To turn in your folder: Essay #2: final draft 1 st draft (conference) 2 nd draft (peer edit) peer...

Click here to load reader

  • date post

    14-Dec-2015
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    212
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of To turn in your folder: Essay #2: final draft 1 st draft (conference) 2 nd draft (peer edit) peer...

  • Slide 1

To turn in your folder: Essay #2: final draft 1 st draft (conference) 2 nd draft (peer edit) peer editing sheet outline Slide 2 Comparison/Contrast Shows how two equivalent things are similar or different Slide 3 These are non-equivalent things: Slide 4 Dont make analogies Slide 5 Equivalent things can be compared or contrasted: Slide 6 Slide 7 Slide 8 Comparison Makes a point by showing how two equivalent things are unexpectedly similar. Slide 9 Contrast Makes a point by showing how two equivalent things are unexpectedly different. Or how one thing is better than the other. Slide 10 Comparison/Contrast Makes a point by demonstrating how, although two equivalent things are admittedly similar, they are different in one or more important ways. Or how, although they are admittedly different, they are similar in one or more important ways. Slide 11 Basic rule for comparing or contrasting: cover both sides equally. Give each side strong explanation and evidence. Slide 12 Block or Subject-by-Subject Organization showing features A, B, and C for items 1 and 2 AVOID this! Item 1 A B C Item 2 A B C Slide 13 Block or Subject-by-Subject Organization showing features A, B, and C for items 1 and 2 Why should you AVOID this? Item 1-Mini A gas mileage B handling C parking Item 2-Buick A gas mileage B handling C parking Slide 14 Trait-by-Trait showing features A, B, and C for items 1 and 2 Good idea? Feature A1 2 Feature B 1 2 Feature C1 2 Slide 15 Trait-by-Trait showing features A, B, and C for items 1 and 2 Why is this a good idea? Feature A-gas mileage 1 Mini 2 Buick Feature B-handling 1 Mini 2 Buick Feature C-parking 1 Mini 2 Buick Slide 16 Good Examples of Point-by-Point Paragraph Organization Slide 17 Twin-paragraph pattern showing Feature A Topic sentence covering Items 1 & 2 Explanation of Item 1 Evidence for Item 1 Topic sentence covering Item 2 Explanation of Item 2 Evidence for Item 2 Slide 18 For example: More importantly, a Mini-cooper gets better gas mileage than a full- size car. We laugh as we pass Cadillacs and Lincolns in gas stations hour after hour on the highway, gulping lakes of premium fuel. A few years ago I took a trip in a friends Buick Riviera from Boston to Chicago, keeping record of the gas we burned 72 gallons of high-octane in just under 1,000 miles, for a cost of $144. By contrast, the Mini-Cooper sips cheaper fuel on a trip. Last year my brother and I drove the Mini about the same distance as above (from Chattanooga to Fort Lauderdale) using just 33 gallons of regular fuel, for which we paid $56. In Lauderdale itself we filled up only once, though we spent hours driving to and from the beaches, and took a couple of side trips to Miami. That left us $88 extra to have fun with. Slide 19 Two-story paragraph showing Feature A Topic sentence covering Items 1 & 2 Explanation of similarity or difference Evidence: short twin stories Slide 20 For example: More importantly, a Mini-Cooper gets better gas mileage than a full-size car. We laugh as we pass Cadillacs and Lincolns in gas stations hour after hour on the highway. Moreover when we do fill up, the Mini sips regular gas while those dinosaurs gulp lakes of premium fuel. A few years ago, I took a trip in a friends Buick Riviera from Boston to Chicago, keeping record of the gas we burned 72 high-octane gallons in just under 1,000 miles. Last year my brother and I drove the Mini about the same distance (from Chattanooga to Fort Lauderdale) using just 33 gallons of regular fuel. Slide 21 Two-sided paragraph showing Feature A Topic sentence covering Items 1 & 2 Explanation of similarity or difference Evidence: one story showing both sides Slide 22 For example: More importantly, our Mini-Cooper handles much better than a full-size car, especially on curvy roads. Once while attending Pacific Union College, I followed a friend down the twisting mountain road to St. Helena where he would leave his Ford Galaxy for routine servicing. By the time we finished the eight-mile drive I had passed him, watching as he disappeared from my rear-view mirror. I waited at our destination for several minutes until his car lumbered into view like an exhausted elephant. Slide 23 Single paragraph showing Feature A with one exclusionary story Topic sentence covering Items 1 & 2 Explanation of similarity or difference Evidence: one story showing something that couldnt possibly happen to one of the items. Slide 24 For example: More importantly, that Mini-Cooper is certainly better adapted to city driving than is a full-size car. Whether we are dodging around in traffic or zipping through narrow alleys, the thing really performs. A few weeks ago, for instance, we were driving around downtown Atlanta looking for parking space when we saw a spot no more than ten feet from a no parking zone. The little car snuggles right into that tight place, staying legal in a space that no full-size monster would have had any chance of occupying. Slide 25 Lets look at your assignment sheet and a few examples. Assignments: Oct. 19: Outline Oct. 20: Read VanderMey, ch. 13; GC 1 retake Oct. 27: 1 st draft due; GC tests 2 & 3