Timothy Beard, Ph.D. · PDF file Culture shock is the anxiety, feelings of frustration,...

Click here to load reader

  • date post

    03-Aug-2020
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    0
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of Timothy Beard, Ph.D. · PDF file Culture shock is the anxiety, feelings of frustration,...

  • Exploring Culture Shock:

    Retention of African American Men

    Timothy Beard, Ph.D. Pasco-Hernando Community College

    Darlena Jones, Ph.D., EBI

    http://phcc.edu/

  • Research on African American Male Retention

    Male Ideation

    Social and Cultural Isolation

    Financially Expectant

    Social Justice Deprivation

    Academically Marginalized

    Gender Defused

    Masculinity Bound

  • Improving Retention

    Early Alert Systems

    Peer Mentors

    Tutoring

    Financial Aid Student Activities

    Living / Learning

    Communities

    First-Year Experience

    With the

    exception of Early

    Alert Systems,

    these are all

    passive

    interventions

  • Culture Shock

    Culture shock is the anxiety, feelings of frustration, alienation

    and anger that may occur when a person is placed in a new

    culture (seen primarily in people moving to foreign countries).

    (Wikipedia)

    Four Phases:

    • Honeymoon phase: Romantic, fascination

    • Negotiation phase: Differences begin creating anxiety

    • Adjustment: Begin to feel comfortable with new culture

    • Mastery: Participate fully and comfortable in new culture

  • Metrics of Culture Shock

    Culture Shock

    Internal

    External

    Populations

    • Homesickness

    • Poor social integration

    • Poor peer connections

    • Low commitment

    • Behavioral issues

    • Mental Health issues

    • Isolation

    • Not getting involved

    • Financial Issues

    • First-Generation

    • Minority students

    • Rural to urban

    • Urban to rural

    • International students

  • What Predicts Retention?

    http://phcc.edu/

  • Predicting Retention

    Demographic factors

    Non-Cognitive Measures

    Behavioral/ Environmental

    Cognitive Measures

    Admissions controls which students come

    to your institution.…

    These are within your influence…

  • Areas of Influence…

    Behavioral / Environmental

    • Satisfying living environment, financial issues, campus climate, family issues

    Non-Cognitive

    • Academic and social integration, academic self-efficacy, goals, resiliency, social comfort, educational commitment

    Getting students

    help to overcome

    issues like financial

    or housing will

    likely solve some

    retention problems.

    But what about

    social/academic

    integration?

  • MAP-Works Data Set

    2010-2011 Participants

    • 79 4-Year Institutions submitting over 133,000 students

    Fall 2011 Fall Transition Survey

    • 76% response rate

    Fall 2011 Fall Check-Up Survey

    • 46% response rate

    Individual Student Profile

    • 68 institutions provided fall term GPA

    • 59 institutions provided fall-to-spring persistence data

  • • Conceived at Ball State

    University 22 years ago

    • Partnership leveraging

    EBI’s research, theory,

    technology, and

    experience

    powered by

    MAP-Works was created by

    educators, for educators

  • The Whole is Greater

    Identifies Risk

    Motivates

    Informs Staff

    Manages Strategy

    Analytics & Reporting

    Provides Feedback

  • Quickly Identify Students

    Drill down to see

    Johnathan’s

    Talking Points…

  • Johnathan’s Risk

    Indicator was Green,

    now it’s yellow…

    Quickly identify most

    recent issues

  • • Using Fall 2010 MAP-Works data

    • Comparing students who responded to Fall Transition Survey (~ 3 weeks in to fall term) to the Fall Check-Up Survey (~ 10 weeks in to fall term)

    • Cutting perceptions by persistence/attrited status

    • Two groups of students: African American Men (4,768 students) compared to all others (~110,000)

    Matched Data Set

  • 61%

    38%

    2%

    23%

    64%

    13%

    Low Entrance (ACT =1291)

