Understanding the Value of Database Discovery - Beyond Unstructured Data

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Transcript of Understanding the Value of Database Discovery - Beyond Unstructured Data

Firm Introduction to BDO Presentation

UNDERSTANDING THE VALUE OF DATABASE DISCOVERY BEYOND UNSTRUCTURED DATA

#Hello and welcome to this ACEDS webcast, Understanding the Value of Database Discovery Beyond Unstructured Data, presented by BDO. I`m Robert Hilson of ACEDS and I`m joined today by two excellent presenters, who I will introduce in a moment. First I have two brief announcements. 1Join Today! aceds.org/join

Exclusive News and AnalysisMonthly Members-Only WebcastsNetworking with CEDS, MembersOn-Demand Training

ResourcesJobs Boardbits + bytes NewsletterAffinity Partner Discounts

ACEDS provides an excellent, much needed forum to train, network and stay current on critical information. Kimarie Stratos, General Counsel, Memorial Health Systems, Ft. Lauderdale

#Id like to welcome everyone on the call who is new to ACEDS. ACEDS is a membership association owned and managed by Barbri that is committed to promoting e-discovery skill and competence through training, education, and networking. We offer the Certified E-Discovery Specialist credential, which is held by more than a thousand practitioners in the US and globally. You can join today and start receiving a number of benefits exclusive to our members, including news content, members-only webcasts, our bits+bytes newsletter, a members directory, and special benefits from our affinity partners, which now include EDRM and Tru Staffing Partners. You can join today

2

#ACEDS members, CEDS and conference alumni can attend this years conference at special rates. Were moving this year to the Gaylord National Resort in Washington, DC, where well be from September 28 to the 30. We expect this to be our best show yet. Weve announced a number of great speakers, including those you see on your screen. Last week, we announced several new speakers, including Craig Ball and Peter Stein, who is an attorney and Director of Flight Operations at Johnson Controls. If you visit ediscoveryconference.com, you can and learn more about the program and the topics we`ll cover, and if you feel so inclined, you can register to attend. 3

PRESENTERSStephanie L. Giammarco sits on BDOs Board of Directors and leads BDOs Forensic Technology Services practice with more than 20 years of experience and a background in accounting, information technology and criminology. Having worked on some of the largest financial frauds to date, she has led teams creating databases of millions of records, performed advanced data analytics and provided testimony pertaining to damages and electronically stored information.Stephanie provides litigation and consulting services to organizations and their counsel, including data analytics, computer forensics and e-discovery services related to domestic and international matters involving product liability, financial statement fraud, class action lawsuits, internal investigations, securities fraud, employee and vendor schemes, and breach of contract. She is skilled in the collection, preservation and analysis of electronic evidence, as well as the implementation of various e-discovery tools.She has been deposed as a Rule 30(b)6 e-discovery witness and testified before the Judicial Arbitration Services on the calculation of damages in contract disputes. Stephanie has published and presented on a range of computer forensics and e-discovery topics, including before the Securities and Exchange Commission, Security Industry Authority and National Futures Association.Chris J. Lopata is of counsel at Jones Day in New York. His practice focuses on complex and general civil litigation, including product liability, toxic torts, credit reporting, and a wide range of business litigation. Chris is a member of the firm's e-Discovery Committee and serves as the New York office coordinator for e-discovery issues. Chris has led discovery teams in numerous joint defense groups. He has extensive experience coordinating affirmative and defensive e-discovery efforts on behalf of clients. Chris' practice extends beyond pretrial e-discovery. He has served as lead trial counsel in a variety of commercial disputes in New York State courts. He also has counseled clients who have sought and obtained favorable settlements in non-trial bound business disputes.The views set forth herein are the personal views of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the law firm with which he is associated. Stephanie L. Giammarco, CPA/CITP, CFE, CEDSPartner, BDO Consulting

sgiammarco@bdo.comDirect: 212-885-7439

Christopher J. Lopata Of Counsel, Jones Day

cjlopata@jonesday.comDirect: 212-326-3602

#Okay, lets get started. We have two excellent presenters for you today. They both have very impressive bios, which are on our site. I encourage you to go there and read them in full.

