TIPS Planning Form for Infants and Toddlers · PDF file 9,10 Goat, spider, web Jump, maa (make...

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Transcript of TIPS Planning Form for Infants and Toddlers · PDF file 9,10 Goat, spider, web Jump, maa (make...

  • This material is copyright protected by the Rollins Center for Language & Literacy at the Atlanta Speech School. Please reproduce for use with teachers, leaders, and parents. For more information, contact the Rollins Center at Rollinsinfo@AtlantaSpeechSchool.org.

    TIPS Planning Form for Infants and Toddlers

    Tune In, Introduce the Book, Promote Language, Summarize the Book

    Book Title: The Very Busy Spider Author: Eric Carle

    T: Tune In  Engage the child/children in a playful and loving interaction

     Capture the child’s/children’s interest in the book you have chosen What will you do to tune in and engage the child/children with this book? You can tune in and engage your children by using any song about farm animals. One that you might choose to use is “Old McDonald Had a Farm”. Lyrics are as follows: “Old McDonald had a farm, E, I , E, I , O And on that farm he had a pig, E, I, E, I , O With an oink, oink, here And an oink, oink there Here an oink, there an oink, everywhere an oink, oink. Old McDonald had a farm, E, I, E, I , O!” Continue to add animals and sounds (cow, sheep, horse, chicken)

    I: Introduce the Book

    • Draw the child/children’s attention to the illustration on the book’s cover. • Name the title of the book, briefly tell what it is about, and set the purpose for reading: “The name

    of this book is __________________” (It looks like… See this …This book is about …). “Let’s read the book and find out (state purpose). What will you say to introduce this book? The name of this book is The Very Busy Spider. This spider is working really hard to build a web on a farm. Let’s read and find out who she sees on the farm.

    P: Promote Language Engage in Responsive Interactions throughout the read:

    • Use child directed speech, touch, and a joyful nurturing voice. • Stay tuned in to children’s interests throughout the read – “read the child”. • Model book handling skills without interrupting the flow of the story. “Let’s turn the page and see

    what happens next.”

    • Connect to children’s life experiences while reading

    mailto:Rollinsinfo@AtlantaSpeechSchool.org

  • This material is copyright protected by the Rollins Center for Language & Literacy at the Atlanta Speech School. Please reproduce for use with teachers, leaders, and parents. For more information, contact the Rollins Center at Rollinsinfo@AtlantaSpeechSchool.org.

    Rollins Center for Language & Literacy

    P.A.T. the Vocabulary: Which words will you select to

    Point, Act, Tell?

    Talk around the Book: Use Think Alouds

    What comments will you make to explain character’s actions

    and feelings, and connect events?

    Page # Point Act Tell Your Think Aloud Comment

    1,2 Spider,

    thread,

    fence post,

    web

    Wind (blow

    softly)

    Thin – really

    skinny

    Silky - soft

    I see this spider has

    found a great place to

    build, or CONSTRUCT,

    her web.

    3,4 Horse,

    spider, web

    Neigh (make

    sound), ride

    (bounce up

    and down)

    Spinning –

    making her

    web

    The spider didn’t even

    answer the horse. I’m

    thinking that she is so

    DETERMINED to build

    her web (that means

    she won’t give up) that

    she won’t stop to do

    anything.

    5,6 Cow, spider,

    web

    Moo (make

    sound), didn’t

    answer (shake

    head)

    I notice that the spider

    is not answering the

    cow either, because she

    is so DETERMINED to

    finish her web, she

    won’t give up.

    7,8 Sheep,

    spider, web

    Baa (make

    sound), didn’t

    Bleated- Said

    Meadow – a

    I see that the spider

    doesn’t want to run

    with the sheep. She’s

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  • This material is copyright protected by the Rollins Center for Language & Literacy at the Atlanta Speech School. Please reproduce for use with teachers, leaders, and parents. For more information, contact the Rollins Center at Rollinsinfo@AtlantaSpeechSchool.org.

