Tx history-ch-18.2

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Transcript of Tx history-ch-18.2

  • Chapter 18: Texas & the Civil WarSection 2: The Civil War Begins

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  • Thinking QuestionWhat are the Unions options against the South?

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  • A Call to Arms

    April 1861: Confederate attack on Fort Sumter marked beginning of Civil War

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  • Fort SumterApril 4, 1861

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  • Fort SumterApril 1865

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  • A Call to ArmsLincoln calls for 75,000 volunteers

    Virginia, Arkansas, Tennessee, and North Carolina secede

    Thousands of Texans rushed to join Confederate forces.

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  • A Call to ArmsEnd of 1861: 25,000 Texans in Confederate army

    Regimentsunits of about 1,000 soldiers

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  • A Call to ArmsTerrys Texas RangersB.F. TerryHoods Texas BrigadeJohn Bell HoodRosss Texas BrigadeLawrence Sullivan Ross

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  • A Call to ArmsJohn Reagan Postmaster General, served in Jefferson Davis cabinet

    Francis Lubbock First Confederate General of Texas

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  • A Call to Arms

    Albert Sidney JohnstonTexan who was the second highest-ranking officer in the Confederate army until he was killed in battle

    Albert Sidney Johnston

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  • Texas Readies for WarTexas troop ill-equipped

    Texas government seized federal property

    Captured $1 million worth of supplies in San Antonio

    States resources put to use

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  • Resources & StrategiesNorthern Advantages:

    Larger population

    Railroads

    Factories

    Established government

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  • Resources & StrategiesSouthern advantages:

    Experienced military leaders

    Experience in riding horses and using firearms

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  • Resources & StrategiesConfederate strategy:

    Defensive war

    Souths greatest resource for trade with the world was cotton

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  • Resources & StrategiesUnion strategy:

    Blockade of southern seaports

    Take control of the Mississippi

    Capture Richmond, Virginiacapital of Confederacy

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  • Resources & StrategiesWar in three theatres:

    East: Washington D.C. & Richmond

    Tennessee and Mississippi

    West of the Mississippi River

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  • The Major Battles of the Civil WarMajor battles took place east of the Mississippi

    First Battle of Bull Run (July 1861):

    Union attempt to capture Richmond

    Union forces drove out of Virginia

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  • Home destroyed during First Battle of Bull RunJuly 1861

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  • The Major Battles of the Civil WarBattle of Antietam (September 17, 1862):

    Lee clashes with Union force in Maryland

    Union victory

    12,000 Union casualties

    13,000 Confederate casualties

    Bloodiest day in American History

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  • President Lincoln and Gen. George B. McClellan in the general's tent

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  • Allan Pinkerton, President Lincoln, and Maj. Gen. John A. McClernand

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  • Battle of AntietamSeptember 17, 1862

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  • Confederate Dead at Antietam

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  • The Major Battles of the Civil WarBattle of Gettysburg (July 1-3, 1863)

    Union victory

    Lee on defensive for the rest of war

    23,000 Union casualties

    28,000 Confederate casualties

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  • Soldiers at Gettysburg

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  • Union and Confederate Dead at Gettysburg

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  • The Major Battles of the Civil WarThe struggle to control the Mississippi River Valley was costly and of major significance to the war.

    Battle of Shiloh (April 1862):

    Costly for both sides

    Albert Sidney Johnston killed

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  • The Major Battles of the Civil WarSiege of Vicksburg (July 1863):

    Controlled traffic on Mississippi

    Six week siege

    Confederacy split in two

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  • U.S.S. St. Louis (Ironclad)

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  • Section 2: The Civil War Begins

    Northern StrategySouthern Strategy

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