimed at operations excellence and continuous improvement. This characteristic of being two-sided, technical and social, is the real core of the Lean manufacturing concept and it is on the one end what it makes so powerful, but on the other side it is also what it makes its implementation so hard and time consuming. Indeed, if setting up a series of techniques for streamlining operations and reducing the surface problems in the manufacturing shops is

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    relatively easy, changing the whole company cultural mindset from the highest hierarchy to the production shop operators require a strong and sustained effort that not all the companies are able to keep up.

    1.2 The history of Lean Manufacturing: the Toyota production System Lean manufacturing concept is inextricably linked to the history of Toyota and its TPS, from which not only the technical Lean tools have been originated, but in particular the cultural and social background on which the entire Lean method relies.

    Born at the end of the 19th century as a wooden l