    Rollins Center for Language & Literacy

    answer (shake

    head)

    big grassy

    area

    really busy

    CONSTRUCTING, or

    building, her web.

    9,10 Goat, spider,

    web

    Jump, maa

    (make sound),

    didn’t answer

    (shake head)

    Look at the spider’s

    web – it’s getting so

    big! She is working so

    hard and she is so

    DETERMINED to build

    that web – she won’t

    give up! So, she won’t

    even answer when the

    goat wants her to go

    jump with him.

    11,12 Pig, spider,

    web

    Grunt (make

    oinking sound),

    didn’t answer

    (shake head)

    I don’t think that

    spiders like rolling in

    the mud, even when

    they are not building

    webs!

    13,14 Dog, spider,

    web

    Bark (make

    sound), didn’t

    answer (shake

    head)

    I see this fly, right by

    the dog’s head. I

    remember this fly from

    other pages. I wonder

    why it’s flying around.

    Let’s read and find out.

    mailto:Rollinsinfo@AtlantaSpeechSchool.org

  • This material is copyright protected by the Rollins Center for Language & Literacy at the Atlanta Speech School. Please reproduce for use with teachers, leaders, and parents. For more information, contact the Rollins Center at Rollinsinfo@AtlantaSpeechSchool.org.

    Rollins Center for Language & Literacy

    15,16 Cat, spider,

    web, fly

    Meow (make

    sound), didn’t

    answer (shake

    head)

    Look at the spider’s

    web, it looks almost

    finished! She has been

    so DETERMINED to

    CONSTRUCT, or build,

    her web, that she is

    nearly done!

    17,18 Duck, fly,

    spider, web

    Quack (make

    sound), swim

    (make

    swimming

    motions with

    arms), didn’t

    answer (shake

    head)

    I’m thinking that the

    spider is still not

    answering the animals

    because she is so

    DETERMINED to finish

    her web – she won’t

    give up! And, I notice

    that the web is filling up

    almost the whole space

    between the fence

    posts! It’s going to be a

    beautiful spider web!

    19,20 Rooster,

    spider, fly,

    web

    Cock-a-doodle-

    do (make

    sound), catch

    (make motion

    of catching

    with hand),

    Pesky:

    annoying

    Just like that

    – really fast

    Oh my! The spider

    caught the fly in the

    web that she

    CONSTRUCTED, she

    built! Spider webs are

    very sticky, so the fly

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  • This material is copyright protected by the Rollins Center for Language & Literacy at the Atlanta Speech School. Please reproduce for use with teachers, leaders, and parents. For more information, contact the Rollins Center at Rollinsinfo@AtlantaSpeechSchool.org.

    Rollins Center for Language & Literacy

    just like that

    (snap fingers)

    would stick to the web

    when he flew into it.

    And, now the spider will

    eat that fly for her

    dinner! Yum, yum!

    21,22 Owl, web,

    spider

    Whoo (make

    sound), asleep

    (fold hands,

    tuck under

    head like you

    are asleep)

    I see that the spider is

    so tired from

    CONSTRUCTING, or

    building, her web, that

    she has fallen fast

    asleep. She saw so

    many farm animals, but

    she didn’t stop to play!

    She was DETERMINED

    to build her web, and

    catch her dinner! That

    spider did not give up!

    S: Summarize the Book  Restate the purpose of the read: “We just read about a spider building, or CONSTRUCTING, her web on

    a farm. Let’s look back at all of the animals that she saw while she was working”

     Encourage children to point to pictures that show meaning of key words or, if they are talking, to use

    key vocabulary to name pictures.

     Ask simple questions about events, characters’ actions or feelings:

    What questions will you ask children about the events and characters in this book?

    o What does the pig (or goat, or cow) sound like? o What did the horse want the spider to do? o How did the spider get to the farm? o How did the spider feel when her web was finished?

    mailto:Rollinsinfo@AtlantaSpeechSchool.org

  • This material is copyright protected by the Rollins Center for Language & Literacy at the Atlanta Speech School. Pleas