Stephanie Giammarco you know. She sits on BDOs Board of Directors and leads the firms Forensic Technology Services practice. She has more than 20 years of experience and a background in accounting, information technology and criminology. Having worked on some of the largest financial frauds to date, she has led teams creating databases of millions of records, performed advanced data analytics and provided testimony pertaining to damages and electronically stored information. She is also CEDS-certified and is a member of the ACEDS Advisory Board. Stephanie, its great to be with you again. Thanks for being here.

Stephanie is joined by Chris Lopata, an attorney at Jones Day in New York. His practice focuses on complex and general civil litigation, including product liability, toxic torts, credit reporting, and a wide range of business litigation. Chris is a member of the firm's e-Discovery Committee and serves as the New York office coordinator for e-discovery issues. He has led discovery teams in numerous joint defense groups, and has extensive experience coordinating affirmative and defensive e-discovery efforts on behalf of clients.

Chris, thanks for being here. Alright, before we get started, I do want to encourage everyone to ask questions, and we will try to get to them at the end of the presentation if time allows.

4OUR AGENDAA quick poll of the audienceStructured v. unstructured dataSome necessary definitionsExamples of database-driven applicationsThe database schema and data dictionaryTheories of database discoveryDatabase discovery: methods for pulling data for review and productionPractice pointers

#5

A Quick Poll

on Database Discovery#6A QUICK POLLWho knows what a database is?A fancy Excel spreadsheet. A collection of rows and columns, each populated with a value.

Who has used a database as part of their personal or work activities?All of you haveGoogle & Lexus for research. Your time-keeping system, Concordance, Summation, and Relativity, are all databases. Your companys email system is effectively a database.

Who has had to conduct discovery from a database (or database-driven application)?Sales and Marketing (CRM), Human Resources (HRIS), and GL/Inventory (ERP). SAP, and Hyperion are perfect examples.

Bonus Question: Who can tell me what a relational database is?A bunch of Excel spreadsheets (tables) linked together by a common key

#7

DEFINITIONS

Unstructured v. Structured DataThe TableThe Relational Database

#8DEFINITIONS| UNSTRUCTURED V. STRUCTURED DATAUnstructured DataWikipedia definition: Unstructured Data(orunstructured information) refers to information that does not have a pre-defineddata model. Unstructured information is typicallytext-heavy, but may contain data such as dates, numbers, and facts as well.Translation: MS office files, loose files, most of the information that you can see via Windows Explorer.

Structured DataDefinition: Structured Data is information that resides in fixed fields within a record or file, or is information that is organized into rows and columns, with pre-set characteristics.Translation: Multiple tables, containing rows and columns which relate to each other via common key.

#9DEFINITIONS| THE TABLE (THE CORE OF THE DATABASE)Records, not filesRows v. columnsTables maintain the relationship between columnsA field is another way of saying columnData values, in the context of rows, columns and tables, is the substanceReal-time, constantly changing informationData dictionarySchema

#10DEFINITIONS| THE RELATIONAL DATABASESome databases only have one table (flat file systems) and are no different than a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet (very rare).Relational databases, which are much more common, have multiple tables, each with a key that links them together.How can relational databases be more challenging to handle than flat file systems in the context of discovery?Why do we use databases?

#11

DATABASES

Database-Driven ApplicationsThe SchemaThe Data Dictionary

#12DATABASES| DATABASE-DRIVEN APPLICATIONSA database, when combined with a user interface is often called a database-driven application.Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP)Data Warehouses & Business Intelligence SystemsHuman Resource Information System (HRIS)Customer Relationship Management (CRM)Adverse Effects SystemsSharePointEmail Archiving SystemskCura Relativity

DATABASES ARE ALL AROUND US AND WE WORK WITH THEM EVERY DAY.

#Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP): Inventory, general ledger, accounts receivable, and accounts payable. SAP is the most common examples.Data Warehouses & Business Intelligence Systems: A data warehouse is a centralized system with summary data. BI software is usually the application that helps generate reports from a data warehouse or group of enterprise systems. Hyperion and BlackLine are common examples.Human Resource Information System (HRIS): Employee data, job history, performance informatio