    African American Men All Other Students

    Entrance Test Scores

    The majority of African

    American Men enter

    college with lower test

    scores The majority of all

    other students enter

    with moderate test

    scores

  • 47%

    21%

    34%

    32%

    20%

    48%

    African American Men All Other Students

    Fall Term GPA >= 3.0

    Fall Term GPA 2.0 to 2.9

    Fall Term GPA < 2.0

    Fall Term Outcomes

    16% 10%

    84% 90%

    African American Men

    All Other Students

    Attrited Persisted

  • Differences in African American Men and All Other Students

    Differences

    Social Integration

    Institutional Commitment

    Basic Academic

    Skills

    Financial Means

    Academic Integration

  • Overall, to what degree:

    – Do you belong here?

    – Are you fitting in?

    – Are you satisfied with your social life on campus?

    Social Integration

  • Social Integration: Changes

    10%

    11%

    11%

    7%

    31%

    37%

    36%

    33%

    59%

    53%

    53%

    59%

    All Other Students

    African American Men

    All Other Students

    African American Men F

    a ll

    C h e

    c k U

    p F

    a ll

    T ra

    n s it io

    n

    Low (Mean < 4.0) Moderate (Mean < 6.0) High (Mean >= 6.0)

    Early in term, Af Am Men

    slightly higher

    But, 7 weeks later, Af Am Men slightly lower

    – overestimated earlier integration?

  • 37%

    8%

    22%

    10%

    37%

    31%

    42%

    37%

    26%

    61%

    36%

    53%

    Attrited

    Persisted

    Attrited

    Persisted A

    ll O

    th e r

    S tu

    d e n ts

    A fr

    ic a n

    A m

    e ri c a n

    M e

    n

    Low (Mean < 4.0) Moderate (Mean < 6.0) High (Mean >= 6.0)

    Social Integration: Persistence

    Attrited were impacted by lack

    of Social Integration

    … but not as impacted as

    the other students – why?

  • To what degree are you committed to completing your college degree at this institution

    To what degree do you intend to come back to this institution for the:

    – Spring term

    – Next academic year

    Institutional Commitment

  • 5%

    5%

    4%

    4%

    15%

    24%

    17%

    26%

    81%

    71%

    79%

    70%

    All Other Students

    African American Men

    All Other Students

    African American Men F

    a ll

    C h e

    c k U

    p F

    a ll

    T ra

    n s it io

    n

    Low (Mean < 4.0) Moderate (Mean < 6.0) High (Mean >= 6.0)

    Institutional Commitment: Changes

    Early in term, fewer Af Am

    Men are committed

    Same 7 weeks later

  • 43%

    2%

    26%

    4%

    24%

    14%

    32%

    25%

    33%

    83%

    42%

    71%

    Attrited

    Persisted

    Attrited

    Persisted A

    ll O

    th e r

    S tu

    d e n ts

    A fr

    ic a n

    A m

    e ri c a n

    M e

    n

    Low (Mean < 4.0) Moderate (Mean < 6.0) High (Mean >= 6.0)

    Institutional Commitment: Persistence

    A smaller segment of Af Am men who

    stayed are committed to institution Fewer attrited men wanted

    to leave

  • To what degree are you confident that you can pay for:

    – Next term's tuition and fees

    – Monthly living expenses (e.g. room / board / utilities / rent)

    – Social activities (e.g. eating out, going to movies) with your friends

    Financial Means

  • Financial Means: Breakdown

    10%

    7%

    20%

    14%

    16%

    17%

    15%

    23%

    25%

    37%

    13%

    4%

    All Other Students

    African American Men

    Not receiving aid but need it About 25%

    About 50% 75% or more

    All or nearly all Not receiving aid, don't need it

    64% of African American men receive 75% or

    more of need through financial aid (or they

    don’t need it) compared to 53% of other

    students

    7% of African

    American men don’t

    receive any aid and

    really need it!

  • 17%

    23%

    21%

    29%

    34%

    40%

    43%

    44%

    49%

    37%

    36%

    26%

    All Other Students

    African American Men

    All Othe